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  1. #11
    Senior Member Alea_iacta_est's Avatar
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    I've heard that there are some similarities between English and Frisian, a dialect in Germanic regions.

    Just look at all the similarities:

    Frysk blood, tsjoch op! Wol nouris brûz je en siede

    En bounz je troch ûs ieren om!

    Flean op, wy sjonge it bêste lân fan d'ierde,

    It Fryske lân fol eare en rom.

    Klink dan en daverje fier yn it roun,

    Dyn âlde eare, o Fryske groun!



    Trochloftich folk fan dizze ‬de namme,

    Wês jimmer op dy âl‬den great.

    Bliuw ivich fan dy grize hege stamme

    In grien, in krêftich duorjend leat.

    Klink dan en daverje fier yn it roun,

    Dyn âlde eare, o Fryske groun!
    First to translate it without knowledge of the language or finding the place this script came from with some degree of accuracy wins a cookie.

    Hint: The first four words mean "Frisian bloods come up"

    Oh, and just to show you how deceptively similar these two languages might actually be, I'll throw in an entire line.

    "Flean op, wy sjonge it bêste lân fan d'ierde"
    "Fly up, we sing of the best land on the earth"

  2. #12
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    Whenever I hear Swedish, Norwegian, or Danish, I can hear a bit of English phonetics.

    But then I heard Icelandic...that definitely sounds like it could be mistaken for English in terms of the softer consonants (they both have the "th" sound).

    Or maybe it sounds kinda like Dutch without the German guttural sounds (which Dutch has a lot more of...when I hear the Dutch speak, it sounds like they're choking, whereas German sounds more refined).

    I took German in school and I have a pretty good understanding of how the language works, but I forgot most of the vocabulary, apart from the ones that are obvious cognates with English, many of which no longer have the same meaning, owing to English's development on an isolated location away from continental Europe and constant war with the French.

  3. #13
    Sweet Ocean Cloud SD45T-2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    It sounds closer to Dutch IMO. I've never mistaken German for English, but I have overheard people speaking Dutch quietly in the corner and thought it they were muttering in English for a while.
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  4. #14
    Level 8 Propaganda Bot SpankyMcFly's Avatar
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    Ich habe hunger.

    I'm (have) hungry.

    There are definately some similarities. My understanding is that English is a mish-mash of Latin and Germanic.

    I was checking out Latin prefixes/suffixes the other day for my daughter and had NO idea how huge "their" influence was on our language. Check it out http://www.prefixsuffix.com/rootchart.php

    Sample:

    Prefix: a, ac, ad, af, ag, al, an, ap, as, at

    Means: to, toward, near, in addition to, by

    Examples: aside, accompany, adjust, aggression, allocate, annihilate, affix, associate, attend, adverb
    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents... Some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new Dark Age. " - H.P. Lovecraft

  5. #15
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    It depends upon where the English speaker is from. I would guess that there is a general noise it makes from a distance, but I know that some accents make strong use of rhotic R's where the R is obviously pronounced in the persons diction.

    The various North american dialects are generally rhotic, as are those of Scotland and Ireland, whereas in England most are non-rhotic, (words like 'water' for example generally become 'wartah with a soft sounding R'), apart from one or two such as the west country burr. I think also Ausralia and New Zealand are non-rhotic as well for the most part.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

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  6. #16
    Male johnnyyukon's Avatar
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    Man this thread is still goin on? Well my official opinion, after living in Germany for a year is, FUCK NO.
    I've had this ice cream bar, since I was a child!

    Each thought's completely warped
    I'm like a walkin', talkin', ouija board.

  7. #17
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    You know, even English doesn't sound like English sometimes. Have you heard Jamaican English? Or Irish English?

  8. #18
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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  9. #19
    Male johnnyyukon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasofy View Post
    Lmfao!

    So you know anything about the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis or Linguistic Relativity? Basically it says that the way a language is structured, and the way it sounds affects behavior and culture. Horny Spaniards, romantic italians, proper english people, and the Germans, that started the only two World Wars.
    I've had this ice cream bar, since I was a child!

    Each thought's completely warped
    I'm like a walkin', talkin', ouija board.

  10. #20
    Level 8 Propaganda Bot SpankyMcFly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasofy View Post
    Funny video. It highlights just how similar English is to other Latin derived languages, the 3 shown; France, Italy, Mexico. Granted English definitely has some German influences.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...h_PieChart.svg
    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents... Some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new Dark Age. " - H.P. Lovecraft

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