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View Poll Results: Do you think skinny jeans are a good thing?

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  • They're good for everyone

    8 50.00%
  • Maybe for women

    6 37.50%
  • Nobody. Not even the sexually confused.

    2 12.50%
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Thread: Skinny jeans.

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    Do you think that the entire Western world dresses the same, and will always dress the same? Following the same trend path? I think you will find that there are things that have long been fashionable in one Western country, that will never be acceptable elsewhere. For example, one thing I noticed about Germany when I visited there, is that older women frequently dye their hair bright and unnatural colors. Which I thought was fun and interesting -- but would not be acceptable at all in your average American city, where it would be seen as "too young".
    Yes, I do, but clearly I am missing the subtle differences in fashions that a woman hones in on.

    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    Regarding skinny jeans -- their appeal will depend greatly based on the general style of the region. Where I'm from, the Rocky Mountains in the US, was not super friendly to it, but there was a small subset of young adults who hopped onto the bandwagon. By contrast, @Noll mentioned that everyone where he is will wear skinny jeans because Sweden is "metrosexual heaven".
    I think you are mixing up correlation with causation here.

    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    I don't know about New Zealand, but in the US there's a VERY large percentage of people who will reject fashion that they see as "too European", because they see it as too effeminate. American men generally don't follow men's fashion trends unless they mesh with their masculine self-image. I think it would take a LOT of re-branding to make skinny jeans acceptable for the average American man.
    Following fashion for the sake of it is a sign of effeminacy. Your second sentence pretty much describes my mentality.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    That's interesting. Just about everywhere else I've traveled besides North America -- Europe, the Middle East -- guys of all sexual orientations wore clothes that I would have associated with gay men in America. My gaydar stopped working completely.
    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    I don't know about New Zealand, but in the US there's a VERY large percentage of people who will reject fashion that they see as "too European", because they see it as too effeminate. American men generally don't follow men's fashion trends unless they mesh with their masculine self-image.
    That was my impression as well and I find it very interesting. As a European woman, my view on this is that I prefer to see jeans on men that are tighter than they are worn in America but not quite as tight as those in the OP photo. It's nice when you can get an idea of a man's figure from his cloths. What I consider an absolute no-go and a fashion crime is baggy pants. Don't get me started on how they make the handsomest of men look like an infantile idiot and are a complete turn-off!!!!! Sports cloths outside sports activities are also highly unattractive, but that is a different topic. It is probably true that men here tend to groom differently (not necessarily always more but differently, more visibly so).

    Last night MH and I saw John Kerry on tv and joked about he is sometimes said to look like guy smiley. That reminded my of the chin of American Dad (a caricature, of course) and made me think about the American ideal of male beauty. It does seem like Americans tend to prefer a different, apparently more extreme, form of masculinity both in appearance and in looks and sometimes tend towards stronger gender stereotypes than Western Europeans.

    As a hetero female I am sexually and romantically attracted to males and masculinity, but my idea of what the perfect degree of masculinity in a male looks like differs from what the average American would consider ideal. Some of that might be type related and some of it cultural. An analysis of the reasons would be where things get really interesting but might also derail this thread too much.

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  3. #53
    this is my winter song EJCC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullervo View Post
    Yes, I do, but clearly I am missing the subtle differences in fashions that a woman hones in on.
    Glad to contribute my feminine wisdom to this worthy cause.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kullervo View Post
    I think you are mixing up correlation with causation here.
    I wasn't trying to make any sort of point about causation in that part of my quote. My point (causation bit included) was that various places embrace various fashions, and may never embrace certain fashions to the extent that others do -- often because of philosophies that you wouldn't initially associate with fashion at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kullervo View Post
    Following fashion for the sake of it is a sign of effeminacy. Your second sentence pretty much describes my mentality.
    I don't think it's as much a sign of effeminacy in other parts of the world. And it also depends on what sort of fashion you're talking about. I know quite a few masculine, heterosexual, and gentlemanly men who know a bit about the history of men's suits and tailoring. Probably because suits don't have the anti-masculine stigma that other clothing items do, at least in the US.
    Last edited by EJCC; 07-20-2014 at 04:43 PM. Reason: Clarification on causation
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  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    Glad to contribute my feminine wisdom to this worthy cause.


    I wasn't trying to make any sort of point about causation. Only that various places embrace various fashions, and may never embrace certain fashions to the extent that others do -- often because of philosophies that you wouldn't initially associate with fashion at all.


    I don't think it's as much a sign of effeminacy in other parts of the world. If it is, then they don't see "effeminacy" as something for men to constantly avoid, like you do.
    To give a bit of general context: when I first went to Central Europe on a holiday (and have now been three times), I was surprised about how similar the people were in how they dressed, at least the ones my age. I had got the impression that they'd be this entirely alien species. This was further confirmed when I made friends from Belgium and Germany through my nationalist connections, and learned that they eat a lot of fried food just like there is here or in the US (yuck!), are addicted to Call of Duty and one of them is a compulsive movie watcher. It is only when I went to non-Western countries that I encountered utterly alien people in reality.

    So what I'm saying is that I suspect a lot of the differences in mentality can be put down to more recent changes in society. To take the example of Sweden, the Vikings were supreme badasses and I doubt they would've approved of the metrosexual movement. Sweden also used to be a major power in Europe. So, I think European countries becoming the most socialist is responsible for their embrace of androgynous fashion.

    Men in NZ identify very strongly with STP-ish things like rugby, physical strength and stoicism.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullet View Post
    Clearly, you haven't seen this little number.

    Now that's the mark of a real man! ;P

  6. #56
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    My clothes generally have the two following qualities.
    1)Free/Cheap
    2)Functional

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullervo View Post
    Men in NZ identify very strongly with STP-ish things like rugby, physical strength and stoicism.
    Men do here as well, particularly football and bodybuilding. There's a lot of buff guys at my school, actually the majority of them are. 'Faggot' is a common derogatory term here, and guys here tend to laugh at 'wimpy' or 'twee' males, or loser book nerds commonly hanging out in the library (people like me). They just don't think skinny jeans and an emphasis on grooming is a bad thing. But I think generally people are a lot more accepting here still, these jocks have tried befriending me multiple times. I usually eat lunch with them! Funny, I view myself as a loser, still I always eat lunch with the most popular guys and girls. I keep my distance though, conversation with them isn't very stimulating. And well, objectively attractive people are scary.

  8. #58
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    I don't wear skinny jeans because I don't appreciate my balls getting squashed when I sit down, nor the outline of my "stuff" being too obvious.
    Levi's 505 provide sufficient room for movement & camouflage.

    but women look great in skinny jeans.
    http://newstyle4all.com/wp-content/u...in-Klein-1.jpg

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6...9003970b-300wi

    skinny jeans were created for this type individual
    http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/73...768d64321d.jpg

    not for guys to end up twisted in a knot LOL
    Skinny jeans may lead to 'twisted testicles' and other painful health problems for style-conscious men - NY Daily News

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