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  1. #51
    Oberon
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    Some motorcycles are striking because they're beautiful... others are striking for specifically the opposite reason.

    This is the NSU Bison 2000, a 2,000cc 'thumper.' All of its two liters of displacement comes in a single cylinder with a cavity inside the size of a 2L soda bottle.




  2. #52
    Courage is immortality Valiant's Avatar
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    This might seem really normal... But if you remove that saddle and replace it with a single seat one, and take away the sissy bar... Then you have exactly what I want.


    Mightier than the tread of marching armies is the power of an idea whose time has come

  3. #53
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    I've found a new site to cruise for motorcycle porn.

    It's called Bike Exif and it's awesome.

    Here's a bike with a Harley V-twin that beats R1's at the track...

    Sundance QuickSilver XR1200

    Courtesy of: http://www.bikeexif.com/harley-xr1200#more-11890



    Sundance is one of the top Japanese custom motorcycle builders, but it’s a name unknown to a surprising number of westerners. Zak Shibazaki’s company focuses on performance as much as looks, with a range of high-tech, go-fast goodies designed to eke more horsepower out of stock Harleys. Sundance’s custom bikes always have the ‘go’ to match the ‘show’, and this 2010 machine is a prime example. The starting point is a 1995 Harley-Davidson XL1200S frame, with modifications including side rails to beef up the lateral and torsional rigidity. Then there’s a multitude of bespoke parts including that custom aluminum tank and a gorgeous painted carbon fiber seat unit. But the real action, however, comes from the motor. As with all Sundance ‘SuperXR’ engines, the bottom end comes from an Evo Sportster—but everything else is custom-built for racetrack performance.


    Sleeveless billet aluminum cylinders with NiCaSil-plated bores are crowned by Sundance-designed heads, and each cylinder is fed by a 41mm Sundance-Keihin FCR carb. It’s a relatively small-sized bore that was selected for smoother, more responsive street performance. The motor is tuned for torque and pulls hard from just over 2,000rpm. And there’s around 100hp measured at the rear wheel. (Which explains the heavy-duty Barnett clutch.) A triple-box-section aluminum swingarm with a revised pivot point keeps the back end planted and at the owner’s request, the forks are gold-finished Öhlins items. The wheels are equally high-spec models from Dymag. The bike does regular duty at the Tsukuba Circuit, where it reportedly eats CBRs and R1s for lunch.

    You can get the full spec of QuickSilver in this PDF. And although Harley-Davidson seems to be heading in the right direction now with its styling and marketing, it would do well to take a cue from companies like Sundance—and start working on the performance and handling of its bikes.

    [Thanks to Adam Kauffman for updated information following the original article. Images courtesy of Hardcore Chopper magazine. Spotted on Knucklebuster.]









  4. #54
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    Buell RR1000R
    http://www.bikeexif.com/buell-racing#more-11869



    This is a beast with a convoluted history. It’s one of just three racing RR1000s produced by Erik Buell before the road version was released in the late 80s. The story starts with the Harley Owners Group, which asked Buell to make a chassis for a race bike using the Harley-Davidson XR engine: the rise in engine capacity from 750 to 1000cc for AMA BoTT racing had made the XR750 uncompetitive against most European high-performance motorcycles. So Buell designed an XR1000-powered bike with racing in mind. It appeared in 1986 and was known as “Lucifer’s Hammer II”, or more formally, the RR1000.


    The RR1000 was a very small bike, with a wheelbase of only 136cm and a steering head angle of 25 degrees. It rolled on 16” magnesium wheels and Marzocchi M1R or WP upside-down forks, with the rear suspension placed under the engine. The engine is positioned high and forward, and mounted in the chassis using a ‘Uniplaner’ system designed to isolate the chassis from vibrations. The bike has a dry weight of 180kg, a 55° maximum angle of lean, and a maximum speed recorded at Daytona of about 280kph.


    The racer we’re looking at here was in boxes when Roberto Crepaldi of CR&S bought it directly from Erik Buell in 1992. After the parts arrived in Italy, CR&S spent two years restoring the bike and then put it up for auction at Bonhams in 2004. The man who owns it now is Englishman Steve Ledsham, who’s raced this RR1000R at Spa, Mallory Park and Brands Hatch: “I can say it goes, brakes and handles superbly,” he reports. Ledsham is currently undoing some of the CR&S mods and taking the RR1000 back to period race specification. “The forks, wheels, tanks and brakes were sourced in Italy and not Buell supplied,” he notes. Once Ledsham has finished restoring the bike, it’ll be for sale. Any takers?


    Specification
    Engine: XR1000-based engine with cutaway timing case giving access to the oil pump (high delivery type) and later primary cases which are better for racing (narrower). The crankcases have been strengthened in the usual places. The crankshaft has been reworked and now has race connecting rods from Carrillo.

    XR cylinder heads have been reworked with twin plugs, ported with bigger titanium valves angled at 60 degrees and operated by roller cam followers, pushrods and rocker arms. Gases are supplied by two 40mm Mikuni flat slide carburettors. The gases are carried away by a Buell “works” exhaust system.

