User Tag List

First 5678917 Last

Results 61 to 70 of 362

Thread: Vegetarianism

  1. #61
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    yupp
    Posts
    29,776

    Default

    My mom was vegetarian starting beginning of college until she married my dad who was a meat and potatoes guy a the way. He wasn't happy unless dinner was some form of beef and some type of potato. He'd eat other things but suggest anything asian or anything he'd never heard of forget it. I did make pad Thai which he loved he'd always at least get seconds which is the only time he'd eat tofu. So my mom instead of cooking two meals she just started eating meat again.

    He claimed to hate chicken but he'd eat it. And his reasoning was they had it too often growing up. Also he didn't like spaghetti because they never had it as it was foreign food. My aunt informed me that they had spaghetti pretty regularly and in central ky in the 50s it wasn't considered foreign. My dad was a strange man when it came to food.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  2. #62
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    729 sx/sp
    Socionics
    IEE Ne
    Posts
    5,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I actually went vegan for about six months a while back. I did it for health reasons but it didn't improve my health. I felt terrible and was hungry literally all the time. I have a history of eating disorder and it really lit up while I was trying to be a vegan. If someone feels better and is healthier on a vegan diet, wonderful- but it's not the case for everyone.
    this is what i fear if i were to go vegetarian. that so much focus on my diet would trigger disordered eating tendencies. i don't eat much meat normally, just because of preference. i can't imagine going vegan though, milk and egg products would be very difficult and expensive to replace i'd imagine. i gravitate toward meatless meals, and think my body's natural cravings do pretty well at keeping me nourished.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  3. #63
    i love skylights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 so/sx
    Socionics
    EII Ne
    Posts
    7,835

    Default

    I was a vegetarian on and off for years between the ages of 10 and 20, and vegan for a month.

    My experiences with it are that it is morally satisfying and it opened me up to a lot of great new foods, but it is more challenging and more expensive to maintain than an omnivorous diet. When being vegetarian, I spent a lot of time and effort ensuring that I was getting adequate protein in my diet. You have to get used to eating a lot of eggs, cheese, beans, nuts, and soy for the protein (if vegan, the latter three). I also took B12 supplements. It was really easy to eat way too many carbs! On the bright side, I discovered a lot of my favorite foods (cheddar soy burgers) and healthy alternatives (almond milk), and my omnivorous diet is much better for that. The best cake I have ever had - of any cake ever - actually ended up being a vegan strawberry cake I found at a little vegetarian cafe one day. So there are definitely perks to including veggie cuisine in one's diet! :] I also got really good at becoming versatile - when your food choices are restricted, you learn how to be more creative and more tolerant, as well as being more open to new things.

    Personally, I'm not veggie right now - I'm working on overhauling my overall health and eating a lot of lean meat, and it's really hard to beat chicken in terms of availability, cost, and nutrition. I'll definitely consider going back to a more veggie lifestyle once I'm not working to put myself through school and scrounging for pennies. I don't think I'll ever go fully vegetarian again, though, much less vegan (which I didn't find worth it at all). I care about animal welfare, but I'm okay with eating meat for food. I just think preferably we'd do less of it because it's more resource-demanding, and then with those saved resources we could focus on better animal living conditions.

    So that's my take on it, basically - pleasing but expensive if you're gonna do it right.

    And there is judgment from both sides. As a vegetarian I got more crap from meat-eaters than I ever did as a meat-eater from vegetarians. But I've also met my fair share of vegetarians who were elitist, competitive, and pushy about their food choices. In general, I feel that while information-sharing is fine, a live-and-let-live attitude is better for everyone.

  4. #64
    Senior Member lue's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    111

    Default

    I'd very much love it if our society would actually come to a point where it embraced the Native American view on these matters - embrace Nature, embrace life, take only what you need - with respect and deference - and give back just as much, if only because we are solely dependent of this planet and its inhabitants.
    Agreed. Is it ok that I quoted one of your spoiler things? Not sure. I'm new here.

  5. #65
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    Enfp
    Enneagram
    497 sx/so
    Socionics
    IEE Fi
    Posts
    14,657

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lue View Post
    Agreed. Is it ok that I quoted one of your spoiler things? Not sure. I'm new here.
    Sure it is
    ★ڿڰۣ✿ℒoѵℯ✿ڿڰۣ★





    "Harm none, do as ye will”

  6. #66
    Senior Member lue's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    Sure it is

  7. #67
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,877

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyyukon View Post
    I think when I get much older, I'd consider switching to vegan or vegetarianism as it seems (really IS) much easier to digest.
    I had the opposite reaction to it. My stomach was frequently upset, and I had to very carefully choose which fruits/vegetables I ate in what order and when to avoid GI upset. I found myself frequently bloated feeling (which helped me at the time because it kept me from being hungry during classes), and while my mood was improved with eating it was negated soon after by constantly having to work around stomach irritation. It was just too many vegetables, and eating too frequently, for me to get the nutrition, calories, and benefits.

