User Tag List

First 678910 Last

Results 71 to 80 of 131

  1. #71
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    somehow I feel a lot more in common with people who are a few years older than me than with kids born in the late 80s or early 90s (I was born in 1983... in the sticks)... family and home based values interest me less than they apparently should I guess

    and everyone has their own personal values, so judging based on when we're born as far as our personally held values is getting towards the sensibility of judging us on our personalities based on when we're born (aka the zodiac) :rolli:
    And that makes sense that you have more in common with those that are a few years older over the ones who are younger. To me, these changes are gradual, not abrupt.

    While certainly not true, there are general shifts on how a group tend to see things. Have one person wanting to change something, and pretty soon, it spreads like wildfire. That's how the American Independence occurred, that is how the Civil War abrupted, that is how the Civil Rights Movement went into full swing, and yada yada.

  2. #72
    Senior Member esidebill's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    341

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    And that makes sense that you have more in common with those that are a few years older over the ones who are younger. To me, these changes are gradual, not abrupt.

    While certainly not true, there are general shifts on how a group tend to see things. Have one person wanting to change something, and pretty soon, it spreads like wildfire. That's how the American Independence occurred, that is how the Civil War abrupted, that is how the Civil Rights Movement went into full swing, and yada yada.
    I doubt those changes started with one person wanting change, but it was probably a thought shared by many that perhaps one person allowed many to speak about due to the courage effect.
    "Others should not judge what you truly are, instead you should find yourself. You may find yourself in a bowl of cereal or dreaming of the unknown, but make sure it is you who finds you." - Myself


    ENTP
    Extroverted (E) 56.76% Introverted (I) 43.24%
    Intuitive (N) 64.29% Sensing (S) 35.71%
    Thinking (T) 62.5% Feeling (F) 37.5%
    Perceiving (P) 75% Judging (J) 25%

    9w8 SP/SX
    Neutral

  3. #73
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    And that makes sense that you have more in common with those that are a few years older over the ones who are younger. To me, these changes are gradual, not abrupt.

    While certainly not true, there are general shifts on how a group tend to see things. Have one person wanting to change something, and pretty soon, it spreads like wildfire. That's how the American Independence occurred, that is how the Civil War abrupted, that is how the Civil Rights Movement went into full swing, and yada yada.
    Well I have things in common with people both a few years younger and few years older than me.

    Time is an illusion. The generations don't split perfectly at midnight December 31, 1981. That's a load of bullshit.

    There are some sources which indicate that Gen Y actually began in 1977, others which say 1982.

    But my point is...why does a 9 year old necessarily feel more impact from something than an 8 year old? And don't you think an 8 year old and a 10 year old would view a world event more similarly than people ten to twenty years older than themselves who are arbitrarily thrown into their "generation"?

    Some people my age probably weren't even that aware collapse of the Soviet Union/Berlin Wall things because they didn't care, or their parents didn't care, or they were just less educated or something. I think the way it impacted me had largely to do with how politically minded my grandfather was and how much the importance of world politics and geography was impressed upon me from such a young age.

    My grandfather had the same impact on one my nephews right before he died. He lived with my mom in his worst declining years, she cared for him, and my nephew was around him so much, that by 5th grade my nephew had the highest Social Studies score on the West Test in his entire district.

  4. #74
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    Well I have things in common with people both a few years younger and few years older than me.

    Time is an illusion. The generations don't split perfectly at midnight December 31, 1981. That's a load of bullshit.

    There are some sources which indicate that Gen Y actually began in 1977, others which say 1982.

    But my point is...why does a 9 year old necessarily feel more impact from something than an 8 year old? And don't you think an 8 year old and a 10 year old would view a world event more similarly than people ten to twenty years older than themselves who are arbitrarily thrown into their "generation"?

    Some people my age probably weren't even that aware collapse of the Soviet Union/Berlin Wall things because they didn't care, or their parents didn't care, or they were just less educated or something. I think the way it impacted me had largely to do with how politically minded my grandfather was and how much the importance of world politics and geography was impressed upon me from such a young age.

    My grandfather had the same impact on one my nephews right before he died. He lived with my mom in his worst declining years, she cared for him, and my nephew was around him so much, that by 5th grade my nephew had the highest Social Studies score on the West Test in his entire district.
    I lived in a small world as a kid. My eyes did not open until middle school, which was exactly the time that 9/11 occurred (even though the day was suppose to go by as I watched my cartoons.) Since I went to a year round school where I was off in September, I got to see first hand on T.V. everything that happened from early morning PST to late at night when I heard helicopters buzzing over the neighborhood. The repeated images of the planes crashing into the WTC, people jumping off of the WTC, a few people being at the top of the WTC waiting for a helicopter, both buildings collapsing, people running from the collapse, the hundreds of missing photos plastered all over the walls and people crying for their love ones, the death count rising by the day as NYC was filled with smoke.

    On the same note, I would think that the people in elementary school at the time would have a more diluted sense of what was going on (even the 5th and 6th graders.) Some people having school ending early without much of knowing why. Some being shielded from what happened until later. I didn't know much of the world until that day happened, not even about how they had a government shutdown in the 90's.

    In some ways, it can happen. Heck, what is even funny was how my siblings would tell me I should get my act together before I went to middle school as they were literally telling me that elementary school was different from middle school.

  5. #75
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    I lived in a small world as a kid. My eyes did not open until middle school, which was exactly the time that 9/11 occurred (even though the day was suppose to go by as I watched my cartoons.) Since I went to a year round school where I was off in September, I got to see first hand on T.V. everything that happened from early morning PST to late at night when I heard helicopters buzzing over the neighborhood. The repeated images of the planes crashing into the WTC, people jumping off of the WTC, a few people being at the top of the WTC waiting for a helicopter, both buildings collapsing, people running from the collapse, the hundreds of missing photos plastered all over the walls and people crying for their love ones, the death count rising by the day as NYC was filled with smoke.

    On the same note, I would think that the people in elementary school at the time would have a more diluted sense of what was going on (even the 5th and 6th graders.) Some people having school ending early without much of knowing why. Some being shielded from what happened until later. I didn't know much of the world until that day happened, not even about how they had a government shutdown in the 90's.

    In some ways, it can happen. Heck, what is even funny was how my siblings would tell me I should get my act together before I went to middle school as they were literally telling me that elementary school was different from middle school.
    This is why I say that world events have more of an impact on older teenagers, at least middle schoolers more than elementary school children. Since I was old enough to be very conscious of 9/11, it will still be an important event in my life, but distinctly different than Berlin Wall/Soviet Collapse. I had strong political opinions and clues about why 9/11 was happening. It scared me just as much as it may have scared a child, but I had a very firm political grasp of the world by that point.

    This is probably similar to people who were at least late teens up to early 30's when everything was happening in Eastern Europe. They were very conscious of it. Very affected by it. Had very strong ideological opinions.

    Me, on the other hand, apparently developed a very romantic attachment to anything Russian because..I WAS A CHILD. To me, it was a blur of news broadcasts and my grandparents telling me that Russian people would spend outrageous amounts of money for name brand American jeans or tennis shoes, and some had to stand in line for bread. It was a myth about a little girl named Anastasia Romanov, because all of this stuff going on had deep roots in something that happened 60 or 70 years earlier. It was about Mikhail Baryshnikov and the Bolshoi Ballet and gymnasts and STUFF THAT HAD NO REAL POLITICAL IMPORTANCE. Reagan and Gorbechev were talking heads to me. Gorbechev had a funny birthmark on his head. Reagan was this god who had saved the world from nuclear destruction. World peace. Freedom. All I knew is that it made me cry when I saw people in Germany and then in Soviet countries being happy. It emotionally impacted me. I knew it meant something HUGE in the larger human experience.

    But unlike my elders, it wasn't about "oh yay we defeated the Russians" it was more like "oh wow those people are free from oppression" (yes I already thought that way as a child, though not in those exact words, it was just more like an emotional feeling).

    It majorly affected me because it gave me hope and made me fascinated with a culture very different than my own. I don't think I fully understood the Cold War until I was an adult, seriously. I didn't even begin to have a grasp at all until I was in high school.

    This makes a huge fucking difference in development, experience, and world view.

  6. #76
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Enneagram
    827 sp/so
    Posts
    20,122

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    I lived in a small world as a kid. My eyes did not open until middle school, which was exactly the time that 9/11 occurred (even though the day was suppose to go by as I watched my cartoons.) Since I went to a year round school where I was off in September, I got to see first hand on T.V. everything that happened from early morning PST to late at night when I heard helicopters buzzing over the neighborhood. The repeated images of the planes crashing into the WTC, people jumping off of the WTC, a few people being at the top of the WTC waiting for a helicopter, both buildings collapsing, people running from the collapse, the hundreds of missing photos plastered all over the walls and people crying for their love ones, the death count rising by the day as NYC was filled with smoke.

    On the same note, I would think that the people in elementary school at the time would have a more diluted sense of what was going on (even the 5th and 6th graders.) Some people having school ending early without much of knowing why. Some being shielded from what happened until later. I didn't know much of the world until that day happened, not even about how they had a government shutdown in the 90's.

