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  1. #11
    Senior Member LEGERdeMAIN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Tater View Post
    A man walks into the gardening department of a supermarket and asks "May I have a package of tree seeds?"

    The clerk withdraws into the back room and comes back with a small bag of orange seeds.

    The man says, "This is not what I asked for".

    The man intended to purchase apple seeds, but because he did not know the word "apple", he could not specify to communicate clearly.

    And so, the world adopted the Latin language for taxonomy and pharmaceuticals; establishing a universal mode of communication.

    But when the Japanese implemented their katakana alphabet, confusion about specific medications ensued; and some unfortunate souls lost their lives.
    I think you're some kind of occultist.
    “Some people will tell you that slow is good – but I’m here to tell you that fast is better. I’ve always believed this, in spite of the trouble it’s caused me. Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube. That is why God made fast motorcycles, Bubba…”


  2. #12
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marduk View Post
    I think you're some kind of occultist.


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  3. #13
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    This thread reminds me how sometimes on english-speaking internet forums I'm perceived as cultured because I frequently use latin-origined words, while the real reason is that they're easier to remember for me, since they're almost identical to those of my mother tongue.

    Anyway let's see. Plenary:

    ple?na?ry
    ??/?plin?ri, ?pl?n?-/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [plee-nuh-ree, plen-uh-]
    1. full; complete; entire; absolute; unqualified: plenary powers.
    2. attended by all qualified members; fully constituted: a plenary session of Congress.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    This thread reminds me how sometimes on english-speaking internet forums I'm perceived as cultured because I frequently use latin-origined words, while the real reason is that they're easier to remember for me, since they're almost identical to those of my mother tongue.

    Anyway let's see. Plenary:

    ple?na?ry
    ??/?plin?ri, ?pl?n?-/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [plee-nuh-ree, plen-uh-]
    1. full; complete; entire; absolute; unqualified: plenary powers.
    2. attended by all qualified members; fully constituted: a plenary session of Congress.
    In another post directed at you, I originally wrote provocate instead of provoke. I was intrigued whether bother were correct and a quick google search had shown me that provocate is not an english word at all but an italian one. I thought about leaving it as it were to see if you'd notice.

  5. #15
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaunward View Post
    In another post directed at you, I originally wrote provocate instead of provoke. I was intrigued whether bother were correct and a quick google search had shown me that provocate is not an english word at all but an italian one. I thought about leaving it as it were to see if you'd notice.
    Ahah, yeah well, I can't really distinguish since I tend to mash up the two languages too, for obvious reasons. "provocate" tho is not the same as "provoke" because it's like, exclusively used for 2nd person plural of present tense (voi provocate), so I think I just thought it was correct in english...

    btw here it says provocate actually exists in english: Provocate Definition | Definition of Provocate at Dictionary.com , however it's not used in many english-speaking webpages...
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    Ahah, yeah well, I can't really distinguish since I tend to mash up the two languages too, for obvious reasons. "provocate" tho is not the same as "provoke" because it's like, exclusively used for 2nd person plural of present tense (voi provocate), so I think I just thought it was correct in english...

    btw here it says provocate actually exists in english: Provocate Definition | Definition of Provocate at Dictionary.com , however it's not used in many english-speaking webpages...
    My google search was very brief.

    I grew up learning english and norwegian at home as a tot. I later studied the swedish and danish because I figured it'd be relatively easy to do. In university to fulfill a language course requirement, I opted for german. I know all too well the experience of mixing up languages.

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