User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Time management

  1. #1
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,685

    Default Time management

    Didnt know were to post this really so here seemed as good as any until I find out otherwise.

    At the minute I really dont have enough hours in the day and time seems to pass in a total blink of an eye, I dont know what to do to make better use of my time and I thought I'd ask for suggestions.

    I've used the apportioning of time to specific things and structuring my day really strictly with set times for breaks, lunch and keeping an eye on the time to make sure that I'm not taking too long for these things. That helped to a certain extent and I think I actually got more done than if I'd taken my coffee at my desk or eaten my lunch while working, which I still have to do sometimes.

    I've also spent less time with colleagues from the neighbouring office talking too, that has provided more time but I find that I'll need to have the radio on or listen to a podcast so stop from going mad. These things are distracting but only mildly so, I can write, redraft or type replies to e-mails but I cant read with either of them in the background.

    I've planned my days in terms of journeys so that I can do a couple in a day or do visits and still have meetings or other tasks in the same day. Although I did three different meetings in a row going from one to the other one day and that wasnt good, I'd not repeat that given a choice to be honest.

    This probably gives the impression that this is just a work thing, it isnt, I remember obsessing about it a while back and talking about limiting/restricting my time online, time spent watching TV (which unfortunately I've found is a family time thing in our house now, so restricting that means I wind up spending less time with parents) or watching DVDs, visiting the cinema and that didnt really work out. I just hate if I sit down to write my journal for the day and realise I cant really write anything.

    Someone told me to start going to sleep real early, unless I'm spending time with friends and get up and go running or to the gym around six in the morning and start the day that way. They swear by the idea and say that they get double the work done or things accomplished before twelve mid day that way than they would getting up at around nine and attribute it to day light and biology and stuff. What does anyone think, is that just hokum? What's your experience?

    I try not to obsess about this and really I'm nothing like I once was, although I do get from different quarters, work, social, senior and subordinate, feedback that I should just put the brakes on and spend less time actively doing stuff. I can bare that and even deliver that but all it'll take is someone cracking wise or jibbing that I'm lazy or have an easy time working/am lazy and it sets me off like firecracker.

    (I have intentionally tried to write this using language like an older person)

  2. #2

    Default

    Oh geez! Reading this stressed me out.

    Just don't put so many expectations on yourself for each day. Have a list of stuff you'd ideally like to accomplish (with the most important/pressing stuff coming first, of course) and then go with the flow from there. Don't get too upset if you can't finish your list...sometimes (more often than not) you're gonna have to make sacrifices. It's not really a big deal in the grande scheme of things.

    And regarding the TV thing, my roommates love to watch TV, but I have a million and one books I want to read. I want my cake (quality time with my friends) and eat it, too (quality time with my books). When we hang out in the living room at night, they watch their shows while I read and we still end up having an awesome time together even though we're doing two different things. You could try something similar with your parents.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ceecee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    8w9
    Posts
    9,747

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post

    I've used the apportioning of time to specific things and structuring my day really strictly with set times for breaks, lunch and keeping an eye on the time to make sure that I'm not taking too long for these things. That helped to a certain extent and I think I actually got more done than if I'd taken my coffee at my desk or eaten my lunch while working, which I still have to do sometimes.
    I think this is necessary to be productive. I work from home but I always take an actual lunch break, as in I leave my work and my computer and go in the kitchen or outside to eat and not look at any work. I also take a short nap, 30 minutes or so some days. I realize not everyone can do this but it works for me.

    This probably gives the impression that this is just a work thing, it isnt, I remember obsessing about it a while back and talking about limiting/restricting my time online, time spent watching TV (which unfortunately I've found is a family time thing in our house now, so restricting that means I wind up spending less time with parents) or watching DVDs, visiting the cinema and that didnt really work out. I just hate if I sit down to write my journal for the day and realise I cant really write anything.
    I don't really have an option to do this or not do this because we have children who have homework, after school sports and other activities and we want to spend time with them in the evenings. Everyone needs time every day for decompression/relaxing/winding down, be it with people or not. I don't think restricting time is a good idea, unless it is interfering in a negative way.

    Someone told me to start going to sleep real early, unless I'm spending time with friends and get up and go running or to the gym around six in the morning and start the day that way. They swear by the idea and say that they get double the work done or things accomplished before twelve mid day that way than they would getting up at around nine and attribute it to day light and biology and stuff. What does anyone think, is that just hokum? What's your experience?
    I don't think it's a crazy idea but it depends on the person. I am up by 5 am every day and I start work about 5:30. The reason I do this is because I prefer my work day done no later than 3pm. I'm not working an actual 10 hr day but some times there is work information that I don't receive until afternoon.


