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  1. #61
    Whisky Old & Women Young Speed Gavroche's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_World_As_Will View Post
    @ Speed- I ran across that before, GREAT post! did you take it from the book the fourth turning by William Strauss? Just wondering, they argued similarly, if not, the exact same thing, perhaps the information is the same?. either-way, great post.
    Thank you. Yes, it's in strong part form William Strauss theory. I did'nt read the book, just read the article on wikipedia:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generations_(book)
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  2. #62
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    The more I think about this, the more I think you're comparing the oldest members of X to the youngest members of Y.

    Your theory, Speed, works best when applied to Gen X-ers who were at least 16 or 18 when the Soviet Union collapsed, and even better for those in their twenties and thirties. Those of us who were still basically children are more like Gen Y in our mentality about globalization because we were basically born on the cusp, anyway.

    And I mean, your older members of Gen Y share traits with Gen X. Those of us born last wave X or first wave Y don't quite fit the theory as well.

    We're in-betweeners.

  3. #63
    Whisky Old & Women Young Speed Gavroche's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    The more I think about this, the more I think you're comparing the oldest members of X to the youngest members of Y.
    I don't think so. But it is possible though that since the middle year of Ge X is 1971 and the middle year of Gen Y is 1991, I think more about people born between 1966 and 1976 for X, and people born between 1986 and 1996 for Ys.

    Those of us who were still basically children are more like Gen Y in our mentality about globalization because we were basically born on the cusp, anyway.

    Yes, I think you are "more like", but of course, not "exactly like". Fifth wave X and First wave Y (1977-1985) are "in between" as you say. Elsewhere, many things who are the norm for early Y are not for late X. For example, the most part of early Ys testify that they had a cell phone and an internet conection when they were in high school, most part of late X testify that they did'nt. It seems to me also that a late X who cared about ecology or computers during his teens was almost an alien, an early Y who did the same thing as the same period of his life was normal.

    Basically, Ys are called "millenial" or "child of the millenium", they are thoses who were born in 2000, or younger than 18 on the eve of 2000. If you were older than 18 the 31th december 1999 at 23:59, you are a X, not Y. And you can't be "in-between" that.
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  4. #64
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    Those are arbitrary numbers, and my very educated INTP friend with a PhD confirms this about the "generations." They are some numbers somebody picked and made a theory about. SO. Yes, there is some generalized accuracy ...but the things you say about the divided West/East and ideologies applies much more strongly to people who were at the very least in high school, and more likely in college or full grown adults when the Soviet Union collapsed (unless those younger X-er's were actually living in the Soviet Union, then naturally they are more directly affected by it).

    I have commented before how much the collapse of the Soviet Union affected me, but it's because it's pretty much my earliest memory of knowing about the greater world. One of the first things I remember outside of my family, town, school, and nation was hearing about Russia, the Gorbechev-Regan peace talks, et al. But for me being a child, this was exciting because it seemed like the beginning of a "new world" and a better world. I never had the prejudices of people slightly or much older than I. To me, Russia was an interesting place and I wanted to meet those people, I never feared them or had any concept of an ideology at that age. All I knew is that I wanted people to get along and be free and not have to stand in line to buy bread on their side, or fear nuclear bombs on both sides. I didn't understand socialism or capitalism really at all until I was several years older. Ideology played no part in it for those of us who were children. I didn't really comprehend what the Cold War even was .

    Yes, I absolutely feel a kinship with people born between 1977 and 1985, that makes incredible sense to me. But according to theory it overlaps between the two generations, but we seem almost like we're a sub-set of our own, in a way. Any of us whose earliest memories are the 1980's share a certain similar experience, and that applies to those of us born either in the late 70's or early 80's.

    P.S. I just got the greatest idea for a novel because of this thread, so I want to thank you indirectly, Speed. Seriously.

  5. #65
    Senior Member ceecee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfboy View Post
    1) Relatability: being able to relate to everyone is a bad thing. it's a sign you are either conformist, people pleasing or common.
    2) Agreability: anyone who is afraid to disagree is a coward with no personality
    3) Equality: not everything is equal. that's logically impossible and naive of anyone to trully believe
    4) self sacrifice: a culture of self sacrifice leads to a wellfare state because everyone refuses to actually be successful or happy. this leaves you with a society or poor people who are ashamed on themselves and feel the need to give away all their economic value to justify their existance
    5) soft spokenness: believe it or not, not everyone who speaks confidently and with proper projection is yelling at you.
    6) false humility: ugh, come on people have some backbone
    You bitch a lot.
    I like to rock n' roll all night and *part* of every day. I usually have errands... I can only rock from like 1-3.

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by ceecee View Post
    You bitch a lot.
    I want to be part of Generation Ceecee


  7. #67
    Whisky Old & Women Young Speed Gavroche's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    P.S. I just got the greatest idea for a novel because of this thread, so I want to thank you indirectly, Speed. Seriously.

    Interesting. (: By the way, the strong point of your post, is that you considered the post Berlin Wall world as a new world, but fot Ys, it was not a new world, it was alway like this.
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    "Stereotypes about personality and gender turn out to be fairly accurate: ... On the binary Myers-Briggs measure, the thinking-feeling breakdown is about 30/70 for women versus 60/40 for men." ~ Bryan Caplan

  8. #68
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speed Gavroche View Post
    Interesting. (: By the way, the strong point of your post, is that you considered the post Berlin Wall world as a new world, but for Ys, it was not a new world, it was always like this.
    Generally speaking, there is no way that I can remember anything when I was not even close to 7 months old. Maybe the oldest Millennials could remember some glimpse of it during their childhood (by then, people around 5-7 year old do start remembering some things.) So pretty much, the world was always like this. It isn't until something like 9/11 happened that something could eventually be said that it happened around my time. And that, for me, was the "new" world.

    There can be a case made that the older generations of the Millennials do share a bit with the youngest GenX.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speed Gavroche View Post
    Interesting. (: By the way, the strong point of your post, is that you considered the post Berlin Wall world as a new world, but fot Ys, it was not a new world, it was alway like this.
    There's a big difference about how someone born in 1982 or 1984 perceives it, though, and how someone born in 1990 or 2000 perceives it. Someone born in '82 remembers it as it was actually happening (IF THEIR PARENTS WATCHED THE NEWS ETC.), just like I remember the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    This is what I mean by I think you're comparing oldest members of X to youngest members of Y.

    I hardly feel anything in common at all with a Gen X'er born in the 1960's. My experience of basically having the unification of East/West be part of my formative experience is much different than it was for someone who was old enough to really understand what was going on, or have a real opinion about it.

    I've talked with later X, early Y about these things, early Y's like a lot of the same music that I do, and some say they feel more like they are Gen X. I'm also more "plugged in" and open to new society and technology than some older Gen X-ers, even those who are only older by a few years.

  10. #70
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    somehow I feel a lot more in common with people who are a few years older than me than with kids born in the late 80s or early 90s (I was born in 1983... in the sticks)... family and home based values interest me less than they apparently should I guess

    and everyone has thier own personal values, so judging based on when we're born as far as our personally held values is getting towards the sensibility of judging us on our personalities based on when we're born (aka the zodiac) :rolli:
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

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