User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 53

  1. #11
    Ginkgo
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by senza_tema View Post
    "Respectable" is a dull word; do you believe it does them justice?
    Not even this does


  2. #12
    Senior Member InTheFlesh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Enneagram
    CFV
    Posts
    276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
    Postmodernism is basically the philosophy that there is no universal truth, and that grand narratives such as the Communist Manifesto, the Bible, and the Koran should be treated with suspicion. There's not much else to say about it, but ,Martin Heidegger, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Jean-François Lyotard are all important names to consider. The consequences of postmodernity have been good, bad, but ultimately interesting in politics, pop culture, science, art, and even architecture.

    I like Kant and Thomas Aquinas. I think they were both extremely respectable.
    Haha I know what it is, but I think it focuses on discourse more than a lack of universal truth. Sure, writers like Baudrillard goes insane on the topic of truth and reality, but I consider the theories like that to be their own section of post-modernism, whereas almost all post-modernists look to discourse.

    Heidegger isn't a post-modernist, his conception of the human daesin is in direct conflict with the near ontological-nihilism that characterizes much of post-modernity. I don't know if I'd consider Derrida a post-modernist or a post-structuralist, because I've heard different accounts of his work but never read it myself.

    I just finished a short overview of Foucault and plan on starting in on Discipline and Punish before the summer is over. I'm somewhat weary of reading Lyotard's work though, as what I've heard people say about his theories makes me think I'll be pounding my head on the wall every few pages. I think Deleuze & Guattari are one of the most important branches of post-modernism though, with their work on desire and normalizing discourses, so let's not forget them in a summary of the school of thought.

    My friend has read a decent amount of Kant, and for around 2 months almost every conversation we had involved Critique of Pure Reason in some form or another. I'm really interested in his explanation of human understanding of existence as perceived only through space and time, but I don't think it'd be worth working through his notably dense writing for the one strain of his theory.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
    I currently have my back turned to philosophy because philosophers tend to be chronic masturbators of the highest caliber.
    Intellectual masturbation is great.
    Deleuze and Guattari have an interesting justification for taking part in philosophy, however basic it may be. I imagine in simple terms it sounding a bit like, "because we can." They go on to talk about it in a way that in my head related it to why technology improves on an almost linear path, where as those creating the new technology are payed to do so, philosophers are payed off both by the intellectual satisfaction gained from solidifying a theory as well as the money book sales brings in.

    I think philosophy as intellectual masturbation is ideal, having the ability to look at it like a sci-fi novel, creating a vision of the world that is far out there, but still forcing you to justify it in a convincing, logical way. Though Baudrillard would have an extreme problem with this.

  3. #13
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Enneagram
    827 sp/so
    Posts
    20,123

    Default

    why read the philosophies of the dead instead of listen to those of the living?
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  4. #14
    Senior Member InTheFlesh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Enneagram
    CFV
    Posts
    276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    why read the philosophies of the dead instead of listen to those of the living?
    I don't prefer one over the other, it's just not often that I meet people interested in philosophy beyond my best friend. And theories created by those who are now dead are still legitimate as well as entertaining, death doesn't cancel that out.

    How come you think listening to the living is better than the dead?
    (I'm not trying to sound condescending or anything, I'm just genuinely curious.)

  5. #15
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Enneagram
    827 sp/so
    Posts
    20,123

    Default

    I like to hear new things... it's like the age old human desire to see something that nobody else has seen before, like how thrilled I was when I got to help explore a wild cave that had recently been discovered... I got to crawl through a tight space filled with water to see an entire cavern on my own because nobody who had been through that way the day before had been able to fit through and the thought that "wow... this is NEW... I'm the first person to get to see this!" was downright awe inspiring

    the importance that some people put on reading old philosophies while remaining completely out of touch with anything that's occurring in the present or possible future astounds me
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  6. #16
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12,409

    Default

    Can you dance the Vaginkgo?

  7. #17
    Senior Member InTheFlesh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Enneagram
    CFV
    Posts
    276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    I like to hear new things... it's like the age old human desire to see something that nobody else has seen before, like how thrilled I was when I got to help explore a wild cave that had recently been discovered... I got to crawl through a tight space filled with water to see an entire cavern on my own because nobody who had been through that way the day before had been able to fit through and the thought that "wow... this is NEW... I'm the first person to get to see this!" was downright awe inspiring

    the importance that some people put on reading old philosophies while remaining completely out of touch with anything that's occurring in the present or possible future astounds me

    I understand that. While not everything is completely new to our race, as the cave you visited, what's relatively new gives me the same feeling.