    Each cylinder barrel has been lightened and a “Gilardoni” forged piston fitted (intended for a Ducati). The motor has a displacement of 997.10 cc. with 81mm bore X 96.80mm stroke, and four Storz camshafts with eccentric adjustment. Gearbox is standard but carefully assembled. A modified XR clutch and chain primary are fitted. The engine running on race fuel (115 octane) produces 94HP, with incredible delivery due to an almost flat torque curve.

    Chassis: Buell RR1000 chassis none VIN and preproduction. The rear swing arm is of the type designed by Erik Buell for the Pirelli radial tyre in 1986. It’s approximately 50mm longer than the road RR1000 swing arm. Forks are very special 42 mm upside-down Ohlins: these are the rare early type used by many of the GP and WSB teams in the late 80s. Rear shock is Ohlins fully adjustable.

    Other Chassis Parts: The fairing was made of composite material especially for this RR1000. The fuel tank is handmade and alloy, produced by Giancarlo Berti. The engine oil tank was also made specifically and placed under the saddle, while the original version was positioned at the front under the engine.

    All linkages, fittings and brackets are handmade for this bike.







  5. #55
    Oberon
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    Some motorcycles are exercises in simplicity. This is the Mac Motorcycles (of the UK) Spud.


  6. #56
    Oberon
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    Obviously akin to the Mac Spud is this one-off bobber, using the same Buell Blast powertrain parts to somewhat different effect.


  7. #57
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    I'm a big fan of bobbers... and this one also has classic race livery (an homage to the Gulf Oil GT40's of yesteryear).

    I think this is a really classy bike, and I bet you'll agree.

    DP Customs Gulf Bobber
    http://www.bikeexif.com/harley-ironhead



    A couple of months ago, DP Customs’ 1979 Harley café racer was a king hit with Bike EXIF readers. So here’s the latest machine from the Arizona outfit: it’s also a ’79 ironhead, but with a totally different vibe. According to DP’s Justin Del Prado, “We started with the idea of building a low slung, stripped down bobber and wanted to incorporate some ideas from the classic Steve McQueen movie Le Mans. We really love that race era, and try to let it show through some of our bikes.” DP tore the stock ’79 apart, chopped the frame and hard-tailed the rear. (“This keeps the factory numbers vs. going with an off-the-shelf aftermarket frame.”) The bike sits 4″ lower and longer than stock. DP laced the wheels (21″ and 16″), built the exhaust, and created the paint and graphics with simplicity in mind. “We’re not into cluttered bikes with too much going on.”

    The motor is basically stock with electronic ignition and a performance coil. It ran well to begin with, so DP just cleaned it up and replaced all the seals. The rims and handlebars are powdercoated, while the rest of the bike is painted. Anything that started out polished was worked over with abrasives to tone it down and give the bobber a raw, vintage feel. “Because of its ride height and rigid frame, it’s obviously not made for road racing or cross country tours,” says Del Prado. “It was built for shorter rides around town in nice weather. However, the Biltwell solo seat is so comfortable, you could ride this bike longer than you would think.” The Gulf Bobber is now for sale for $10,000—and I don’t think it’ll be hanging around the DP yard for long.







  8. #58
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    BMW custom: R1232
    http://www.bikeexif.com/bmw-r1200-custom



    Most motorcycle marques can point to a single early model that set the tone for those that followed and established the brand. In BMW’s case it’s the R32. It was unveiled at the Berlin motor show in 1923, and it was a good fifty years later before BMW Motorrad shook off the R32′s iconic black-paint-and-pinstripes look. This ‘R1232’ is a very unusual custom built by a team led by Jean-Luc Dupont of the French BMW dealer Panda Moto 89. Jean-Luc is based in Villeneuve-Sur-Yonne, south east of Paris, and he’s known for creating BMW customs based on current production models.

    According to the BMW Motorcycle Owners of America website, ‘Jean-Luc had the idea of creating a modern interpretation of the R32 using current technology. This would be a complete motorcycle design and production exercise, and would require everything to be fabricated … “Harley-Davidson has built its reputation on having their motorcycles as a modern interpretation of the past. I wanted to do the same for BMW, and where better to start than BMW’s first motorcycle, the R32?” said Jean-Luc.’

    It’s interesting to compare the specifications of the original R32 with Jean-Luc’s creation. The 1923 bike had 8.5hp and weighed 122kg. The R1232 has 107 horses and weighs 235kg (520 lbs), which is reasonable by today’s standards. So the power-to-weight ratio has increased by more than six-fold. (The six-speed gearbox will ease progress even further.) If there’s a question mark, it’ll be over the braking system and the 2.5” wide tires, which roll on 21” rims at the front and 19” at the back. But then again, you can’t have everything. The R1232 took US$95,000, 16 months and over 600 hours of work to create, and you’ll find the full specification (in French) and more photos on the Panda Moto website. [Images by David Ducastel.]







  9. #59
    Oberon
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    The Vincent Black Lightning was the racing version of the Vincent Black Shadow and the top-dog fastest factory motorcycle of the 1950s.



    There's even a song about the Vincent Black Lightning. I'll let y'all google that one yourselves.

  10. #60
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    I'm especially fond of street bikes with racing livery such as:

    The Repsol Honda
    Funny, I was about to post just that.

    -------

    I tend to like "sleaker" motorcycles, which often translate to sports bikes.




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