Quote Originally Posted by AffirmitiveAnxiety View Post
Good questions, for the first I will answer that as a feeler myself I can describe the choice of what is valued as basically being not a choice at all. It is whatever invokes the most immediate emotional reaction in myself, this does not have to be intense it can be as small as picking up one of my models and feeling satisfaction at the painting I have realised from my imagination or the concepts that the model invoked in me when I saw and then bought it.
How then do you separate things that feel good in the moment, say rolling over in bed on Monday morning instead of going to work; vs. what you "know" to be right, in this case getting up and going to work? What causes you to place greater value on the second choice than the first (presuming you do)? Many people give reasons like not wanting to get fired, or specific obligations they have at work that day, but these are based in objective considerations, not emotions.

Quote Originally Posted by AffirmitiveAnxiety View Post
So in everything a little bit of chemical reaction is tied up with it and it is hard for me to escape that. As for the second question I don't know, I suppose there is no reason why not, but it depends upon awareness of what emotions actually are and they are more than just the extremes of our responses.
Do you think that's all emotions are - chemical reactions?

Quote Originally Posted by AffirmitiveAnxiety View Post
I understand what you mean, but most feelers are never trained in the concepts of logic or how they work, besides my simplification of type was more my projection as an Fe dom. I find trying to distance myself impersonally and engage with the world in a logical fashion a massive strain on my well being and mind.
How common do you think it is for thinkers to be trained in the concepts of emotions and how they work? Our society, at least in the workplace, seems to place more value on T-related attributes than F-related ones. As a result, there is more pressure on Fs to develop objective thinking skills than on Ts to develop empathy and emotional sensitivity. I agree that dealing with the world objectively is overall more beneficial, but that is likely just a reflection of my own strong T preference. (How's that for objectivity!)