    In some ways, it can happen. Heck, what is even funny was how my siblings would tell me I should get my act together before I went to middle school as they were literally telling me that elementary school was different from middle school.
    On the other hand my political awareness and awareness of the world in general came about with the Oklahoma City bombing, Monica Lewinsky and school shootings... By the time September 11th happened I was very aware of the world and all of the stupid and horrible shit that happens in it and had actually done a speech on the treatment of women under Taliban control a few years before... it wasn't nearly as defining for me as it was for the people who it happened earlier in life for
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  7. #77
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    On the same note, I would think that the people in elementary school at the time would have a more diluted sense of what was going on (even the 5th and 6th graders.) Some people having school ending early without much of knowing why. Some being shielded from what happened until later. I didn't know much of the world until that day happened, not even about how they had a government shutdown in the 90's.
    Yes, two of my kids were just 6 and 5 at the time.

    They remember, but it's all kind of vague and they had no context for it. We did talk to them about it that day, but they were too young to grasp a lot of the context or exactly what happened, especially because it was nowhere nearby.

    Quote Originally Posted by Speed Gavoche
    Xs were also between 9 and 30 with Soviet Union collapsed, and many resent that as a end of global ideals, this is in part why they are called "generation without ideal",
    That's a weird comment to make. I never heard any of my peers at college say that (which is where I was when the wall fell), we all seemed happy and kind of surprised by it... I think I remember guys running up and down the halls whooping in joy, and other people standing around kind of pleasantly stunned... and my lack of ideal occurred more because of how I grew up rather than because of something that happened after my identity had its foundation laid. Generation differences seem to occur more because of the environment one is raised in, because there is not a lot of processing yet in place to filter it all; adults already have a framework by which to filter and arrange data.

    There were other events for us, like the gas embargo, Reagan getting shot, MTV starting / British invasion, the space shuttle blowing up...
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  8. #78

    Default

    I've been politically aware all my life, our family has always been that way, we're roman catholics and socialists, with histories of involvement in politics, trade unions and other organisations, the eighties were harrowing and most of family arent formally involved with anything actually labelled "socialist" anymore because pretty much when socialism committed suicide it became no longer what it had been even one or two generations before (the people who had either fought the nazis or remembered vividly other family members doing so) and was now just a magnet for vicious types and bullies. There's no way, if you believe that maxim that you should be the change you wish to see in the world, that I'd want the world to resemble any of the marxoid mini-groups or the sort of people in them.

    My dad always surprises me with the occasional outburst of real democratic sentiments, either to do with the church or schools or politics, he'll complain that a listening exercise is phony or people have been hand picked to provide the feedback that's wanted or that power is never devolved or simply given away.

  9. #79
    Certified Sausage Smoker Elfboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Socionics
    SLI None
    Posts
    9,635

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I've been politically aware all my life, our family has always been that way, we're roman catholics and socialists, with histories of involvement in politics, trade unions and other organisations, the eighties were harrowing and most of family arent formally involved with anything actually labelled "socialist" anymore because pretty much when socialism committed suicide it became no longer what it had been even one or two generations before (the people who had either fought the nazis or remembered vividly other family members doing so) and was now just a magnet for vicious types and bullies. There's no way, if you believe that maxim that you should be the change you wish to see in the world, that I'd want the world to resemble any of the marxoid mini-groups or the sort of people in them.

    My dad always surprises me with the occasional outburst of real democratic sentiments, either to do with the church or schools or politics, he'll complain that a listening exercise is phony or people have been hand picked to provide the feedback that's wanted or that power is never devolved or simply given away.
    an ENTJ socialist? that's not something you see every day
    ENFP: We put the Fi in Fire
    ENFP
    5w4>1w9>2w1 Sx/Sp
    SEE-Fi
    Papa Bear
    Motivation: Dark Worker
    Alignment: Chaotic Neutral
    Chibi Seme
    MTG Color: black/red
    Male Archtype: King/Lover
    Sunburst!
    "You are a gay version of Gambit" Speed Gavroche
    "I wish that I could be affected by any hate, but I can't, cuz I just get affected by the bank" Chamillionaire

  10. #80

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elfboy View Post
    an ENTJ socialist? that's not something you see every day
    This is something I dont understand.

Similar Threads

  1. [ENTP] ENTPs and the novelty value of people
    By EcK in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 12-16-2009, 04:28 PM
  2. The value of random on-line personality tests
    By Ilah in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-26-2008, 08:33 PM
  3. Extraverted Value of Introverted Functions
    By ygolo in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-10-2008, 09:23 AM
  4. Value of Schooling
    By ygolo in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-26-2008, 08:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO