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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    Well, clearly all men should strive to look like He-Man,


  2. #32
    Level 8 Propaganda Bot SpankyMcFly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honor View Post
    Could you be more specific about what you think they are willing to say publicly vs. what they actually want?
    I think women in the U.S. tend to say they value non physical things "less" than they are actually valued. X Woman says she values 10 things, 5 are physical, i.e. face, hair, muscles etc. and 5 are not, i.e. romantic, affectionate etc. When placed in a preference by strength they SAY they value the non physicals MORE when the reality is, they value a hot body and parts in an equal amount as men.
    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents... Some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new Dark Age. " - H.P. Lovecraft

  3. #33
    Level 8 Propaganda Bot SpankyMcFly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    Well, clearly all men should strive to look like He-Man, and all women should strive to look like Barbie...

    I don't get it... what's the big deal???

    *takes shirtless selfie flexing in bathroom mirror*

    / Se @superunknown
    I'd like to suggest getting a Bow-Flex
    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents... Some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new Dark Age. " - H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #34
    A Mystery Jacques Le Paul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpankyMcFly View Post
    I think women in the U.S. tend to say they value non physical things "less" than they are actually valued. X Woman says she values 10 things, 5 are physical, i.e. face, hair, muscles etc. and 5 are not, i.e. romantic, affectionate etc. When placed in a preference by strength they SAY they value the non physicals MORE when the reality is, they value a hot body and parts in an equal amount as men.
    Agreed, from what I've seen in people.
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  5. #35
    Ratchet Ass Moon Fairy Comeback Girl's Avatar
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    When I was 11, I wanted to 'date' Orlando Bloom and no one else. Didn't care he was famous and a normal girl like me would never really meet him anyway, because I was determined to become famous to, so I could meet him anyway and date him. I also didn't care he probably wouldn't date me because of my age, because I thought I looked way older, at least 14, and come on, no one would've convinced me that Orlando Bloom would think some ancient 14 year old would be too young for him! And by the way, I was one of the first girls in my class who had boobs, so no way he would turn me down, I thought! So with this option of me dating someone like fucking Orlando Bloom, why on earth would I ever date boys my age who had a crush on me!?

    Looking back I think my standards were indeed too high.
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  6. #36
    Senior Member two cents's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpankyMcFly View Post
    I think women in the U.S. tend to say they value non physical things "less" than they are actually valued. X Woman says she values 10 things, 5 are physical, i.e. face, hair, muscles etc. and 5 are not, i.e. romantic, affectionate etc. When placed in a preference by strength they SAY they value the non physicals MORE when the reality is, they value a hot body and parts in an equal amount as men.
    I've seen this behavior too, in both men and women. I think there are actually two different factors in play here.

    One: people don't really know themselves and their preferences as well as they think they do. Dunning-Kruger at work even here.

    Two: whether or not someone values one trait more than the other is influenced to a large extent by where, on the continuum of that trait, any given person is.

    Example: let's say a woman says she values two traits, someone's body being hot and someone's excellent sense of humor. Let's say that she subjectively defines a hot body in a man as being both slim and muscular, and a good sense of humor as someone uttering sarcastic/ironic quips every so often that actually make her laugh. When presented with someone who is morbidly obese and is the funniest person she thinks she's ever met and someone who is of average build (not built or very slender, but also not fat), and a sense of humor that she appreciates but doesn't find spectacular. Depending on how much the fat guy's body turns her off, she would not necessarily be misrepresenting her tastes or priorities by choosing the average guy. The difference being, one of these simply doesn't live up to her standards, but does not actively offend her sensibilities, while the other one lives up to her standards in one category, but is so far off the mark on the other one that it becomes a dealbreaker. She may still prefer a guy with an average body and an excellent sense of humor to a guy with a really hot body and an average sense of humor.

    You cannot assume that valuing one trait more than another actually means that the less important trait can be completely disregarded. Less important doesn't mean NOT important.
    And that's my two cents on the subject.

  7. #37
    Level 8 Propaganda Bot SpankyMcFly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by two cents View Post
    You cannot assume that valuing one trait more than another actually means that the less important trait can be completely disregarded. Less important doesn't mean NOT important.
    I do not assume this, nor do I think I implied it.

    I don't disagree with the explanation you've provided as to how different desirable traits are reconciled during mate selection.

    My point was and is that women (in the U.S.) say one thing then act on another. This confuses the hell outta me on a personal level and I'm sure "most" men, even when "we" factor for it.
    Last edited by SpankyMcFly; 12-14-2013 at 05:15 PM. Reason: qualified women
    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents... Some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new Dark Age. " - H.P. Lovecraft

  8. #38
    Senior Member two cents's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpankyMcFly View Post
    My point was and is that women (in the U.S.) say one thing then act on another. This confuses the hell outta me on a personal level and I'm sure "most" men, even when "we" factor for it.
    I have also been confused by this (men are just as guilty of doing it to women as the other way around). I guess my personal confusion boils down to not knowing, in any given situation, how much either of the two things (not knowing what they want vs reconciling various traits) affects the specific decision I'm facing.

    Mostly I deal with the confusion by re-iterating to myself that whatever their reasons happen to be and even if they run counter to prior information, the salient point is the rejection. When someone wants something (or doesn't want it), it seems completely pointless to argue about their reasons for it. Even if your reason for interrogating their motives is your own piece of mind, you only piss people off by pointing out their inconsistencies, and that makes them unlikely to accommodate you in any way. I find it pretty unfortunate, but I've yet to find the one weird trick to get the information I want, so I just shut up and go brood on my own.
    And that's my two cents on the subject.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by palm View Post
    @superunknown

    Meh. I see it as a commercialization of the creative relationship human beings have imbued into the expression of the human body. That's my initial thought. It's not supposed to be realistic. Think of the Woman of Willendorf -- there is debate whether the statuette was a mimetic representation or as an expression of the cultural ideals. The figurine can be interpreted as a good luck charm - a robust figure for a wandering society, where necessity dictates constant movement, making such a figure hard to come by. These images are cultural artifacts.
    This makes me think of @RaptorWizard's Abstract Ballsack Simulation - that cultural standards are mere superholographic simulations of a collectively projected ego!

    I think the only point was to show the disparity of attention the male's condition can get, for example, how often mental illness can be dismissed, even by those experiencing it, under the presumption of "not being man enough".

  10. #40
    ndovjtjcaqidthi
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    Quote Originally Posted by superunknown View Post
    This makes me think of @RaptorWizard's Abstract Ballsack Simulation - that cultural standards are mere superholographic simulations of a collectively projected ego!
    Yes.. Very good.

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