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  1. #1
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Default How does your mind work when reading?

    Are you able to follow the book with its approach?
    Does your mind drift?
    Do you end up with more questions than the book offer?
    Or something completely different?

    I ask because this is something that has always frustrated me immensely. For example i am currently reading a book about the meaning of life. From a philosophical standpoint, of course there are going to be differing views and i enjoy hearing conflicting theories. However, once i start reading, i start considering this idea or that idea, then i need to find information to get more information then look at different viewpoint in regards to that information so i create myself more work yet i know i am not going to get an unbiased account. I would love to be able to sit and read and get through a book without questioning the why this or why that.

    Trying to find a positive spin on all of this, i suppose at least i am keeping my mind active. Now only if i could retain the information then it wouldn't be in vain. The sad thing is, i won't stop either as as much as it frustrates me, i enjoy reading differing accounts and questioning peoples theories.

    See, and even writing this. I've spent the last 10 mins trying to word this in such a way to bring it together yet feel like i've failed because i've got too many ideas bouncing around my mind that i'm trying to figure out myself thus reaching some kind of conclusion yet it's not happening. Blah.

    Any thoughts??
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

  2. #2
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Depending on how well written the book, what works for me is to get into an acceptance "zone" where anything's possible and the information is just information for consumption. Then, post completion of the book, I start to bounce the ideas around until the concepts are accepted or rejected.

    This won't work with purported non-fictional works, if their logic stream isn't logically. Then my mind tears the book apart, making it difficult to continue reading.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Lol. Fiction is definitely easier to read but i especially enjoy reading non fiction and will never accept someones word as gospel. Its like i enjoy teasing myself by questioning someones logic then finding evidence to support or reject their logic yet i'm aware their logic may be flawed. So i come back full circle with no real answers but more questions.
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

  4. #4
    Senior Member Santosha's Avatar
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    With informational books I jump around alot.
    I skim quite a bit, extracting what I find meaningful or useful.

    On more than one occasion I've read books backward to forward, but its the exception.

    I tend to have more questions than answers after reading. I get irritated when a really good book ends. It's not enough, I want more. I want to know what happens to the charactors.. what do they go on to do.

    I've been known to read multiple books at once. This is almost always a sign that I'm just not into them. When I come across a good enough book, I can lock myself away for hours.. sometimes days.
    Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun - Watts

  5. #5
    Glycerine
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    It really depends on my purpose.

    If I have to read 200+ pages for a test 7 hours later at 9:00 in the morning, I read the text thoroughly once through and my mind usually picks out important concepts. Figure out the general patterns, concepts and then associate the specific examples to further cement them in my head.

    If it's lit reviews, I mainly read the introduction, results, interpretations, and conclusions.

    If something is too wordy, I summarize each paragraph/section it in my head with a few words/phrases/sentences and draw my own conclusions using the mental summaries. I am a "get to the point" type of person.

    If it is just for fun, I read until I am mentally exhausted, ponder the information (go on many mental tangents), then read again.

  6. #6
    ThatGirl
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    I usually skim books couple sentences at a time, looking for general theme's that interest me. I get a round about idea of what the book is talking about, and a little more detail when I slow down to really take in certain paragraphs. If I am reading fiction, I have to slow my mind down, and remember to imagine the scene, though more and more lately, this is becoming more difficult. I cant get "into" a book like I used to.

    Afterward, depending on how new the concepts were, I think about it. Or, it gets stored until some situation causes me to recall the concept of it, and I apply the knowledge then.

  7. #7
    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
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    I need everything to make sense and see how all the parts relate to each other. I get frustrated when this isn't made clear to me or they needlessly complicate things by having pretentious wording just so the author thinks of himself as smart.

    My mind wanders alot when reading and this is true whether or not I'm enjoying the book. The difference is when I'm enjoying the book, I'm imagining what it would really be like to be that person, to live in that time and place, to anticipate what's going to happen next. With a not-so-good book, my mind will wander off to things that are completely unrelated to the book.

    I also like books to answer my questions by the end of it. In stories, I don't like having endings that are too open-ended.
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  8. #8
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    I have found that the only way I can greatly understand what I am reading is if I read it out loud, putting inflections for me to hear and deem what's important. Without the inflections I can't always find the point in the paragraphs that I read. Needless to say libraries are not the best place for me to read.

  9. #9
    ThatGirl
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReflecTcelfeR View Post
    I have found that the only way I can greatly understand what I am reading is if I read it out loud, putting inflections for me to hear and deem what's important. Without the inflections I can't always find the point in the paragraphs that I read. Needless to say libraries are not the best place for me to read.
    Reflec is a dork!






    Did you just say that out loud?

  10. #10
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatGirl View Post
    Reflec is a dork!




    Did you just say that out loud?
    Heeeeyyyy...Yes, hahaha.

    My mind gets lost in all the words if I can't hear them. It's how I keep focused.

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