    For example, ever since I met him, my best friend was always waaaaay ahead of me in terms of philosophical knowledge, both in theory and theorists. I could bring up an author who was new to me, and without thinking twice he would explain who the person was, and what they accomplished. I pretty much thought I was always going to be the student to his teaching. Then, however, I started reading present-day post-modernism, then continuing to find out that he knew almost nothing about the topic. That gave me the opetunity to teach him a little bit about a topic that he was completely unfamiliar with, and it gave me just about the same feeling I assume you had. For the rest of the day I was in a great mood with a huge smile on my face, nothing could have brought me down from the high I was feeling from simply being the first person I knew to discover this philosophical cavern.

    If we want to talk about it in MBTI terms, I'd say we both like the same feeling of finding the knew and undiscovered, but where as you seek these things through awe-inducing images (Se), I look for it in philosophy that has the ability to destroy my conception of how things work (Ni).

    If you're wondering why I assumed you were Se dominant, it's because I remember seeing you on the forums when I frequented last summer with ESTP as a title. I may well remember incorrectly.

  8. #18
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Enneagram
    827 sp/so
    Posts
    20,123

    Default

    I have many interests and can be many types

    new ideas are as much of a thrill as new images and experiences... all can fall into the category of "new playthings" to toss about intellectually or physically until the shiny wears off and it's time to find something new and once you get the hang of things you can seamlessly stream from one interest to the other

    the word "philosophy" always bores me half to death with the thoughts of boring teachers droning on and on about things in a way that could make even dinosaurs living in black holes and eating mimes for breakfast seem boring... discussing ideas seems much more thrilling to me somehow. And if philosophers would learn to write in a manner that appeared less like WALLS OF TEXT I may be more inclined to read the originals of their works- which might explain why I've read more eastern philosophy than western come to think of it
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  9. #19
    Senior Member InTheFlesh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Enneagram
    CFV
    Posts
    276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    I have many interests and can be many types

    new ideas are as much of a thrill as new images and experiences... all can fall into the category of "new playthings" to toss about intellectually or physically until the shiny wears off and it's time to find something new and once you get the hang of things you can seamlessly stream from one interest to the other

    the word "philosophy" always bores me half to death with the thoughts of boring teachers droning on and on about things in a way that could make even dinosaurs living in black holes and eating mimes for breakfast seem boring... discussing ideas seems much more thrilling to me somehow. And if philosophers would learn to write in a manner that appeared less like WALLS OF TEXT I may be more inclined to read the originals of their works- which might explain why I've read more eastern philosophy than western come to think of it
    Right, I know exactly what you mean. I went through a phase where all I was reading was written by a guy named Jean Baudrillard purely because he was so off the wall that reading his texts blew my mind over and over again every few pages. But when it stopped having that shock value, I started to see his philosophy differently, mainly as flawed, then looking for other sources that aroused interest.

    That's interesting as well, it's always been something that seemed mysterious and intuitively interesting to me. When you referenced dinosaurs as something that would normally seem interesting I was immediately thrown off, because things like that have always been far from fun for me to study, where as I love hearing lectures on topics like philosophy. The walls of text written by old philosophers can end up forming some of the most beautiful images of reality that I've ever seen. Eastern philosophy seems like a distant cousin that I have no way to contact, I don't know whether I'd like or dislike it. What are some of the main concepts?

  10. #20
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Enneagram
    827 sp/so
    Posts
    20,123

    Default

    that would entirely depend on what philosophy you were speaking of really... there's definite differences between them

    currently I have the quote "your compassion is incomplete if it does not include yourself" in my binder as a reminder, for a little clip in a way- there's a variety of views from disengaging from that which surrounds you to caring about every living thing...

    there are gnats with attention spans longer than mine, which may explain the wall of text aversion

    I tend to be fascinated with anything that I can read that makes me feel, if even for just a moment, like I've almost glimpsed something that I can't quite put my finger on- almost a creeping feeling of "holy shit- I had no idea! "... like discovering that there's layers and layers of texture to reality that you can only see through tiny tears in the reality that you understand in a way
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

Similar Threads

  1. [MBTItm] NFJs talk to me about your J
    By Virtual ghost in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 12-29-2010, 07:38 PM
  2. If you need help with functions and your type...
    By Thursday in forum What's my Type?
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-09-2010, 07:33 PM
  3. [MBTItm] Do you get along with people of your own type?
    By fidelia in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-11-2009, 12:46 PM
  4. [INTJ] Best way to approach "feeeeelings" talks with INTJs
    By Eileen in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 07-25-2008, 04:16 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO