User Tag List

First 45678 Last

Results 51 to 60 of 118

  1. #51
    Retired Nicki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post
    I basically hopped on a cruise ship in Florida and went sailing around the world back to Florida. It was amazing. I haven't really talked about it in my blog beyond a very quick summary so I can't requote and it would take hundreds of thousands of words to convey it.

    Expensive, probably the lazy and safe way of travelling, but the nicest way I could of visited 40+ countries in only a few years. I also hit the major spots, which are tough to get to... like Easter Island.




    I don't have one.

    I've lived a varied life. Work wise, in my teens I worked for an in-house print shop in a large technology company, then the financial company thing, then I worked a long stretch doing project co-ordination and project management light. Tough to explain that position; I did database administration alongside document management and overall management of schedules budgets and stuff. To put it in context, they were large projects - total projects we watched over would well exceed a billion dollars. So that was cool, simply because of the scope.

    Right now I'm helping a friend who is taking over a family engineering business, doing much the same thing (although on a smaller scale). As a result, I end up doing just about everything; structural drawings, detailed design review, tons of the whole customer -> us -> subcontractor stuff, instrumentation (which is lots of logic diagrams, etc.) and I suppose a lot of the logistics (purchasing, shipping etc).

    I just do... couldn't care less what I'm doing. So my "career" is built around what I have done and what I'm good at. I'd rather be doing something new as well, so that plays a very big part of me moving around.

    As far as education -> career track, I don't use a thing I've learned. Right now I'm looking for a degree in financial engineering, but I've taken tech school (network engineering) to liberal arts (psychology). Course, I don't really finish those degrees, bwhahah.

    I really don't follow social norms in that regard. It's not the easiest or best choice to make... but it's what I can't help but do!



    I just did, I guess. I mean, all those things moved me forward, step by step. Things that were a hurdle, like dating with social anxiety, just faded away.





    Absolutely, and it's good thing to be curious
    That sounds pretty fun. What was your favorite place you visited? Ah, I see. What got you interested in that sort of thing? That's sounds really fascinating. Are those degrees boring to pursue? Oh okay, I see. I get what you mean. Yay, I'm glad you didn't find my questions annoying haha.

  2. #52
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aleda View Post
    How did you deal with high school? I hope to do so, I want to go to college in a big town or city, if I do go to college that is. That makes me happy. How's it like being an adult? I definitely hope so. I would do that but I don't know what I want to do in the future, like at all. I have a ton of planning notebooks but I don't know what to actually do. I never feel productive if I'm actually enjoying something and a feeling of accomplishment is important to me. Like what? I'm completely clueless about what I want to do.
    Allow me to try to get to all the questions.
    High school was hard on me. I was bullied a lot, I felt above my age (it turns out I was.. it's a bit presumptuous to think that as a teenager, but I was forced to grow up a bit faster than those around me and it made me isolated from my peers) and I didn't like the atmosphere of fake flowers and ribbons, football games, and band practice. I just didn't really like the high school atmosphere, so I isolated myself just as much as I was isolated by others. I got through it by choosing classes that were fun for me (I took aquatic science even though that was useless to me, and auto tech because it was two hours long and I could get away with doing little and sleeping) and hanging out with my best friend as much as possible. I mostly just made friends with the teachers so I could get good letters of recommendation and I focused on good grades since grades were the only semi-useful thing I could find in high school. Good grades will get you on the right path.
    When I was a teenager, I wanted to move out of my house SO BAD. I had no clue what to do for a career, no desire for college (you have one leg up on me on that one!), but I did want to be independent and on my own. So.. I did everything in my power to be treated like an adult. I wanted to be one so badly that I had to change people's take on me so that they saw an adult too. I started making sure my room was clean and tidy, did my own laundry, etc. I took chores upon myself (moreso than the necessary) because they were common areas that I shared. I went to work, and I saved and budgeted my money so that I could afford to buy and sustain my own car. I started to shop for smart craigslist-style deals (this was before craigslist though we used to have to really hunt for cool things like that) for things that would be useful in my own home when I got one and stashed them away in my closet. (I had a microwave 3 years before I had an apartment.. it seems useless, but it made me feel better to have it there. Turns out, all that stuff came in handy when I did get my own place.) I started to change my mentality.. I thought about the future instead of day-by-day. I changed my diet to a healthier one, exercised.... I just changed. I kept changing things around me and making decisions that reflected those my parents made. Eventually it did work.. Most of all: I never ever assumed myself to be an adult. I never thought anything that teenagers were supposed to do was beneath me.. so when my parents wanted me to have a bedtime and curfew.. I didn't get mad, I accepted it and tried to see it from their eyes. That probably worked more than anything else did. Things like that instill trust. And trust is something adults give to adults more readily than to kids. You win an adult's trust, you might as well be an adult.

    If you want to go to college, I say you've got a GREAT start right there. There is a LOT that goes into college.. scholarships to apply for, SATs to prep for so that you can go where ever you want straight out of college, part-time jobs you can do to save money for college, research to be done to find the best schools for you and your needs. Going to college debt-free would be an amazing thing that not a lot of young people accomplish.. so maybe you ought to start there. Just digest it one bite at a time. Write in those planners a day to study for SAT material for an hour. A day to find out what schools offer the widest range of majors in the towns and cities you like and what they're requirements are. Plan your high school career around what you want out of college. Try to apply for a part time job close enough to walk to in case you don't have a ride. Learn how to budget money well and how to save it. There's a ton of small, working pieces that are manageable and valuable that teenagers can get their hands on. And you have the invaluable Internet to help you every step of the way.

    Colleges all require basic courses to be taken for a couple years before you even start on a major... so you'll have all of high school and two years of college and growing up and being an adult to figure out what sort of major you want to take.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  3. #53
    Retired Nicki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    Allow me to try to get to all the questions.
    High school was hard on me. I was bullied a lot, I felt above my age (it turns out I was.. it's a bit presumptuous to think that as a teenager, but I was forced to grow up a bit faster than those around me and it made me isolated from my peers) and I didn't like the atmosphere of fake flowers and ribbons, football games, and band practice. I just didn't really like the high school atmosphere, so I isolated myself just as much as I was isolated by others. I got through it by choosing classes that were fun for me (I took aquatic science even though that was useless to me, and auto tech because it was two hours long and I could get away with doing little and sleeping) and hanging out with my best friend as much as possible. I mostly just made friends with the teachers so I could get good letters of recommendation and I focused on good grades since grades were the only semi-useful thing I could find in high school. Good grades will get you on the right path.
    When I was a teenager, I wanted to move out of my house SO BAD. I had no clue what to do for a career, no desire for college (you have one leg up on me on that one!), but I did want to be independent and on my own. So.. I did everything in my power to be treated like an adult. I wanted to be one so badly that I had to change people's take on me so that they saw an adult too. I started making sure my room was clean and tidy, did my own laundry, etc. I took chores upon myself (moreso than the necessary) because they were common areas that I shared. I went to work, and I saved and budgeted my money so that I could afford to buy and sustain my own car. I started to shop for smart craigslist-style deals (this was before craigslist though we used to have to really hunt for cool things like that) for things that would be useful in my own home when I got one and stashed them away in my closet. (I had a microwave 3 years before I had an apartment.. it seems useless, but it made me feel better to have it there. Turns out, all that stuff came in handy when I did get my own place.) I started to change my mentality.. I thought about the future instead of day-by-day. I changed my diet to a healthier one, exercised.... I just changed. I kept changing things around me and making decisions that reflected those my parents made. Eventually it did work.. Most of all: I never ever assumed myself to be an adult. I never thought anything that teenagers were supposed to do was beneath me.. so when my parents wanted me to have a bedtime and curfew.. I didn't get mad, I accepted it and tried to see it from their eyes. That probably worked more than anything else did. Things like that instill trust. And trust is something adults give to adults more readily than to kids. You win an adult's trust, you might as well be an adult.

    If you want to go to college, I say you've got a GREAT start right there. There is a LOT that goes into college.. scholarships to apply for, SATs to prep for so that you can go where ever you want straight out of college, part-time jobs you can do to save money for college, research to be done to find the best schools for you and your needs. Going to college debt-free would be an amazing thing that not a lot of young people accomplish.. so maybe you ought to start there. Just digest it one bite at a time. Write in those planners a day to study for SAT material for an hour. A day to find out what schools offer the widest range of majors in the towns and cities you like and what they're requirements are. Plan your high school career around what you want out of college. Try to apply for a part time job close enough to walk to in case you don't have a ride. Learn how to budget money well and how to save it. There's a ton of small, working pieces that are manageable and valuable that teenagers can get their hands on. And you have the invaluable Internet to help you every step of the way.

    Colleges all require basic courses to be taken for a couple years before you even start on a major... so you'll have all of high school and two years of college and growing up and being an adult to figure out what sort of major you want to take.
    Ah, I see, that makes sense. I feel you. I think I'd function much better living on my own. I'd be less distracted because of other people. I really should do that, buy things in advance to prepare for moving out when I'm older. That makes sense. If all adults were rational...

