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  1. #251
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICUP View Post
    You seem to be assuming that his statements mean something he has never explained they mean.
    Yes, some of us in non-Ti land are good at inferring accurate assumptions.

  2. #252
    Senior Member ICUP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    Yes, some of us in non-Ti land are good at inferring accurate assumptions.
    You mean imagining?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    Yeah, but I made a prediction about this thread when wolfy started it, so put your foot on the gas!
    About that sex you mentioned a few weeks ago.......... well.......... I'm still thinking about it.
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  3. #253
    royal member Rasofy's Avatar
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    -----------------

    A man builds. A parasite asks 'Where is my share?'
    A man creates. A parasite says, 'What will the neighbors think?'
    A man invents. A parasite says, 'Watch out, or you might tread on the toes of God... '


    -----------------

  4. #254
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICUP View Post
    You mean imagining?
    As one of the few wise ITPs once said, "The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination."

  5. #255
    Senior Member ICUP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    As one of the few wise ITPs once said, "The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination."
    Well, you must be a god damn genius then. <sarcastic>
    Your "friend's" site is absolutely loaded with bullshit. Try going over there and maybe you can realize with your vivid imagination that the sky is green.
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  6. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICUP View Post
    Well, you must be a god damn genius then.
    Your "friend's" site is absolutely loaded with bullshit. Try going over there and maybe you can realize with your vivid imagination that the sky is green.

  7. #257

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    This is the most random thread I have ever seen.
    Yeah, this is my type thread. C'mon... it is lucky I have S and not knowing my E, I , T or F doesn't leave me unravelled. I still have the world in front of me to keep me comfort.

  8. #258
    Senior Member ICUP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Yeah, this is my type thread. C'mon... it is lucky I have S and not knowing my E, I , T or F doesn't leave me unravelled. I still have the world in front of me to keep me comfort.
    What are you doing here? I thought we had run you off...... I agree with you, wolfy!
    Here's to S.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    Since many of your own posts contain banal stereotyping, complaining about David Keirsey's banal stereotyping is beyond hypocritical, as well as laughable.
    And I recall Jag's once again correct opinion....... which happened shortly after this whole scene began. Some N's are allowed in the Objective and Realistic, Correct Club too.
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  9. #259
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    I am changing to istp for the reasons listed below...

    I relate to istp.
    I want to see who will say no way.
    I want to throw a spanner in your typology interpretation works.
    I see your spanner, and apply my telescoping magnet to get it out of the recesses of the engine bay. Next, I ban you from the toolbox area.
    eNFJ 4w3 sx/so 468 tritype
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    Dramatic>Sensitive>Serious

  10. #260
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    I originally added this to a previous post, but figured it's worth it's own...

    This lecture is only about one personality disorder, but I think the lesson stretches to others as well.

    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSn_KOlSDp8"].[/YOUTUBE]
    From Wikipedia:

    Personality disorders, formerly referred to as character disorders, are a class of personality types and behaviors.[1][2] Personality disorders are noted on Axis II of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or DSM-IV-TR (fourth edition, text revision) of the American Psychiatric Association.

    Personality disorders are also defined by the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10), which is published by the World Health Organization. Personality disorders are categorized in ICD-10 Chapter V: Mental and behavioural disorders, specifically under Mental and behavioral disorders: 28F60-F69.29 Disorders of adult personality and behavior.[3] Personality, defined psychologically is the behavioral and mental traits that distinguish human beings. Hence, personality disorders are defined by experiences and behaviors that differ from societal norms and expectations. Those diagnosed with a personality disorder experience difficulties in cognition, emotiveness, interpersonal functioning and control of impulses. In general, personality disorders are diagnosed in 40-60 percent of psychiatric patients, which is the greatest of all psychiatric diagnoses. [4]

    These behavioral patterns in personality disorders are typically associated with severe disturbances in the behavioral tendencies of an individual, usually involving several areas of the personality, and are nearly always associated with considerable personal and social disruption. Additionally, personality disorders are inflexible and pervasive across many situations, due in large part to the fact that such behavior is ego-syntonic (i.e. the patterns are consistent with the ego integrity of the individual) and are, therefore, perceived to be appropriate by that individual. This behavior can result in maladaptive coping skills, which may lead to personal problems that induce extreme anxiety, distress and depression.[5]

    The onset of these patterns of behavior can typically be traced back to early adolescence and the beginning of adulthood and, in rarer instances, childhood.[1] General diagnostic guidelines applying to all personality disorders are presented below; supplementary descriptions are provided with each of the subtypes.

    Because the theory and diagnosis of personality disorders stem from prevailing cultural expectations, their validity is contested by some experts on the basis of invariable subjectivity. They argue that the theory and diagnosis of personality disorders are based strictly on social, or even sociopolitical and economic considerations.[6][7][8][9]
    I think the whole thing is worth reading, but the @bolded (the first line of the article) especially supports what I was saying.

    The DSM-IV lists ten personality disorders, grouped into three clusters in Axis II. The DSM also contains a category for behavioral patterns that do not match these ten disorders, but nevertheless exhibit characteristics of a personality disorder. This category is labeled Personality disorder not otherwise specified.

