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  1. #11
    Glycerine
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    Read the abstract, introduction, hypothesis, and conclusion first to get a basic picture of they are trying to research. Then read the discussion and everything else.

    Try to convey what the author is saying in less words than they are using (most of the time, research articles are rather convoluted anyways).

    Only use the jargon if there isn't another word that captures the same nuance/concept.

    If you are resourceful enough, you don't need to use quotes at all. Learn the art of paraphrasing (and giving credit).

    This is from a psychology major.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Such Irony View Post
    My problem when writing papers was that sometimes the articles themselves word it the best and if I try to reword it myself then some of the intended meaning might be lost.
    Yeah, I feel ya on that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Usehername View Post
    I have this rule.


    A lot of college students have zero critical thinking going on, either because they are unprepared or shouldn't be there, and that's a problem. College students need to be able to demonstrate that they can meaningfully engage with the ideas that are being talked about, and direct quoting gets in my way of seeing that engagement. So by taking someone's ideas and putting it into your own words (and still citing pages with paranthetical citations) you're demonstrating two things:

    1.) you are meaningfully engaging with the ideas
    2.) you are able to keep pace with the volume & speed of exchange and not get mired in details
    Yeah, I understand what you mean about the college students, and the logic behind the rule, I just like to complain about it.

    When I ask for this, I don't actually expect my students to carefully read every word of an article (and I tell them this directly). Instead, I expect them to be able to decode where the argument is being built within the article, and see where the important components are located. Much like I can take a bicycle and know where to set my eyes to see its key distinguishing features (If I'm interested in the cost of that bike, I would wonder, what kind of rear derailleur is it? you can usually price a bike by that one piece of knowledge; if I need to know if this is good for trail riding or commuting I might look at the frame geometry), I expect my students to learn to locate these key distinguishing features in a scholarly article.
    Every discipline has genre conventions and there are really only two parts to article analysis: 1.) learn where the moves are being made 2.) learn how terms function in the particular discourse community that you're trying to listen in on. Like, "theory" in science is not at all what theory means colloqually. Every discipline, sub-discipline, and research speciality argues about how to define terms. So I need to see you get a pulse on that conversation. How are those particular authors defining their terms?

    Don't get swamped in the details. Start looking for those two things in the paragraph prior to this one, and remember that the goals are probably the first two things I mentioned.
    Got it.

    Let me know if you have any questions.
    I just might take you up on that, and I might ask you about bikes too, because I’ve been thinking about getting a bike.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Thesaurus.
    I would like to know about your drama.

    Tell me about your drama.


    Quote Originally Posted by Glycerine View Post
    Read the abstract, introduction, hypothesis, and conclusion first to get a basic picture of they are trying to research. Then read the discussion and everything else.

    Try to convey what the author is saying in less words than they are using (most of the time, research articles are rather convoluted anyways).

    Only use the jargon if there isn't another word that captures the same nuance/concept.

    If you are resourceful enough, you don't need to use quotes at all. Learn the art of paraphrasing (and giving credit).

    This is from a psychology major.
    @bold - Yes, we know, Glycerine, we knowwwwwwwww… Give it a rest already. You finished your BA in psychology with a minor in Philosophy and you got a 3.7 in philosophy.

    Thanks for the advice.

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