    I don't even know anymore. While I am prepping for the SATs and PSATs right now just in case, I'm rather "poor," and I don't really want to take student loans. I don't want to begin my life with debt. I really want a job or two though, it would be nice to have a productive way of spending my time. Too bad I'm 14 and I'm not allowed to get a job until I'm 16 in my state. I don't exactly know what I want out of college though. I know what I want to achieve in life overall but I'm not sure career-wise. I don't want to just have a regular career, I want to aim higher and work harder. How did you figure out what you wanted to do in life, regarding your career, etc.?

  4. #54
    Retired Nicki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    Allow me to try to get to all the questions.
    High school was hard on me. I was bullied a lot, I felt above my age (it turns out I was.. it's a bit presumptuous to think that as a teenager, but I was forced to grow up a bit faster than those around me and it made me isolated from my peers) and I didn't like the atmosphere of fake flowers and ribbons, football games, and band practice. I just didn't really like the high school atmosphere, so I isolated myself just as much as I was isolated by others. I got through it by choosing classes that were fun for me (I took aquatic science even though that was useless to me, and auto tech because it was two hours long and I could get away with doing little and sleeping) and hanging out with my best friend as much as possible. I mostly just made friends with the teachers so I could get good letters of recommendation and I focused on good grades since grades were the only semi-useful thing I could find in high school. Good grades will get you on the right path.
    When I was a teenager, I wanted to move out of my house SO BAD. I had no clue what to do for a career, no desire for college (you have one leg up on me on that one!), but I did want to be independent and on my own. So.. I did everything in my power to be treated like an adult. I wanted to be one so badly that I had to change people's take on me so that they saw an adult too. I started making sure my room was clean and tidy, did my own laundry, etc. I took chores upon myself (moreso than the necessary) because they were common areas that I shared. I went to work, and I saved and budgeted my money so that I could afford to buy and sustain my own car. I started to shop for smart craigslist-style deals (this was before craigslist though we used to have to really hunt for cool things like that) for things that would be useful in my own home when I got one and stashed them away in my closet. (I had a microwave 3 years before I had an apartment.. it seems useless, but it made me feel better to have it there. Turns out, all that stuff came in handy when I did get my own place.) I started to change my mentality.. I thought about the future instead of day-by-day. I changed my diet to a healthier one, exercised.... I just changed. I kept changing things around me and making decisions that reflected those my parents made. Eventually it did work.. Most of all: I never ever assumed myself to be an adult. I never thought anything that teenagers were supposed to do was beneath me.. so when my parents wanted me to have a bedtime and curfew.. I didn't get mad, I accepted it and tried to see it from their eyes. That probably worked more than anything else did. Things like that instill trust. And trust is something adults give to adults more readily than to kids. You win an adult's trust, you might as well be an adult.

    If you want to go to college, I say you've got a GREAT start right there. There is a LOT that goes into college.. scholarships to apply for, SATs to prep for so that you can go where ever you want straight out of college, part-time jobs you can do to save money for college, research to be done to find the best schools for you and your needs. Going to college debt-free would be an amazing thing that not a lot of young people accomplish.. so maybe you ought to start there. Just digest it one bite at a time. Write in those planners a day to study for SAT material for an hour. A day to find out what schools offer the widest range of majors in the towns and cities you like and what they're requirements are. Plan your high school career around what you want out of college. Try to apply for a part time job close enough to walk to in case you don't have a ride. Learn how to budget money well and how to save it. There's a ton of small, working pieces that are manageable and valuable that teenagers can get their hands on. And you have the invaluable Internet to help you every step of the way.

    Colleges all require basic courses to be taken for a couple years before you even start on a major... so you'll have all of high school and two years of college and growing up and being an adult to figure out what sort of major you want to take.
    Ah, I see, that makes sense. I feel you. I think I'd function much better living on my own. I'd be less distracted because of other people. I really should do that, buy things in advance to prepare for moving out when I'm older. That makes sense. If all adults were rational...

    I don't even know anymore. While I am prepping for the SATs and PSATs right now just in case, I'm rather "poor," and I don't really want to take student loans. I don't want to begin my life with debt. I really want a job or two though, it would be nice to have a productive way of spending my time. Too bad I'm 14 and I'm not allowed to get a job until I'm 16 in my state. I don't exactly know what I want out of college though. I know what I want to achieve in life overall but I'm not sure career-wise. I don't want to just have a regular career, I want to aim higher and work harder. How did you figure out what you wanted to do in life, regarding your career, etc.?

  5. #55
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Posts
    4,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aleda View Post
    That sounds pretty fun. What was your favorite place you visited?
    I'll drop my answer from here: http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...=1#post1979393 in

    The trip was epic in many ways but there is simply too much to talk about to just go into it. Common questions answered in order of popularity: Petra and Ephesus are the best ancient wonders I saw. Easter Island was the most significant to me. Bora Bora is the most beautiful place in the world. The people of Tonga are the nicest and most genuine. Yes, I got sea sick and yes the atlantic is a horrible horrible place, especially when the storms are following you the entire way.


    Ah, I see. What got you interested in that sort of thing?
    Interested?

    Are those degrees boring to pursue?
    I have a talent for absorbing information, and I like dealing with information. So, not boring, but not fun either. It's satisfying, so long as I do it because I want to.

  6. #56
    Retired Nicki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post
    I'll drop my answer from here: http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...=1#post1979393 in

    The trip was epic in many ways but there is simply too much to talk about to just go into it. Common questions answered in order of popularity: Petra and Ephesus are the best ancient wonders I saw. Easter Island was the most significant to me. Bora Bora is the most beautiful place in the world. The people of Tonga are the nicest and most genuine. Yes, I got sea sick and yes the atlantic is a horrible horrible place, especially when the storms are following you the entire way.




    Interested?



    I have a talent for absorbing information, and I like dealing with information. So, not boring, but not fun either. It's satisfying, so long as I do it because I want to.
    That's really, really fascinating. I'll definitely read your post. Ah okay, I see.

  7. #57
    Retired Nicki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post
    I'll drop my answer from here: http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...=1#post1979393 in

    The trip was epic in many ways but there is simply too much to talk about to just go into it. Common questions answered in order of popularity: Petra and Ephesus are the best ancient wonders I saw. Easter Island was the most significant to me. Bora Bora is the most beautiful place in the world. The people of Tonga are the nicest and most genuine. Yes, I got sea sick and yes the atlantic is a horrible horrible place, especially when the storms are following you the entire way.




    Interested?



    I have a talent for absorbing information, and I like dealing with information. So, not boring, but not fun either. It's satisfying, so long as I do it because I want to.
    That's really, really fascinating. I'll definitely read your post. Ah okay, I see.

  8. #58
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aleda View Post
    Ah, I see, that makes sense. I feel you. I think I'd function much better living on my own. I'd be less distracted because of other people. I really should do that, buy things in advance to prepare for moving out when I'm older. That makes sense. If all adults were rational...

    I don't even know anymore. While I am prepping for the SATs and PSATs right now just in case, I'm rather "poor," and I don't really want to take student loans. I don't want to begin my life with debt. I really want a job or two though, it would be nice to have a productive way of spending my time. Too bad I'm 14 and I'm not allowed to get a job until I'm 16 in my state. I don't exactly know what I want out of college though. I know what I want to achieve in life overall but I'm not sure career-wise. I don't want to just have a regular career, I want to aim higher and work harder. How did you figure out what you wanted to do in life, regarding your career, etc.?
    I went to school without debt, it's definitely possible for poor people. What might not be possible is going to school and not working. Which is fine for the first couple years, harder for the second couple but you may be used to the routine by then. I say, work at 16 and see if you make it through high school with the same job and without grades slipping. (Until then, developing work ethics like cleaning constantly, not quitting or giving up on a task, etc. will help a ton.) If you do, you'll be set up for success. I worked only on the weekends.. it meant no truly 'free' day unless it was a school holiday during the week.. but that turned out to be good for me in the end.

    I don't know about your state, but in Texas, our Pell grants are decent. Around $1000 extra left to the college student for the semester. Divided by 6 months that's a little more than $150 a week to live off of.. parents house, a small cell phone bill, some gas money on a beat up car, a meal out with friends, and the occasional "oh shit, this happened" will survive off of that if you live like you're in high school and as a teenager even though you're an adult. There's plenty of resources for living frugal, free events for college students, and things to occupy your time as an adult without it costing you a dime. With a weekend job, some smart budgeting, and a pell grant, community college can be easily afforded. Live with the 'rents even if you don't want to, attend community college using only pell grant money and any scholarships you apply for, and work on the weekends and never touch that money... because.. if you budget your work money smart to save enough money over the course of 4 years (two in high school, two in college) to pay for the other two years of university you'll have an awesome time debt-free without too much stress. If you plan it out smart enough (i.e. do some research on the real costs of living and being in college on your own and setting the bar for that amount to be saved), you can pay for the meal plans, dormitories, and everything well ahead of time and never have to stress or work while having real college experience for the other two years.

    Two years of.. well. crappy work with no time off. (You hate high school anyways, right? What's a simple job that's going to help out two days a week really going to hurt?)
    Two years of 2-3 days off a week and frugal, modest living while saving money.
    and Two years of well budgeted, but still fun, work-less ability to focus just on studies and enjoying life a bit more.

    Then, what? You're 22, have a bachelor's degree in something, and you're debt free. Not too shabby, even if you don't know what you want to do with your life by then.


    So far as what I did.. I joined the army. I wish I would have followed ^ that plan when I was a kid.. but since I didn't, the army was my only debt-free option. I took it. I like my job, but it definitely has its drawbacks. I still don't know what I want to do as a civilian.. the army has a way of delaying that decision for you. My plan right now is to finish school and see where a degree in biochemistry takes me.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  9. #59
    WALMART
    Guest

    Default

    It sounds like you were injected with a bit of awesome at birth, giving you supernatural abilities of mature observation from a young age.


    People are special snow flakes with strange ideologies that run the entire gamut of the spectrum. Being a teenager is indeed a little weird, but it gets better in time. I suspect growing to accept people as they are will help with your frustrations. Control starts with you, blah blah blah.

  10. #60
    Retired Nicki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    I went to school without debt, it's definitely possible for poor people. What might not be possible is going to school and not working. Which is fine for the first couple years, harder for the second couple but you may be used to the routine by then. I say, work at 16 and see if you make it through high school with the same job and without grades slipping. (Until then, developing work ethics like cleaning constantly, not quitting or giving up on a task, etc. will help a ton.) If you do, you'll be set up for success. I worked only on the weekends.. it meant no truly 'free' day unless it was a school holiday during the week.. but that turned out to be good for me in the end.

    I don't know about your state, but in Texas, our Pell grants are decent. Around $1000 extra left to the college student for the semester. Divided by 6 months that's a little more than $150 a week to live off of.. parents house, a small cell phone bill, some gas money on a beat up car, a meal out with friends, and the occasional "oh shit, this happened" will survive off of that if you live like you're in high school and as a teenager even though you're an adult. There's plenty of resources for living frugal, free events for college students, and things to occupy your time as an adult without it costing you a dime. With a weekend job, some smart budgeting, and a pell grant, community college can be easily afforded. Live with the 'rents even if you don't want to, attend community college using only pell grant money and any scholarships you apply for, and work on the weekends and never touch that money... because.. if you budget your work money smart to save enough money over the course of 4 years (two in high school, two in college) to pay for the other two years of university you'll have an awesome time debt-free without too much stress. If you plan it out smart enough (i.e. do some research on the real costs of living and being in college on your own and setting the bar for that amount to be saved), you can pay for the meal plans, dormitories, and everything well ahead of time and never have to stress or work while having real college experience for the other two years.

    Two years of.. well. crappy work with no time off. (You hate high school anyways, right? What's a simple job that's going to help out two days a week really going to hurt?)
    Two years of 2-3 days off a week and frugal, modest living while saving money.
    and Two years of well budgeted, but still fun, work-less ability to focus just on studies and enjoying life a bit more.

    Then, what? You're 22, have a bachelor's degree in something, and you're debt free. Not too shabby, even if you don't know what you want to do with your life by then.


    So far as what I did.. I joined the army. I wish I would have followed ^ that plan when I was a kid.. but since I didn't, the army was my only debt-free option. I took it. I like my job, but it definitely has its drawbacks. I still don't know what I want to do as a civilian.. the army has a way of delaying that decision for you. My plan right now is to finish school and see where a degree in biochemistry takes me.
    Woah you have no idea how helpful this is. Thanks a lot! Does it sound reasonable to work after school or would I be biting off more than I can chew? I really want to rent an apartment as soon as I turn 18 but I'm not sure. The cheapest, nicest apartments around where I live cost around 400$-700$ per month. I'll try to research more on scholarships. What are the pros about getting a degree besides more job opportunities? How was the army like? Good luck!

Similar Threads

  1. Are any other men on this site afraid of kids?
    By The Great One in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 05-03-2014, 01:45 PM
  2. [E5] Do any other 5s do this?
    By acronach in forum Enneatypes
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 07-29-2012, 03:25 AM
  3. [INTP] Does anyone feel this way? how do you cope with it?
    By think2much in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-19-2010, 04:37 AM
  4. [SP] Any other SPs like this game lol
    By Rainne in forum The SP Arthouse (ESFP, ISFP, ESTP, ISTP)
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-06-2010, 09:04 PM
  5. Can Someone Help Me Understand Why The President of Mexico Feels This Way?
    By Thalassa in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 99
    Last Post: 06-01-2010, 09:14 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO