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  1. #1
    Guerilla Urbanist Brendan's Avatar
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    Default I'm going to get a dog.

    So child psychology has gotten to me. I want to be a dad. I really do. I want to raise a child and create a good human being.

    Of course. I'm not stupid. I'm not ready for a child, but I feel that at my age, this is the best and closest thing to it.

    I've decided that I want to get an Australian Shepherd with my own money. I want to pay for it, and everything. I had a huge speech planned out to give to my mother, but she said she doesn't mind as long as she's not the one taking care of it.

    I don't want her to be the one taking care of it. I want to be the one bonding with it. I want to take it to the park, play frisbee with it, introduce it to people of all shapes, colors, sizes and ages. I want to feed it, bathe it, walk it, care for it, and raise it.

    I think that this would be a good way to nurture my nurturant personality.

    I'm not sure as to wether I want a male or a female, but I know that I want a puppy who is as young as you can possibly get one. And I want an Australian Shepherd. They're good with kids, adults, strangers, and because they're herding dogs, when you call them, they come to you. I want a dog that I can walk down the street without having to keep a leash on him.

    So. I'm not sure about boy vs. girl, but I'm going to go out, get a crate, a bed, bowls and brushes, and then go and get a dog from a breeder, and I thing I'm going to post pictures when I get him. I've got my mind set. I'm going through with this and I think it's a good decision
    There is no such thing as separation from God.

  2. #2
    Senior Member HilbertSpace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brendan View Post
    I'm going through with this and I think it's a good decision
    I completely agree.

    I would recommend picking up a book if this is your first dog - I really like the ones by the monks of New Skete (they have one for puppies as well as a general one for dogs).
    JBS Haldane's Four Stages of Scientific Theories:

    1. This is worthless nonsense.
    2. This is an interesting, but perverse, point of view.
    3. This is true, but quite unimportant.
    4. I always said so.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brendan View Post
    , and then go and get a dog from a breeder

    I think you should go to the pound/spca/whateveryouhave and pick out the dog that needs you most. That's a far better lesson than getting exactly what you want under ideal conditions. And you'd be helping an animal that needs it, and not supporting the rampant over breading of dogs.

    I'd also recommend looking 12 years into the future, because the dog is likely to still be there. It's not a kid... but don't underestimate the length of time you'll need to be around.

  4. #4
    Senior Member HilbertSpace's Avatar
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    Given that it's his first dog, and that he has a really good idea about breed and personality, I think a professional breeder is his best bet.

    I am very much in favor of rescued dogs - don't get me wrong. I've even toyed with the idea of starting my own breed-based rescue when my situation allows. But a well bred dog from a reputable breeder is more of a known quantity, which is important with a first dog, and very important if you have expectations about what kind of dog you want. A lot of the characteristics he's looking for are really part of the Aussie breed (Border Collies are good in those areas also).
    JBS Haldane's Four Stages of Scientific Theories:

    1. This is worthless nonsense.
    2. This is an interesting, but perverse, point of view.
    3. This is true, but quite unimportant.
    4. I always said so.

  5. #5
    Senior Member nottaprettygal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brendan View Post
    They're good with kids, adults, strangers, and because they're herding dogs, when you call them, they come to you. I want a dog that I can walk down the street without having to keep a leash on him.
    If you really want a dog that's going to simulate a child, shouldn't you get one that never listens or comes to you when you call him/her?

  6. #6
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HilbertSpace View Post
    Given that it's his first dog, and that he has a really good idea about breed and personality, I think a professional breeder is his best bet.

    I am very much in favor of rescued dogs - don't get me wrong. I've even toyed with the idea of starting my own breed-based rescue when my situation allows. But a well bred dog from a reputable breeder is more of a known quantity, which is important with a first dog, and very important if you have expectations about what kind of dog you want. A lot of the characteristics he's looking for are really part of the Aussie breed (Border Collies are good in those areas also).
    I don't disagree, but do take exception to why he wants the dog. If it's about wanting to nuture and train, identifing a 'breed' that will do that ignores the whole purpose. It's like saying I want a kid, but one that is "this" and "that". It's sidestepping the whole issue. The breed matters, sure... but the lesson isn't in getting a breed that listens, it's about training what you have. Don't idealize the concept of a dog, or a breed.

    But perhaps you are right, though a collie wouldn't be my first choice for a nurturing dog. They are a bit more... uhh... neurotic... compared to a more loving stable breed like labs or retrievers. And they listen too.

    On that note, I gotta make plans to take my collie/black lab sheep herding. I keep forgetting to do it!

  7. #7
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brendan View Post
    I'm not sure as to wether I want a male or a female, but I know that I want a puppy who is as young as you can possibly get one. And I want an Australian Shepherd. They're good with kids, adults, strangers, and because they're herding dogs, when you call them, they come to you. I want a dog that I can walk down the street without having to keep a leash on him.
    Congratulations on your decision. It's a good idea to read up. I underlined the one sentence because animals can be emotionally scarred and/or socialized incorrectly if taken from their mothers too early. Find out about the breed you want and what is considered the healthy age for them to be adopted. They should at least be weaned.

    There are few things as pure as a dog's love. They deserve the best from their humans.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

    I want to be just like my mother, even if she is bat-shit crazy.

  8. #8

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    Great choice - Australian Shepherds are great dogs with great personalities.

    Please, please, please - make sure you do the whole obedience school thing. Find a good obedience instructor by asking around or looking on-line. I discourage you from going to PetsMart or any of the large pet store chains. In addition to teaching your dog manners and basic commands, obedience will also help with the bonding process and establish you as the Alpha. Australian Shepherds are quick learners so you shouldn't have any problems. The key is consistency! Our trainers utilized clicker training which I am a strong proponent of.

    Also get some books on the bread so you know what to expect. For the life I me, I can't remember the name of a book I used when Ellie was a puppy, but I've heard good things about "The Art of Raising a Puppy."
    Amazon.com: The Art of Raising a Puppy: Books: The Monks of New Skete

    I also suggest crate training, at least until your puppy is housebroken. Crate training is also a great behavioral tool as well.

    Good luck!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Dansker's Avatar
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    Dogs are great companions and can bring an owner tremendous joy.

    The Australian Shepherd is a spirited and energetic dog with loads of personality. They will need a fair bit of exercise and respond well to training.

    Best wishes with the acquisition of you dog.

  10. #10
    Senior Member niffer's Avatar
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    ..doggie
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