    I try not to obsess about this and really I'm nothing like I once was, although I do get from different quarters, work, social, senior and subordinate, feedback that I should just put the brakes on and spend less time actively doing stuff. I can bare that and even deliver that but all it'll take is someone cracking wise or jibbing that I'm lazy or have an easy time working/am lazy and it sets me off like firecracker.
    I hear people say it's so nice to be able to work from home and because I do, I must have time to do a car pool, pick up other peoples kids, babysit and the like. I don't get mad about it but I say no frequently. I got into this career and got a degree in it because I wanted a flexible kind of workday. I have no desire to be in a cube or office although I do have meetings every Friday at my office, they are over within a couple hours.

    (I have intentionally tried to write this using language like an older person)
    Why?
    I like to rock n' roll all night and *part* of every day. I usually have errands... I can only rock from like 1-3.

  4. #4
    RDF
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Didnt know were to post this really so here seemed as good as any until I find out otherwise.

    At the minute I really dont have enough hours in the day and time seems to pass in a total blink of an eye, I dont know what to do to make better use of my time and I thought I'd ask for suggestions. [...]
    There are lots of good books (self-help and business-related) available on the subject. I’ve only read a couple; the best so far is The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey.

    Obviously I can’t summarize it all. But I think the biggest principle that comes out of that book is that instead of trying to fit more activities into the day, you should prioritize and figure out what is really important. Keep the important stuff and chuck the rest.

    For example, when it comes to what’s important in your life as a whole, draw up a “personal mission statement” listing the things you really want to accomplish in life, and then look at your schedule and see if you are really working toward those things. Typically most people aren’t.

    IOW, prioritize what’s really important in your life, and then make sure your schedule genuinely reflects those priorities.

    As for work- or business-related stuff, the author breaks things down even further, into 4 so-called quandrants:

    --Quadrant I = urgent & important activities. These require a reactive posture, and people who spend a lot of time here are crisis managers & deadline-driven producers. They result in high burnout rates.
    --Quadrant II = not urgent but important activities. This is actually the proper place to be. Attention here will shrink Quadrant I by foreseeing areas of importance before they turn urgent.
    --Quadrant III = urgent but not important activities. These contribute to a sense of rushing around and being at the center of things, but they aren’t actually important.
    --Quadrant IV = not urgent and not important activities. These outright fritter time away.

    Quadrant II deals with things like building relationships, writing a personal mission statement, long-range planning, exercising, preventive maintenance, preparation--all the things we know that we need to do but never get around to because they aren’t urgent.

    The idea is to be focused on opportunities (Quadrant II) rather than problems (Quadrant I). Quadrant II is important (but not urgent) high-leverage capacity-building activities.

    The author gives the example of owners of a mall running around on business but not getting around to the important Quadrant II relationship-building activities of working with the shop owners who lease space. Allocating more time there led to better business for all and more profits.

    Proactivity (preventive activities) in Quadrant II result in something called the Pareto Principle: 80 percent of the results flow out of 20 percent of the activities.

    The author spends time detailing how to say “no” to activities in the other quadrants, and/or delegate such activities to others. Sometimes it’s guilt that keeps us in the other quadrants, sometimes popularity (Quad III), sometimes escapism (Quad IV). But if Quadrant II flows out of one’s principles and a personal mission, then you should see it as a natural, exciting place to invest your time.

    Anyway, those are just some examples of time-management principles from that book. The first part on personal mission statements comes from Habit 2; the second part on Quandrants comes from Habit 3.

    I heartily recommend reading the entire book; lots of great stuff there.

  5. #5
    WALMART
    Guest

    Default

    I always try to think of solutions to things like this,

    then I just do


    or sometimes, don't
    Last edited by WALMART; 07-18-2012 at 09:22 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    MBTI
    estj
    Enneagram
    378 sx/so
    Socionics
    esfp
    Posts
    3,036

    Default

    I am shit at this, but getting better. I find setting goals, giving myself a timeframe for their completion, and giving myself a timeframe for milestones helps. Also, I believe you have to give yourself small but significant rewards for each task.
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

Similar Threads

  1. Time management
    By rivercrow in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 06-20-2010, 05:32 AM
  2. Idiots Guide to Forum Time Management
    By wolfy in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-21-2009, 12:15 AM
  3. [ISTJ] ISTJ and Time Management Systems
    By Ozz in forum The SJ Guardhouse (ESFJ, ISFJ, ESTJ, ISTJ)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-31-2009, 05:08 AM
  4. Time Management for Anarchists
    By wolfy in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-08-2008, 10:00 PM
  5. Memorization and Time Managment are Stressful
    By JustDave in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-09-2008, 09:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO