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  1. #21
    Senior Member InTheFlesh's Avatar
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    Disengaging from that which surrounds you in an emotional of physical sense? What do they mean by caring in that context, like the generic kind of hippy 'love' type outlook or otherwise? Do you have any authors that you'd recommend?

    Haha it's not a bad thing to dislike text like that, it can be hard to keep going after a while if you're not invested in it, so it's understandable. It sounds like I'm just going along with it, but that's what I was trying to explain but couldn't exactly find the right words to. It's like finding a map that leads to treasure in a dark cave each step gets more and more exciting.

  2. #22
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    the easiest introduction in straight philosophical form would be the Tao Te Ching... it's a classic as far as the stillness type of thought goes and is a peaceful read (there's even an app for that )... for a nice story with some interesting ideas thrown in you can't go wrong with Journey to the West!

    the thing I hate the most is when you get just a glimpse of an idea that has an interesting feel to it and you can't get back to that same wonder and that same feeling of awe that you had... there's no way to grasp that one moment of seeing it new again... frustrating :steam:

    of course, I also consider it depressing that there's no way that I'll EVER get to learn everything and see everything that is out there even on this planet before I'm going to die... reincarnation with retained memories would be awesome!
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  3. #23
    Senior Member InTheFlesh's Avatar
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    I'll look that up, it seems interesting enough to read a bit about. Story lines have never really been my thing in books, though. I'd much rather read non-fiction, as it just is more captivating to me. Another opposite, I like walls of text with the occasional proof haha.

    I can't think of any instances where I've felt that exactly, but along those lines, it really bothers me when I'm close to understanding a concept, but I get stuck in the same position one step from understanding, asking the same questions with different phrasing without noticing it. It makes me feel like a moron thinking back on it

    That's a good thing, you'll always have more to see/do until you pass away. I think the infinite opportunities just make for a more diverse and truly unique life! You'll always have the chance to do things that those around you never would have done, which is the same for them. It's like an infinite loop of knowledge/experience

  4. #24
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    the more you know the more you are curious about it seems... that's why things like dictionaries and wikipedia are black holes for time

    not finding the answer that you're looking for is absolutley horrible... like when you try and type every search prompt into your search engine trying to find information on something and keep getting the wrong results (and in my case it's usually the result of careless spelling mistakes as opposed to asking the same question in different ways each different time!)

    I'll read fiction, I'll read non-fiction- as long as there's something there to interest me I'm quite happy to read and read! If what I'm reading can mentally take me somewhere else that's the extra bonus... I was afraid as a kid that the real world would NEVER live up to my expectations
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  5. #25
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by InTheFlesh View Post
    Haha I know what it is, but I think it focuses on discourse more than a lack of universal truth. Sure, writers like Baudrillard goes insane on the topic of truth and reality, but I consider the theories like that to be their own section of post-modernism, whereas almost all post-modernists look to discourse.

    Heidegger isn't a post-modernist, his conception of the human daesin is in direct conflict with the near ontological-nihilism that characterizes much of post-modernity. I don't know if I'd consider Derrida a post-modernist or a post-structuralist, because I've heard different accounts of his work but never read it myself.

    I just finished a short overview of Foucault and plan on starting in on Discipline and Punish before the summer is over. I'm somewhat weary of reading Lyotard's work though, as what I've heard people say about his theories makes me think I'll be pounding my head on the wall every few pages. I think Deleuze & Guattari are one of the most important branches of post-modernism though, with their work on desire and normalizing discourses, so let's not forget them in a summary of the school of thought.
    Eh... Discourse?

    My friend has read a decent amount of Kant, and for around 2 months almost every conversation we had involved Critique of Pure Reason in some form or another. I'm really interested in his explanation of human understanding of existence as perceived only through space and time, but I don't think it'd be worth working through his notably dense writing for the one strain of his theory.
    Judging from peoples' opinions of Kant online, it seems the consensus that they all want to buy his Critique of Pure Reason just to throw it out the window as they gnaw their fingers off for ever attempting to understand it. However, I don't think I would have come to truly understand analytical knowledge, or synthetic knowledge without it. While Kant noted that analytical knowledge is basically just a bunch of tautologies, it's useful in that you can create systematic "blocks" of thought, which help you structure your understanding of the world. ie. structuralism. On the other hand, a priori synthetic knowledge... or, maybe you could call it imagination that corresponds with something real, was useful in the Copernican Revolution. Heliocentric ideas wouldn't have come about if it weren't for a distrust in empirical observation.

    Intellectual masturbation is great.
    Deleuze and Guattari have an interesting justification for taking part in philosophy, however basic it may be. I imagine in simple terms it sounding a bit like, "because we can." They go on to talk about it in a way that in my head related it to why technology improves on an almost linear path, where as those creating the new technology are payed to do so, philosophers are payed off both by the intellectual satisfaction gained from solidifying a theory as well as the money book sales brings in.

    I think philosophy as intellectual masturbation is ideal, having the ability to look at it like a sci-fi novel, creating a vision of the world that is far out there, but still forcing you to justify it in a convincing, logical way. Though Baudrillard would have an extreme problem with this.
    Ok. To each their own.

  6. #26
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    why read the philosophies of the dead instead of listen to those of the living?
    The philosophies of the dead had a direct impact on the philosophies of the living. It's about getting to the source.

  7. #27
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    :steam: dammit... you just HAD to say The Source and make me think of this guy:

    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  8. #28
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    I like to hear new things... it's like the age old human desire to see something that nobody else has seen before, like how thrilled I was when I got to help explore a wild cave that had recently been discovered... I got to crawl through a tight space filled with water to see an entire cavern on my own because nobody who had been through that way the day before had been able to fit through and the thought that "wow... this is NEW... I'm the first person to get to see this!" was downright awe inspiring

    the importance that some people put on reading old philosophies while remaining completely out of touch with anything that's occurring in the present or possible future astounds me
    Some people feel they were born after their time. Why would anyone investigate their family tree? Why would anyone study history, biology, or cosmology? To me, it's about knowing where you came from, and if you're lucky, pulling old ideas up because in the present, they're unheard of. Old-new ideas.

  9. #29
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    :steam: dammit... you just HAD to say The Source and make me think of this guy:

    Who's he and why does he want to seductively interrogate someone?

  10. #30
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
    Some people feel they were born after their time. Why would anyone investigate their family tree? Why would anyone study history, biology, or cosmology? To me, it's about knowing where you came from, and if you're lucky, pulling old ideas up because in the present, they're unheard of. Old-new ideas.
    as for family trees, investigating your ancestors tends to convince a person that they've been conceived by a long line of total bastards and probably should be up to no good instead of poking around through family history

    but my thoughts are why spend an incredible amount of time reading about other people's lives when you could be living your own and accomplishing your own acheivements? as far as I know I'm only going to live once, so I'd sure as hell better get some living in somewhere
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

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