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  • I play tabletop rpg(s)

    6 31.58%
  • I used to play tabletop rpg(s) regularly

    4 21.05%
  • I've tried tabletop rpg(s)

    7 36.84%
  • I've never tried tabletop rpg(s)

    2 10.53%
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  1. #1
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Default Tabletop role-playing games (pen and paper rpgs)

    I've been watching a Brazilian match making program.

    On the last episode, a woman that plays rpg games chose to go out on a date with a guy that also plays rpg games and went there just to meet her.

    On the current episode, the woman said everything was going really well, but when she found out that they belonged to antagonist sects on the rpg they both play, they both gave up (the guy confirmed her version).

    I've done some research, and, based on the sects that the woman mentioned,the name of the game is Vampire: The Masquerade

    That has got me interested in the subject.
    These questions are directed to people who play tabletop rpgs:

    -Is that supposed to be a ''normal'' rpg player behavior (i.e. letting the role you play in a game affect real life)?
    -What makes this variety of rpg more interesting than mmorpgs or console rpgs?
    -Aren't things too arbitrary? I believe the Game Master usually has too much power over the developments.

    Thanks.

    Last edited by Rasofy; 08-06-2012 at 04:49 AM. Reason: .

  2. #2
    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    It was hard to figure out what you're actually asking, since it isn't very plain, but none the less...

    Quote Originally Posted by Rasofy View Post
    -Is that supposed to be a ''normal'' rpg player behavior?
    Um, no.

    -What makes this variety of rpg more interesting than mmorpgs or console rpgs?
    Fairly unlimited detail and interaction. Computer games are limited by programming, so if for example you need to open a locked door, you might only be allowed to use a key or a lock pick because there's only so many things you can program. In table top you can use something improvised and reason out if it will be effective or not without the developers explicitly saying what is possible.

    Video games that try to get around this by making destructable environments, like Red Faction, or Minecraft, usually end up having to make it so where you can't do what you want everywhere because it will just break the game. Even in Minecraft you can build complex machines just arbitrarily and harvest monsters automatically without actually fighting them.

    -Aren't things too arbitrary? I believe the Game Master usually has too much power over the developments.
    Yes they are arbitrary to some extent. There's many a tale about bad GM's. There's also many a tale about ridiculous players, too.

  3. #3
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprinkles View Post
    It was hard to figure out what you're actually asking, since it isn't very plain, but none the less...


    Um, no.
    Good.

    Thank you for the answers, they make a lot of sense.

  4. #4
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    I don't play them, but my understanding is Vampire is pretty unique, for being a live action --- and persistent live action - type of RPG. You embody your own character.. It's more about taking on a pseudo identity and engaging in "theater" than it is playing a game. It's not "Table Top", in the D&D sense. That's why it's called "Masquerade". If someone was serious about it, I guess someone from a different "Sect" would definitely get in the way (there are basically nobility caste vamps in this world, as well as feral ones, common ones.. among other things.. they have all kinds of societal rules and politics...lol). They play this game out in the real world. They wouldn't be able to actual roleplay.

  5. #5
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    I don't play them, but my understanding is Vampire is pretty unique, for being a live action --- and persistent live action - type of RPG. You embody your own character.. It's more about taking on a pseudo identity and engaging in "theater" than it is playing a game. It's not "Table Top", in the D&D sense. That's why it's called "Masquerade". If someone was serious about it, I guess someone from a different "Sect" would definitely get in the way (there are basically nobility caste vamps in this world, as well as feral ones, common ones.. among other things.. they have all kinds of societal rules and politics...lol). They play this game out in the real world. They wouldn't be able to actual roleplay.
    Sick. It's like a religion, but without purpose.

  6. #6
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasofy View Post
    Sick. It's like a religion, but without purpose.
    I don't know about lack of purpose. I think some get laid.

    It is like a religion though. I met this girl who had some books. They have a mythology based on "Cain" from the bible.. basically the mark of Cain is the mark of vampires. So they have this whole parallel history alongside humans. But I think the players take it as a metaphor and apply it realistically. Cain was an outcast. And so are they.

  7. #7
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasofy View Post
    I've been watching a Brazilian match making program.

    On the last episode, a woman that plays rpg games chose to go out on a date with a guy that also plays rpg games and went there just to meet her.

    On the current episode, the woman said everything was going really well, but when she found out that they belonged to antagonist sects on the rpg they both play, they both gave up (the guy confirmed her version).

    I've done some research, and, based on the sects that the woman mentioned,the name of the game is Vampire: The Masquerade

    That has got me interested in the subject.
    These questions are directed to people who play tabletop rpgs:

    -Is that supposed to be a ''normal'' rpg player behavior (i.e. letting the role you play in a game affect real life)?
    White Wolf games are a little different from games like AD&D. There's more of an emphasis on storytelling per se rather than mechanics, and it lends itself better to variations like LARPing (live-action role-playing). I've had friends who have gone to Vampire parties, and they're more like "Mystery Parties" -- you know, where people get assigned roles and have to solve a mystery throughout the course of the night, acting out their parts.

    It's certainly not required for players to change their real life attachments and behavior as part of playing Vampire or any other game. Personally I think it's stupid and potentially harmful to let a game dictate what your real-life attachments are, although if they are letting the game control their lives, the faction rivalry (sects) are pretty intense within Vampire.


    -What makes this variety of rpg more interesting than mmorpgs or console rpgs?
    MMOs and console RPGs wouldn't even exist without tabletop; that variation came first, and so eventually computer programs were developed to hit the demographic, until those industries took off.

    As others have said, tabletop offers much more diversity of play (because humans are creating the game as they go in real time, and can adjust/change/add to the mechanics of the game or accommodate things not within the mechanics) and are more social/relational oriented. I mean, you're hanging out with people in real-time, talking to them directly, interacting with them directly, in your body. it's like a party -- you laugh, mourn, joke around, build off the energy in the room, and eat lots of snacks.

    -Aren't things too arbitrary? I believe the Game Master usually has too much power over the developments.
    Too arbitrary? You can play a computer game and be totally locked into whatever the game developers decided; games are far more rigid and the developers have total control over what you do in a computer game. With a GM in the room, there is far more opportunity to work together to create a story together. The possibilities are far more fulfilling. Of course, you need a decent Game Master; still, it's self-selecting, since Game Masters that make unhappy players soon no longer have anyone playing their game.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  8. #8
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I've had friends who have gone to Vampire parties, and they're more like "Mystery Parties" -- you know, where people get assigned roles and have to solve a mystery throughout the course of the night, acting out their parts.
    That sounds cool actually.. I would like to do one of those (be it RPG or one of those murder mysteries). I saw some documentary on some of these though, where it was a lot more persistent and pretentious than that. They didn't really drop the masks.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Eckhart's Avatar
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    Never tried. I never knew anyone (besides some internet friends) who plays tabletop. If I had friends who do it I would probably try it out, because I like games.

  10. #10
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eckhart View Post
    Never tried. I never knew anyone (besides some internet friends) who plays tabletop. If I had friends who do it I would probably try it out, because I like games.
    Regular table top games is rolling dice and bullshitting over some beers. Except your game pieces are dirty British guys and dwarves and you've given them some background and personality. I've only ever really played warhammer, but the GM gave it a kind of Monty Pyton-esque atmosphere (or maybe Warhammer is already like that).

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