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  1. #121
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    I disagree. Much of this centers on a particular class distinction, and does not apply to the generation as a whole.

    Usually, middle and upper-middle class Gen Y kids are called "entitled." It just seems that way because we've been promised a whole lot of things, and as we hit adulthood, we're finding that those promises were overstated at best, and actively being broken at worst. When we protest the seeming bait-and-switch, we're told that we have a sense of "entitlement."

    Another part of this comes from the myth that "everyone is middle class in the United States." That, of course, couldn't be further from the truth. People in the working class will naturally see those in the middle and upper-middle classes as entitled, because they believe that they're of equal social status.

    There's been a radical redefinition of the word "entitlement" since the 1980s, mostly for political purposes. Before, it meant a sense that one deserved the material surplus he enjoyed by benefit of his high status. Entitlement came at the expense of another. An executive who lost a particular parking space in a lot realignment and complained would be expressing a sense of entitlement, particularly if the rearrangement led to general parking.

    Today, many have turned the definition on its head. This started with the reframing of the social safety net as "entitlement spending." Now, "a sense of entitlement" means believing that someone, usually of higher status or greater power, owes you the benefit of an obligation. The biggest of these would be the modern "American Dream" - if you work hard and go to college, you'll have a comfortable existence, and that you should do the kind of work that you love. Then, once we graduate, we find that no one is willing to pay a comfortable wage for the sort of work that each person loves, except for a favored elite. So, when many of us protest this, and ask to see the benefit of the bargain, we're called "entitled".
    I actually think that "entitlement" boundary lines can be applied to the lower class too. Partly because of what our elders would tell most of us (so both upper middle-middle-lower class.) From family, to teachers, it was to work hard in school, work hard in college, get a good degree so that "you wouldn't have to go through what we have gone through." Stay out of trouble, make something of yourself, and you will get through it. The fact of the matter is that many of the things that were taken for granted back then has lost their value. We've been told many things. Yet, we've gotten nothing for working so hard. It takes so much more to pay for such things as gas and tuition than it did 30 years ago and it takes just as much paying for a home by oneself today than it did 30 years ago.

    What's funny was when I was at a rally to protest even more cuts to the college funding, this guy in his 30's or 40's blatantly asked me how are we going to pay for the debt. I told him (along with my classmates) cutting funding for education, even in college, is the wrong way to go about it. Funding for education is an investment, and many see more returns than if they didn't invest in education at all. I not only told him that, I've also told him with the amount of teachers being fired and classes being offered dwindling, me, you, him, her, everyone in college will spend an even longer time in college. Now don't even tell me to work two jobs when many of you people who lost your jobs are taking up our space. If you are going to complain about cutting what we've worked hard to get through, don't you dare go into college with me and say that I have this "sense of entitlement."

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    All the issues that accumulated ain't my fault and it shouldn't be treated as my constituent's fault either. The debt that accumulated until 2008 ain't our fault, the recession ain't our fault. You old people chose to drive the debt insane and create a recession. You are the one that caused the dot-com bubble, you are the ones to create the housing crash, you are the one that created the recession. Now you say that we are entitled when you old people were living the life worrying about the little things like abortions and your religious intolerance.

  2. #122
    Senior Member knight's Avatar
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    I guess someone who has already moved pass being a student, and secured their place would not care about college funding getting cut, this is very common(i got mine fu*K you all bitches, though they have taken out of the pot). to me it does not make sense either, we are starting to need more skilled workers and though there is more then enough workers they are not as skilled to fill the positions. I guess an alternate cost effective solution would be to outsource and make the cuts anyway.

    Id look at who is behind the wheel making the choices, most everyone feels strongly that it is wrong to make these cuts

    this is not a generation thingy, that man was short sighted, im sure your gen has short sighted people that cant think for themselves but follow the people they subjectively deem intelligent and regurgitate stupid crap or short sighted views themselves. we suffer them together, look at that Im relating

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Yes probably around '92 or '93. Would anyone born after '94 even remember 9/11? I mean if we're using political events as the measuring stick.
    I know this post is really old, but I just ran across this thread & was skimming through. I just wanted to say that yes, I was born in '95, & I remember 9/11. I remember it pretty vividly, actually. I was in first grade at the time, & my teacher brought in a TV to watch the news after the first plane hit. When she first turned it on the news anchor was talking about it being an accident. I literally watched the second plane go in to the other building on there, behind the newscaster. That's when they were basically like, well this is obviously an attack. I remember a lot of the news stories that followed, too. Even though I was young, I definitely understood what was going on.

  4. #124
    Theta Male Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DreamBeliever View Post
    I know this post is really old, but I just ran across this thread & was skimming through. I just wanted to say that yes, I was born in '95, & I remember 9/11. I remember it pretty vividly, actually. I was in first grade at the time, & my teacher brought in a TV to watch the news after the first plane hit. When she first turned it on the news anchor was talking about it being an accident. I literally watched the second plane go in to the other building on there, behind the newscaster. That's when they were basically like, well this is obviously an attack. I remember a lot of the news stories that followed, too. Even though I was young, I definitely understood what was going on.
    I was a sophomore in high school when I heard about the attack. I was home sick that that day. My mom or my sister said something to me about planes hitting the World Trade Center.

