User Tag List

View Poll Results: Why do you hate Sci-Fi?

Voters
12. You may not vote on this poll
  • It's boring.

    8 66.67%
  • It's icky...I don't really know.

    3 25.00%
  • It's stupid and unrealistic.

    4 33.33%
  • It scares me.

    2 16.67%
  • It doesn't scare me now, but scared me as a child and that left an impression.

    5 41.67%
Multiple Choice Poll.
First 2230313233 Last

Results 311 to 320 of 330

  1. #311
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    I was looking at your reasons for your hate. One of the reasons you stated for hating sci-fi is the perceived "danger" of losing connection to the environment or what is supposedly "natural", including switching from human labor to robotic labor.
    "Supposedly" natural? You mean like flowers, trees, fresh air, clean water, animals and plants? Yeah, it's not just a PERCEIVED danger...industrialism was progress and technology and it began destroying our environment. You have to have everything in moderation. No, I don't want to live in a metal and concrete world.

    And yes, in some cases robotic labor is taking people's jobs.

    These are legitimate concerns and it doesn't mean I don't like technology or appreciate modern medicine. This isn't a black and white thing, don't be absurd.

  2. #312
    Probably Most Brilliant Craft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    N/A
    Posts
    1,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EffEmDoubleyou View Post
    A greater survival rate is a debatable benefit. It's dependent on quality of life. If we live longer, but we work harder, see our families less, and enjoy fewer pleasures, who cares?
    Is losing social connection and pleasure really widespread? How much? Does this problem outweigh the "biological life" problem? Or isn't it necessary to 'problemize' basic necessities first before this problem you mentioned?

    My opinion is that we don't work harder than in the past, and that we would have more leisure time given further technology. We are still at a point where economic crisis destroys jobs and living. I mean, The overall point of working, for most people, is to have more money in order to create more freedom.

    Second, it cripples our economy the way we spend so many resources to get people from 88 to 91 just because we can, regardless of the life that person lives for three years. To your second point, impoverished countries are still impoverished. They were impoverished in the 19th century, the 20th century and now the 21st century despite the explosion of technology. Your ideas about technology creating productivity to create charity seem to make sense, but so does trickle-down economics. We all know how that worked out.
    um, I don't think technological development trickles down economies. It's actually the opposite: More production. New medicine or health means a new businesses. What creates economic disarray lies in the political-economic system itself. The rich not being taxed enough and such. And people are not so selfless that they their donations would destroy themselves.

  3. #313
    Probably Most Brilliant Craft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    N/A
    Posts
    1,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    "Supposedly" natural? You mean like flowers, trees, fresh air, clean water, animals and plants?
    Natural is a vague concept. I find "development" natural. But I guess you're only talking about non-manmade things.

    Yeah, it's not just a PERCEIVED danger...industrialism was progress and technology and it began destroying our environment. You have to have everything in moderation. No, I don't want to live in a metal and concrete world.

    And yes, in some cases robotic labor is taking people's jobs.

    These are legitimate concerns and it doesn't mean I don't like technology or appreciate modern medicine. This isn't a black and white thing, don't be absurd.
    Sci-fi isn't just about social problems. And why not live in a metal world if it helps the physical lives of you and many?

    Man, I always have a hard time conversing with you. >.>

  4. #314
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post

    Sci-fi isn't just about social problems. And why not live in a metal world if it helps the physical lives of you and many?

    Because life wouldn't be worth living?

    Man, I always have a hard time conversing with you. >.>
    K.

  5. #315
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,487

    Default

    What I find funny is that these are precisely the sorts of questions that science fiction likes to explore. And hardly any of them treat it like a black and white issue. Straight out pro-robot and scientific progress stories haven't been in fashion since probably the 60's.

  6. #316
    Probably Most Brilliant Craft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    N/A
    Posts
    1,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    Because life wouldn't be worth living?
    You'd choose death(of many even) over life with metal? yep, this is what i don't get. also, selfish.

    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    What I find funny is that these are precisely the sorts of questions that science fiction likes to explore. And hardly any of them treat it like a black and white issue. Straight out pro-robot and scientific progress stories haven't been in fashion since probably the 60's.
    I think that's actually quite a positive, in the part of sci-fi books. Their warning us about the possible dangers of future forms of technological management. Then again, too much of it scares people, which then hinders development. No reason to hate 'em though.

  7. #317
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    You'd choose death(of many even) over life with metal? yep, this is what i don't get. also, selfish.
    Yes, if life was lived in a metal pod, yes I'd choose death, and I think I'd be doing the majority of the population a favor because I'm quite certain they don't want to live that way either. There's a small percentage of crazy freaks who want to live in aluminum cages on Mars.

  8. #318
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Well I'll let you get back to your weekly religious meeting.

  9. #319
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,487

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    I think that's actually quite a positive, in the part of sci-fi books. Their warning us about the possible dangers of future forms of technological management. Then again, too much of it scares people, which then hinders development. No reason to hate 'em though.
    It's a lot of people's opinions on Michael Crichton's novels is that the main message is that science is bad. FYI, I'm not a fan of Crichton at all. But as far as the evils of science go, it is best to err on the side of caution. The last short story I read was pretty refreshing. It was technically set in a technically apocolyptic future, but it was a very beautiful and natural setting where people had to restrain their impact on the environment to recovery from what we had done. A reviewer described it as 'bucolic', I had to look up that word. I suppose the story showed that we could live well with restraint, and maybe we shouldn't wait till it is imposed on us.

  10. #320
    Probably Most Brilliant Craft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    N/A
    Posts
    1,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    Yes, if life was lived in a metal pod, yes I'd choose death, and I think I'd be doing the majority of the population a favor because I'm quite certain they don't want to live that way either. There's a small percentage of crazy freaks who want to live in aluminum cages on Mars.
    What? Cages? We're not talking about the same "metal housing." I'm talking about advanced hygiene procedures, transportation, communication devices, and the such. I'm talking about a house filled with technologies. Who wouldn't want the luxury of good food served(not by anyone but by a technology) in the next day? Who wouldn't want a better toilet?

    Who would escape earth in exchange for all these? Just by the mention of "food", you'd have billions from Africa.

Similar Threads

  1. An Idea for a Science Fiction Thriller based on neuroscience
    By grey_beard in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-20-2015, 04:31 PM
  2. Who are your Top Ten Favorite Fictional People
    By ladypinkington in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 187
    Last Post: 01-10-2015, 06:29 AM
  3. Replies: 42
    Last Post: 09-08-2011, 08:09 AM
  4. What is the purpose of Science Fiction?
    By The Ü™ in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 03-04-2008, 06:53 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-28-2007, 01:32 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO