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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    "Elfie?" Oh, good grief. You're not Australian, are you? They annoyingly truncate everything and add "-ie" on the end. Makes them sound like they're perpetually talking to three-year-olds.
    Nice glass house you got there, Skipper.
    Everybody have fun tonight. Everybody Wang Chung tonight.

    Johari
    /Nohari

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    If only ideas matter and not people, then the race and age and nationality of the people involved should not be an issue for you... only the ideas count.

    It sounds like you've got some strong ideas on the topic. Why not explain in more detail so people can sift through them?

    ...meanwhile... everyone else should probably just take a deep breath.
    *sucks in*



    can I let go of the breath now?

  3. #63
    a white iris elfinchilde's Avatar
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    ^.

    haha. Let off, sis. One chooses one's opponents in a debate. It has to be measure for measure.

    anyhow, just for those who were annoyed/curious:

    elfinchilde--childe is old English for child.

    I usually let others online call me elf/elfie, because it is much shorter and easier than typing out an archaic/synthetic word. On other forums, i had all sorts of permutations of 'elfinchilde'. People had informed me that it was difficult to pronounce/type.

    Hence, it is out of courtesy to others that i allow the diminutive form. Besides, sometimes, i AM called elfie in real life.

    cool off time!

    PS: hope the Australians don't mind the comment. Take comfort in that the Canadians do it too. Americans will use the 'y' as a diminutive. Languages are such beautiful things, because from them, you can see the culture of the people. Their psyche, the zeitgeist of their culture and time.
    You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    They called me the hyacinth girl.
    Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.

    --T.S Eliot, The Wasteland

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mort Belfry View Post
    I was just watching Gosford Park and whilst doing so it occurred to me that films that are set in early last century, and possibly before, have a lot of women fainting scenes.

    Now is it just a myth, or are there social reasons why women don't faint anymore? Is it just not cool to faint now, or was it only the women that wanted attention that used to do it? Was it because the clothes they used to wear were so tight and impractical, like those stupid corset things, that a simple gasp would empty the lungs and render the poor girl without oxygen? Was a faint just an exaggerated swoon of emotion? Or were they just seizures and panic attacks?

    Do women still faint? Do men ever faint? I've never seen anyone of all the variations of the two sexes faint in real life. Does anyone know anyone else that faints a lot? What is a faint anyway? What's happening in neurological terms? Should I have looked up wikipedia before posting this?

    If anyone knows the definitive answer, please don't post it straight away. I'd rather hear some people's bizarre theories first.
    Mort.

    I got another theory for you.

    Could women faint because men's jeans are too tight?

  5. #65
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    That's all you see, and you see that as connected with equality?

    You're Asian and how old?
    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    "Elfie?" Oh, good grief. You're not Australian, are you? They annoyingly truncate everything and add "-ie" on the end. Makes them sound like they're perpetually talking to three-year-olds.

    Much of what you posted has to do with the insecurities of identity and youth, not feminism.
    my my my... for someone who's trying to sound above equality you sure have some prejudices against several groups of people

    It's a joking thread for goodness sake :steam:
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  6. #66
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skip View Post
    Equality elevates, not denigrates. Reducing everyone to the lowest common denominator is a poor excuse for equality.

    ("Binds of equality?" Where do people get this stuff?)
    Please define equality for me... What does equality entail for you?

    PS: hope the Australians don't mind the comment. Take comfort in that the Canadians do it too. Americans will use the 'y' as a diminutive. Languages are such beautiful things, because from them, you can see the culture of the people. Their psyche, the zeitgeist of their culture and time.
    Eh? Speak for yourself elfie! Mouse goes by mouse.

    The endings are added as a form of endearment... much like Japanese honorifics... -chan. There's no reason for you to partake in another's culture if you do not wish to Skip. Do as your namesake and just "skip" it....

  7. #67
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    'Tis ok, whatever, we've nothing to hide, I don't think he meant any offence, it is just a direct way of asking a question. Online it is hard to see manner/motives, so I wouldn't presume.

    Mort: I had a friend who had an aversion to blood, she'd drop like a drunk fly as soon as she saw blood, even if it was a picture.

    How I found out: We were in a library once, researching some topic, and she came across a tabloid style story of healing via hands-on, and boy, was it hands-on... the picture was a full page gory of stomach, hands inserted, pulling out intestines. It was more red than I've ever seen in one page.

    She hit the floor faster than a bunch of monkeys after a falling banana.

  8. #68
    Member skip's Avatar
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    I asked if she was Asian because she brought it up in another thread, saying she was Malaysian and talking about feminism or the treatment of women or something in Malaysia. Something about not wearing burqas? So maybe she has different experiences or conceptions of feminism or equality or whatever it is you want to call it due to her experiences in that culture. Or maybe that was someone else. As I said, I don't pay as much attention to people as to the ideas.

    And yes, age plays a tremendous factor in peer pressure and peer hyperidentification. All that "who am I and what am I going to be?" sounds much more like 20s angst than issues with egalitarianism.

  9. #69
    a white iris elfinchilde's Avatar
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    ^ ?? never said that. The race, country and all are wrong.

    Erm. To argue against the idea, don't you need first to know who to address it to? Unless the intention is just to be an observer, not an active participant.

    no matter. Done! Interesting points being brought up now. Move on.
    You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
    They called me the hyacinth girl.
    Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
    Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
    Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
    Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
    Looking into the heart of light, the silence.

    --T.S Eliot, The Wasteland

  10. #70
    Member skip's Avatar
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    To argue against the idea, don't you need first to know who to address it to?
    I'm not sure what you mean. Arguing? The ideas are there in the posts. It doesn't matter much who makes the posts. If it wasn't you, then it wasn't you.

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