    Cluster A (odd or eccentric disorders)

    Paranoid personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.0): characterized by irrational suspicions and mistrust of others.

    Schizoid personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.20): lack of interest in social relationships, seeing no point in sharing time with others, anhedonia, introspection.

    Schizotypal personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.22): characterized by odd behavior or thinking.

    Cluster B (dramatic, emotional or erratic disorders)

    Antisocial personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.7): a pervasive disregard for the law and the rights of others.

    Borderline personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.83): extreme "black and white" thinking, instability in relationships, self-image, identity and behavior often leading to self-harm and impulsivity. Borderline personality disorder is diagnosed in three times as many females as males.[10]

    Histrionic personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.50): pervasive attention-seeking behavior including inappropriately seductive behavior and shallow or exaggerated emotions.

    Narcissistic personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.81): a pervasive pattern of grandiosity, need for admiration, and a lack of empathy.

    Cluster C (anxious or fearful disorders)

    Avoidant personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.82): social inhibition, feelings of inadequacy, extreme sensitivity to negative evaluation and avoidance of social interaction.

    Dependent personality disorder (DSM-IV code 301.6): pervasive psychological dependence on other people.

    Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (not the same as obsessive-compulsive disorder) (DSM-IV code 301.4): characterized by rigid conformity to rules, moral codes and excessive orderliness.

    Appendix B: Criteria Sets and Axes Provided for Further Study
    Appendix B contains the following disorders.[11] They are still widely considered amongst psychiatrists as being valid disorders, for example by Theodore Millon.[12]

    Depressive personality disorder – is a pervasive pattern of depressive cognitions and behaviors beginning by early adulthood.

    Passive-aggressive personality disorder (negativististic personality disorder) – is a pattern of negative attitudes and passive resistance in interpersonal situations.

    Deleted
    The following disorders are still considered to be valid disorders by Millon.[12] They were in DSM-III-R but were deleted from DSM-IV. Both appeared in an appendix entitled “Proposed diagnostic categories needing further study”,[13] and so did not have any concrete diagnostic criteria.

    Sadistic personality disorder – is a pervasive pattern of cruel, demeaning and aggressive behavior.

    Self-defeating personality disorder (masochistic personality disorder) – is characterised by behaviour consequently undermining the person's pleasure and goals.

    Thought these would be good to include just for reference.

    Reading through them certainly affirmed my belief that certain MBTI types will be more highly correlated with certain personality disorders than others. Interestingly, per what I said about ISTPs annoying me before (my issue with ISTPs has always been that they often seem to be downers -- just negative, feet-dragging people), and what personality disorder does celebritytypes.com say their type is overrepresented in: negativistic personality disorder. Hmmm.

    Normal personality and personality disorders

    The issue of the relationship between normal personality and personality disorders is one of the important issues in personality and clinical psychology. The personality disorders classification (DSM IV TR and ICD-10) follow categorical approach whereas the trait personality approach follows the dimensional approach. Thomas Widiger[17] has contributed to this debate significantly. He discussed the constraints of the categorical approach and argued for the dimensional approach to the personality disorders. The Five Factor Model of personality has been proposed as an alternative to the classification of personality disorders. Many studies across cultures have explored the relationship between personality disorders and the Five Factor Model [18] This talks about Five-factor translations of DSM-III-R and DSM-IV personality disorders and expounds relevance of the FFM to a variety of patient populations, including patients with borderline personality disorder, narcissism, and bulimia nervosa as well as substance abusers, psychopaths, and sex offenders.
    Well, it looks like research has been conducted about the relationship between the Big Five and BPD. And we know that Big Five is pretty highly correlated with MBTI type. So, based on those studies, we could probably find some empirical data. Interestingly, one might imagine that, for some of the personality disorders, the fifth dimension (neuroticism), which is not correlated to MBTI type, might be a strong indicator was to whether a personality disorder exists (while the other 4 letters could be used to determine their MBTI type).

    From the Big Five wikipedia article:

    Neuroticism

    Neuroticism is the tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, anxiety, or depression. It is sometimes called emotional instability. Those who score high in neuroticism are emotionally reactive and vulnerable to stress. They are more likely to interpret ordinary situations as threatening, and minor frustrations as hopelessly difficult. Their negative emotional reactions tend to persist for unusually long periods of time, which means they are often in a bad mood. These problems in emotional regulation can diminish the ability of a person scoring high on neuroticism to think clearly, make decisions, and cope effectively with stress.[citation needed]

    At the other end of the scale, individuals who score low in neuroticism are less easily upset and are less emotionally reactive. They tend to be calm, emotionally stable, and free from persistent negative feelings. Freedom from negative feelings does not mean that low scorers experience a lot of positive feelings.[citation needed]

    Sample neuroticism items
    I am easily disturbed.
    I change my mood a lot.
    I get irritated easily.
    I get stressed out easily.
    I get upset easily.
    I have frequent mood swings.
    I often feel blue.
    I worry about things.
    I am relaxed most of the time. (reversed)
    I seldom feel blue. (reversed)[33]

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