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  1. #11
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Have you been issued your cane and/or walker yet? Get the walker with the tennis balls on the feet. It's sublime.

  2. #12
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Have you been issued your cane and/or walker yet? Get the walker with the tennis balls on the feet. It's sublime.
    The scooter's more fun, but the battery drain is a bitch and if Medicare doesn't pay, it's probably not worth the drain on my Disability insurance.

    I also like pretending I can't hear the young people speak. "Whatdju say, sonny? Speak up -- right after you fetch me my teeth!" Sometimes I wave my ear cone at them for good measure. So far they have not questioned me... I think.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  3. #13
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CleanCuteNFP View Post
    TLDR Summary: As I get older, I can no longer perform mental tasks in the same way as I used to and I do not feel any wiser.

    Post continued below:

    Wisdom comes with age is how the old adage goes, but I have come to realize that this might not be true as a whole.

    As I close in on my 26th anum of existence here on this turbulent organic sphere, I find that I am no longer as intelligent as I used to be. There are many facets to this and I can not do them all justice here. One of particular interest is the fact that I no longer possess the capability to compose coherent arguments like I used to back in college. Sure, many of you can argue the fact that I no longer have to perform this task on a regular basis has contributed to this rather apparent decline in cognitive faculties; yet I would counter argue, that we as a society judge intelligence based on the ability to perform in regards to certain mental accumens, and writing is one of them. Thus, the lack of practice, should not be heralded as an excuse, rather a direct sign of decline due to lack of interest. What do I mean by all of this? I guess, my greatest wish is to convey the fact that as I grow older, I do not feel much wiser, but I do feel like I have lost intelligence. Do any of you feel the same?
    I tested as 170ish IQ at age 20, and at most 140 at age 30. Once did a test of below 120 iq. I feel like someone with brain damage at times, but I shrug it off. I know that I'm a wise person and someone who's capable of doing their thing.

    Other things: I was Europe's #1 command and conquer player of all the 10,000 accounts for more than two months, now I'm barely at the top 1% of the warcraft III ladder - and that's my best game. I do feel the mental decline.

    On the other hand, I regularly meet university project teams who are ready to take up a new problem. They don't quite have the idea how projects work in the real world, and they have unrealistic assumptions. My input improves their results tremendously.

    Also, some young people at my university have wonderful projects, but somehow they haven't gathered the mathematical know-how to go through the more mathematically inclined projects, especially those that have something to do with research. I'm often amazed that the people look so good, yet they must be taught in mathematical / Computer science knowledge to get their projects done.

    All in all, the mental faculties of a smart person probably and usually shift from quick tasks to wise and slow tasks. It's possible to adjust to the changing situation.

  4. #14
    morose bourgeoisie
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    The mind becomes specialized with age. IQ is a measure of potential, not experience. It is seen with athletic skill too; as you train, you become better at that activity.
    Look at pro cyclisting: there are specialists in climbing, sprinting, time trial; all of those athletes probably are very close in terms of potential for most things, but training and morphology create pockets of specialization, which also created a relative weakness in the areas that are not focused on. This is true for activities of the mind as well.

  5. #15
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceBaby View Post
    26 is old now?
    After 24 neurogenesis slows considerably

    I feel you cleancutesfp (doubled your post count already I see)
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  6. #16
    your resident asshole
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    Have you heard of the concepts of fluid and crystallized intelligence?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
    Fluid intelligence, like reaction time, typically peaks in young adulthood and then steadily declines. This decline may be related to local atrophy of the brain in the right cerebellum.[23] Other researchers have suggested that a lack of practice, along with age-related changes in the brain may contribute to the decline.[4] Crystallized intelligence typically increases gradually, stays relatively stable across most of adulthood, and then begins to decline after age 65.[4] The exact peak age of cognitive skills remains elusive, it depends on the skill measurement as well as on the survey design. Cross-sectional data shows typically an earlier onset of cognitive decline in comparison with longitudinal data. The former may be confounded due to cohort effects while the latter may be biased due to prior test experiences.[24]

  7. #17
    Glycerine
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    Sounds like something is wrong or you are doing it wrong. I thought people typically peaked in their 20s- to early 30s and then just gradually declined after about 35.

  8. #18
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Do you use drugs? Do you get wasted regularly?

    You should be peaking in intellectual capacity by late 20s - 30s.

    There are ways to get yourself interested in whatever you'd want to improve... that's not age related in you case. Abilities get rusty if you don't practice them.

  9. #19
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    Once you start worrying about intelligence, you never stop. I suggest sudoku.

    Or an intense obession that never lets you rest. But then again this is easier for me, being as how ive never felt like a nimble minded person and never stopped feeling like a moron.
    'One of (Lucas) Cranach's masterpieces, discussed by (Joseph) Koerner, is in it's self-referentiality the perfect expression of left-hemisphere emptiness and a precursor of post-modernism. There is no longer anything to point to beyond, nothing Other, so it points pointlessly to itself.' - Iain McGilChrist

    Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
    "Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
    Piglet was comforted by this.
    - A.A. Milne.

  10. #20
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santtu View Post
    Other things: I was Europe's #1 command and conquer player of all the 10,000 accounts for more than two months, now I'm barely at the top 1% of the warcraft III ladder - and that's my best game. I do feel the mental decline.
    That's not mental; that's reflex. Or at least, all evidence points to it being reflex action that pro gamers lose as they get older.

    edit: Sometimes I wonder how I know this stuff and it sounds weird when I say it: a friend is doing his masters covering pro-gaming (granted from a sociological POV), which is where I discovered this little tidbit.

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