    My thoughts were along the lines of "Oh, this is kind of a big deal, and I'm probably going to always remember this." It's not a response the McCoys of the world would approve of. I still think it's important to keep a cool head in those kinds of situations.
    [Trump's] rhetoric is not an abuse of power. In the same way that it's also not against the law to do a backflip off of the roof of your house onto your concrete driveway. It's just mind-numbingly stupid and, to say the least, counterproductive. - Bush did 9-11


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  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by DreamBeliever View Post
    I know this post is really old, but I just ran across this thread & was skimming through. I just wanted to say that yes, I was born in '95, & I remember 9/11. I remember it pretty vividly, actually. I was in first grade at the time, & my teacher brought in a TV to watch the news after the first plane hit. When she first turned it on the news anchor was talking about it being an accident. I literally watched the second plane go in to the other building on there, behind the newscaster. That's when they were basically like, well this is obviously an attack. I remember a lot of the news stories that followed, too. Even though I was young, I definitely understood what was going on.
    Ok. Cool. My nephew is most likely Gen Z but he seems Gen Y. Played outside, no heavy technology besides video games til his early teens, because he lived with his grandparents in West Virginia, and he has a lot of the concerns of Gen Y...I was surprised to find my 18 year old nephew not to just be so articulate and smart, but to be so involved in the politics of my own generation, like he's against ageism, sexism...he's so free of anything prejuduced or superficial...but the fact that he cares makes him so much more Gen Y than Gen Z....either than or he's the male version of Lorde.

    I'm the opposite. I could have gone towards Gen X, I have friends who did, I find them kind of old fashioned throw backs. ..I went towards Gen Y, despite my old fashioned upbringing, my grandfather wanted every electronic convenience at my disposal, pushed me into advanced classes, over protected me from the world, which I strongly resisted. I had a very strong minded TJ grandfather who pushed me as hard as he could towards pretty much everything Gen Y represents, from science, electronics, success, achievement...I figured out much later I was his self rescuing project. ..because my mother and uncle had run so wild and free through the green grass in the 60s'70s, especially when my grandfather still drank in the 60s.


    It really depends on who raised you and what their mindset was. My mother's mindset, for example, was much more feminist and collegiate when she raised my nephew than she was when she raised his mother...I was actually probably raised more similarly by my own grandfather, later in life...so there's a potential that my nephew and I are more Gen Y and my sister is more Gen X, if that makes any sense at all, it wouldn't in a traditional family.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfboy View Post
    1) Relatability: being able to relate to everyone is a bad thing. it's a sign you are either conformist, people pleasing or common.
    2) Agreability: anyone who is afraid to disagree is a coward with no personality
    3) Equality: not everything is equal. that's logically impossible and naive of anyone to trully believe
    4) self sacrifice: a culture of self sacrifice leads to a wellfare state because everyone refuses to actually be successful or happy. this leaves you with a society or poor people who are ashamed on themselves and feel the need to give away all their economic value to justify their existance
    5) soft spokenness: believe it or not, not everyone who speaks confidently and with proper projection is yelling at you.
    6) false humility: ugh, come on people have some backbone
    Excellent post, it distills much of what is wrong, philosophically, with this generation. I feel embarrassed to have been born among such idiots.

    There is nothing we need more right now than some testicular fortitude. The West is run by a cabal of old ladies.

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    Ok. Cool. My nephew is most likely Gen Z but he seems Gen Y. Played outside, no heavy technology besides video games til his early teens, because he lived with his grandparents in West Virginia, and he has a lot of the concerns of Gen Y...I was surprised to find my 18 year old nephew not to just be so articulate and smart, but to be so involved in the politics of my own generation, like he's against ageism, sexism...he's so free of anything prejuduced or superficial...but the fact that he cares makes him so much more Gen Y than Gen Z....either than or he's the male version of Lorde.
    Marm, I liked you better when you were still conservative.

    Being free of prejudice has become so superficial and unoriginal that I feel like farting it over the Pacific just to make a point

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmotini View Post
    It really depends on who raised you and what their mindset was. My mother's mindset, for example, was much more feminist and collegiate when she raised my nephew than she was when she raised his mother...I was actually probably raised more similarly by my own grandfather, later in life...so there's a potential that my nephew and I are more Gen Y and my sister is more Gen X, if that makes any sense at all, it wouldn't in a traditional family.
    I wasn't raised, I grew; and that is the difference. I don't identify my values with those of a generation, because I supervene them. I exist outside the contemptuous neuroses of Generation Y. If there is one indictment I could level at my generation it would be poor self-awareness; we don't say what we want because...we actually don't even know what we want. To be fair, this isn't totally our fault.

  8. #128
    Dope& diamonds. Dyslexxie's Avatar
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    There are many issues with our generation but I don't really see how any of those values outlined could be considered as such (especially because I don't think in practice they're displayed how OP has outlined them).
    Yeah we're a bunch of entitled wimps but we're also one of the most progressive generations this far and we do fight for causes when the fight is necessary. Plus we're pretty laissez faire as a group, which is nice because we're all allowed to be our own special kind of snowflake and really, what's the issue with that as long as it's not harming anyone else? Just ignore us and move along if it bothers you.
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  9. #129
    Spoiled Brat 🍒 Masokissed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfboy View Post
    Quoting from 2011, but those are more like values pushed onto Gen Y and Z by their schools than they are actual values of ours. A lot of that makes no sense either. Of course not everyone is equal, but everyone does deserve an equal chance; anyone who's afraid to agree with anything at all is a douche with too much of an ego; number 4 is so not true. You could be right on 6, but where does 5 even come from?
    I want my cake and I wanna eat it too
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  10. #130
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    Every generation has a problem with the generation that comes after it. The baby boomers hate Gen X, Gen X hates Gen Y, and I'm sure Gen Y will hate Gen Z. Things change and life moves on. Who cares?
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