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  1. #111
    The Unwieldy Clawed One Falcarius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    Well look here, we got ourselves one of those self-hating Jews.
    Seriously, I don't hate Jews but rather I just get annoyed people keep asking me if I am Jewish.

    P.S.

    Why did my family have to move to the suburb of London Karl Marx is buried in and down the road from where Sigmund Freud lived and was cremated?
    Quote Originally Posted by Thalassa View Post
    Oh our 3rd person reference to ourselves denotes nothing more than we realize we are epic characters on the forum.

    Narcissism, plain and simple.

  2. #112
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    pretty much 1/2 russian some portion scottish and some portion I don't know.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  3. #113
    IRL is not real Cimarron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anja View Post
    A thought I've had only recently is that, although somewhere in my past I have an English degree, when I type I notice that my colloquial English is not grammatically correct.

    I wish I could think of an example right now. It's a matter of misplaced phrases, for one.

    But I wonder if that didn't come from learning my spoken English from people who were speaking it as a second language.
    Ohh, I see where you're going with that. That's a fascinating suggestion, I wouldn't have thought of that!
    You can't spell "justice" without ISTJ.

  4. #114
    Senior Member ZiL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcarius View Post
    Seriously, I don't hate Jews but rather I just get annoyed people keep asking me if I am Jewish.
    This has happened to me on a few occasions too. But I have no idea why besides the fact that my nose isn't small. That's not the best reason though, lol, but I'm not sure what these other people are thinking. I guess I do look sort of ethnically ambiguous - you could read in my face a lot of things that aren't there.

    My last name also really confuses people. It's German originally but people always think it is Spanish or Portuguese, and since I can speak Spanish with a pretty convincing accent, I always get asked if it's in my background. Only my German teachers have figured out the truth on their own.

    Name anglicization can cause huge trouble when doing genealogy. Stuff like Braun > Brown and Brasher > Brassieur which result in needing to look for a whole different ethnic background.

  5. #115
    Senior Member ZiL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anja View Post
    How influenced are we by our predeccesor's being immigrants?

    A thought I've had only recently is that, although somewhere in my past I have an English degree, when I type I notice that my colloquial English is not grammatically correct.

    I wish I could think of an example right now. It's a matter of misplaced phrases, for one.

    But I wonder if that didn't come from learning my spoken English from people who were speaking it as a second language.
    If you could think of an example of phrasing sometime, that would be great.

    It's for sure that accents are effected by that, though. My grandpa from Minnesota speaks with that distinct Scandinavian-tinged lilt common to the area, and his parents and grandparents all spoke German initially. My grandma came from New Orleans which has an accent that is sometimes confused with NYC accents. New Orleans had a similar immigrant composition to that of NYC, and so you can get mirroring accents in vastly different parts of the country. I've noticed that some people from the Pacific northwest have Minnesota-like accents, because a lot of Scandinavian immigrants went there too (see travel host Rick Steves for an example).

  6. #116
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anja View Post
    How influenced are we by our predeccesor's being immigrants?

    A thought I've had only recently is that, although somewhere in my past I have an English degree, when I type I notice that my colloquial English is not grammatically correct.

    I wish I could think of an example right now. It's a matter of misplaced phrases, for one.

    But I wonder if that didn't come from learning my spoken English from people who were speaking it as a second language.
    My grandmother used to have some very quaint ways of saying things because she would think in French, translate in her head, then say it in English, so grammatically, it was structured as a French sentence but in English it did come out sounding a little different since the grammar rules in French are different than for English.

    Every so often my mom would say a word that she learned from a book but had never heard spoken and she would have some pretty strange pronunciations.

  7. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiL View Post
    This has happened to me on a few occasions too. But I have no idea why besides the fact that my nose isn't small. That's not the best reason though, lol, but I'm not sure what these other people are thinking. I guess I do look sort of ethnically ambiguous - you could read in my face a lot of things that aren't there.

    My last name also really confuses people. It's German originally but people always think it is Spanish or Portuguese, and since I can speak Spanish with a pretty convincing accent, I always get asked if it's in my background. Only my German teachers have figured out the truth on their own.

    Name anglicization can cause huge trouble when doing genealogy. Stuff like Braun > Brown and Brasher > Brassieur which result in needing to look for a whole different ethnic background.
    You think that's bad, trying going around with a Polish name that nobody can pronounce if their life depended on it. I was teased a lot for that in school, but in a way it further strengthened being proud of my heritage.

  8. #118
    Senior Member Nighthawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    You think that's bad, trying going around with a Polish name that nobody can pronounce if their life depended on it. I was teased a lot for that in school, but in a way it further strengthened being proud of my heritage.
    My parents named me an obscure German name that was rather goofy sounding. The last and middle names were not much better. Always a great source of class amusement whenever substitute teacher tried to pronounce any of them. It gave me a thick skin, but I did have my first name changed in court after I became an adult.

  9. #119
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    My daughter has an American friend of German descent whose last name is Macho. For the longest time I thought she was Hispanic.

    Interesting to hear that Russ is English. That's not what I was told down-home. Think I'll dig around some later and see what else I can find out about that. I do know several Norwegian-Americans with that last name.

    I've been asked in several parts of the US if I've come from Norway. And don't even get me started on German-American English. I've lived in this predominantly German-American town for three decades and can do it very well, too, yet, even, then, still. Uffdah. (Incidently any of those words at the end of a sentence add meaning to it, I've noticed.)

    Another thing about that Norse accent is that I notice it in the English of our Indian Dakota tribes. While it was mostly the English and French, I think, who may have taught them English, they sure sound Scandinavian to me. Lived cheek-to-jowl with a lot of early farmers, I think.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  10. #120
    Resident Snot-Nose GZA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ByMySword View Post
    But you could say that about any heritage.

    If you have Mexican heritage, then you probably have Spanish as well.

    If you have English, then you have Celtic plus Anglo-Saxon, Norman, and even Viking heritage from time period when Germanic tribes settled there.

    And I bet almost everyone from European descent has a little Roman in them as well.

    We act like America was the first melting pot, but it wasn't. The whole world has been a melting pot since time began.

    You invade a country; you sack their cities; you rape, pillage, and plunder; and then you settle down and assimilate into the society. Thats how its been for thousands of years.
    I agree with you absolutely. I was talking to my mom about this just tonight at dinner. But Canada is a melting pot, and this melting pot is still my heritage. It isn't the peices of the melting pot that is our heritage, it is the stew itself. When you mix it all up, you get Canada, and thats what my heritage is.

    Very few people I've ever spoken to mention in their european history all the migrating people who came through, because that would probably take six months and the result is still a somewhat unique group of people.

    So if it has been mixed so much, what is the purpose of naming names in the first place? Is Scotch-Irisih not meaningless if the Scotish and Irish are really just french, scandanavian, german, ect, and those groups themselves are all mixed with slovak people, west asians, italians, north africans, arabs, ect? I think it comes down to culture and how relevant it really is to your heritage. Heritage is more about culture then anything, I think. For Canada the heritage is a bunch of french guys and a bunch of english guys crossing the ocean and starting a fur trade (thats the short of it, anyway). It's the culture that is the heritage more then anything; how the natives, english, and french interacted, how they became culturally seperate from their homelands, how their attitudes to england and france changed as we became more independant, blah blah blah. It's similar to how some people say they are simply "american" because they are mixed race/culture (although my family has almost no mixture at all that I'm aware of), we say we are simply Canadian because we have lived here for a long time and it is our family's story.

    I see that you are saying the melting pot factor doesn't matter and that the interesting part about heritage is finding the peices of the stew of the pot, but I think that in a melting pot that is getting more and more mixed every day (like Canada -immigration and multiculturalism is huge), it is the pot itself, past and present, that is the heritage.

    Bleh, now I'm getting confused by all this, hahahahahaha.

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