    Since reading Senza's post about vegetarianism, and my adverse experience into vegan/raw eating, I've been doing a lot of thinking about body adaptations based on not-so-distant ancestral dietary make ups, and how the body evolves to adapt to particular diets--spicy, vegetarian-based meals with Indian decent vs high volumes of corn in particular with fatty meats in Hispanic decent, Asians having such an adversity to milk and consuming high volumes of rice, and anglos slightly under-fed diets high in starches, sugars, and fat with bursts of random ingredients and meals. There stereotypical diets of recent ancestors having an influence on us and current problems with weight, diet, and auto-immune disorders based on our ability to access more variety of food and blending cultures together via food. It's an interesting thing to think about, and I hope to do a little bit of research on it when I get actual time in my life to do so.

    Medically, race/decent make a lot of biological factors--increased/decreased risks of x or y, etc. It doesn't seem a far stretch to think that different racial backgrounds benefit more from certain foods being brought to light and others being pushed away.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  8. #68
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,877

    Default

    @Amargith

    I was pondering this the other day when I was watching some chef that was telling people about some pink-slime thing with ammonia Mcdonalds uses for nuggets, or whatever it was about. I don't remember exactly.

    The part that stuck out to me was that he was talking about how there were parts of the cow "not fit for human consumption." That those were usually "dog/pig" parts. It's interesting to me how foodies and the food revolution is suppose to be all about eating higher quality food, to do some honor to the animals being eaten, and have some sanity in the process of being a meat eater. Yet, Native American mentality was to use ALL of the animal... to kill it, and then consider parts of it "unfit" for a human just doesn't seem like a logical leap to me. I far prefer the idea of using every part of the animal as a way of honoring it (waste not, want not), vs the idea that many foodies/religious personnel have that certain parts are just not edible for humans based on... whatever they're based on.

    While I know they say it is because those parts are more prone to being infectious and that more scavenger-like stomachs are more adept at handling that, we have modern cooking methods that would theoretically eliminate that risk, don't we? Currently fast food chains are using ammonia to rid it of diseases, but wouldn't many other methods also work? Or am I a bit off in that leap?

    Anyone else have an explanation for that?
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  9. #69
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    Enfp
    Enneagram
    497 sx/so
    Socionics
    IEE Fi
    Posts
    14,657

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    @Amargith

    I was pondering this the other day when I was watching some chef that was telling people about some pink-slime thing with ammonia Mcdonalds uses for nuggets, or whatever it was about. I don't remember exactly.

    The part that stuck out to me was that he was talking about how there were parts of the cow "not fit for human consumption." That those were usually "dog/pig" parts. It's interesting to me how foodies and the food revolution is suppose to be all about eating higher quality food, to do some honor to the animals being eaten, and have some sanity in the process of being a meat eater. Yet, Native American mentality was to use ALL of the animal... to kill it, and then consider parts of it "unfit" for a human just doesn't seem like a logical leap to me. I far prefer the idea of using every part of the animal as a way of honoring it (waste not, want not), vs the idea that many foodies/religious personnel have that certain parts are just not edible for humans based on... whatever they're based on.

    While I know they say it is because those parts are more prone to being infectious and that more scavenger-like stomachs are more adept at handling that, we have modern cooking methods that would theoretically eliminate that risk, don't we? Currently fast food chains are using ammonia to rid it of diseases, but wouldn't many other methods also work? Or am I a bit off in that leap?

    Anyone else have an explanation for that?
    Well, I can see the argument for 'quality of food'. It's a luxury we nowadays have and we shouldn't forget this wasn't always the case. But sure, wastefulness is not something to endorse either. I see no problem with some parts being 'for the dog or pig' if they are more suited to being able to digest something as that too would still be useful and not wasteful in that respect. Throwing however oodles of food away (as we do in Belgium for instance - the infamous 'Butter Mountain') because otherwise you loose your subsidies from the government if you don't make it yet there is no demand for it...that's insane. Especially with people starving in this world.

    Personally, the aspect that I especially was going for in that remark was...the respect for the animal - both by not wasting its sacrifice AND in the way in which it gets to live its life and is put down for our benefit.

    Regardless, we fail at all of the above as a society - in the most profound way possible.
    ★ڿڰۣ✿ℒoѵℯ✿ڿڰۣ★





    "Harm none, do as ye will”

  10. #70
    i love skylights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 so/sx
    Socionics
    EII Ne
    Posts
    7,835

    Default

    @kyuuei, I agree with you about using the whole animal, and I am right on with what @Amargith said about the Native American ideology, too. It is also weird to me that we shun eating a lot of parts. I mean, I'm not really feeling eating eyeballs because ew, texture, but why not eat the rest of it?

    It also strikes me that if we kept better animal living conditions, there would be less concern about disease and infection overall. And it would eliminate a lot of environmental concerns... here in the South where I live, pig farms are notorious for their toxicity and the way they wreak havoc on the environment if there are floods.

Similar Threads

  1. Vegetarian, scientist, or serial killer?
    By Gauche in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-22-2011, 05:44 PM
  2. Vegetarian? Why?
    By G-Virus in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 123
    Last Post: 06-11-2010, 03:50 AM
  3. Vegetarians anyone?
    By metaphours in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 87
    Last Post: 06-06-2010, 11:43 PM
  4. Vegetarian/Veganism
    By The Decline in forum Health and Fitness
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 05-14-2010, 09:03 AM
  5. Know any good vegetarian/vegan recipes?
    By TK* in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-07-2008, 03:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO