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View Poll Results: Should violent sex offenders have to take lie detector tests after prison release

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13. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes Indeedy

    3 23.08%
  • No, it's a no.

    3 23.08%
  • I'm in the grey shaded area sitting on the fence

    3 23.08%
  • Other... I will explain

    4 30.77%
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  1. #1
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
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    Default Lie detector tests for sex offenders post prison release - harm or safety?

    Controversial thread time.


    I heard this on the radio news today and immediately thought it might be the way to go. Then i thought minority report. Thought crime. Big brother... etc

    Then i wondered how far we could possibly take this... could, if considered successful, it be extended to all people who have served at her majesty's pleasure.

    I'm also curious as to what will happen to those who fail the detector test, will they just be followed round the whole time electrodes hanging off their arm..."you want to rape and murder that woman?"
    How will it actually work (in theory, haha).
    Also it is possible to manipulate this system to give false results? I know some people can 'fool' lie dectector tests and some seem to make their red buzzer alarms go off just by blinking.

    The article linked talks of trials/pilots, i may look those up.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/20...detector-tests

    Thoughts? Idea's? Comments?
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

  2. #2
    WALMART
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    The article is poorly written =X


    But yeah, tough call. I don't care for it much. As you said, too much room for potential false-positives, fakes, yadda yadda.

    But what's that to the safety of a community..... hm.

  3. #3
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
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    Shhesh, and i was under the impression everyone liked voting!

    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

  4. #4
    WALMART
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    LOL.

    Maybe it will rise from the dead...

  5. #5
    ... Tyrinth's Avatar
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    I voted no, simply because if polygraphs aren't admissible in court, I don't see why they should be used here.

  6. #6
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Yes. As for the why, I think they should have been sentenced to death, so a small test is harmless in comparison, especially if it is able to give hints that could prevent future occurrences.

  7. #7
    WALMART
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasofy View Post
    Yes. As for the why, I think they should have been sentenced to death, so a small test is harmless in comparison, especially if it is able to give hints that could prevent future occurrences.

    think of all the innocence you would kill D=

  8. #8
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jontherobot View Post
    think of all the innocence you would kill D=
    My logic only works when the evidence is good. Some judges aren't strict enough, unfortunately.

  9. #9
    Senior Member EntangledLight's Avatar
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    i'm not against making sure they don't go on to commit the same crimes again, or even impinging on their "given" rights, but i would just want to do it in a way that would be a little more accurate (in other words, i can very easily see this causing adverse actions in the tester--making them into something unseemly while not even completing what they were set out to do in the first place, which was to monitor people who shouldn't have the luxury of being monitored in that way). to be honest, i like seeing things like this more than i do hearing bleeding-heart-idiots speak about how troubled their past must have been (let's forget how they are creating a troubled past for others and possibly breeding more people like them), or about how rehabilitation is the most humane thing to do (like they've somehow earned that sort of treatment?).

    i almost want to say that the punishments should be harsher, but then again, we could all easily end up harshly punishing innocent people, so... a broken system is the best thing we have at the moment... or maybe we could just ship them off to a deserted island far away from all people and guards/easily available food source/medical attention...

  10. #10
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    The lie detector does have control questions to test whether the machine is working. I would say as long as those questions are giving reliable results, then unless something happens unexpectedly soon after it should be fine.

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