User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 82

  1. #31
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6
    Posts
    24,060

    Default

    Some posts above moved to a thread for haterz.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  2. #32
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    7,233

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Honestly, it's just a color. If a color is breaking your heart I think you might need to toughen up a bit.

    When I became a mother I was steadfast that I was NOT going to impose gender stereotypes on my child. I chose greens and yellows over pinks and blues, and we offered her a wide variety of both gender-neutral and specifically "girl" OR "boy" toys. We avoided commercialized or demeaning stuff like Barbie and so forth. For Christmas when she was 2 we got her a giant Tonka truck and a set of natural wood blocks to haul in it. Another relative gave her a Barbie, her first, and it was like watching people fall in love. The Tonka truck became a Barbie transportation device. The wooden blocks made homes for Barbie and her friends. Every girly gift she was given-- tutus, fairy costumes, commercialized princess gear-- was latched onto like it was water in the desert. We ended up having the girliest of girls, despite our attempts to raise her neutrally.

    IMO giving little girls dolls and pink and frilly crap is only bad if parents REFUSE to also give them access to the other stuff IF THEY WANT IT. My daughter takes martial arts and basketball and enjoys it all but at her heart she's a girly girl, and I've just had to learn to live with that. I could have forbidden Barbie and gotten rid of the gifts, but what purpose would that serve but to set up an adversarial relationship with a little girl who clearly loved that kind of stuff? (She knows we won't buy Barbie stuff and she knows how I feel about it.)
    Hm. If she loves Barbie, and you want her to be free from stereotypes (or free to choose which stereotypes to live by, I'm guessing) have you thought about getting accessories that show that Barbie can be well-rounded and even masculine? Do they have accessories like that, e.g., accountant-Barbie with her mini-pencil, calculator, and visor?

  3. #33
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6
    Posts
    24,060

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatHeSaid View Post
    Hm. If she loves Barbie, and you want her to be free from stereotypes (or free to choose which stereotypes to live by, I'm guessing) have you thought about getting accessories that show that Barbie can be well-rounded and even masculine? Do they have accessories like that, e.g., accountant-Barbie with her mini-pencil, calculator, and visor?
    Man, Barbie has had every job known to (wo)man! She has been an astronaut, a vet, even the president. If I were hiring Barbie I would want to know why she has changed jobs so much.

    Actually I'm not sure you were being serious but I have been pleased to see my daughter doing that kind of active pretend with Barbie more than the "which boy likes me?" passive crap I hate. I've found that the underlying messages you give to children are MUCH more important than the superficial stuff like pink/blue and Barbie-must-die.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  4. #34
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    INFj None
    Posts
    9,827

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Honestly, it's just a color. If a color is breaking your heart I think you might need to toughen up a bit.

    When I became a mother I was steadfast that I was NOT going to impose gender stereotypes on my child. I chose greens and yellows over pinks and blues, and we offered her a wide variety of both gender-neutral and specifically "girl" OR "boy" toys. We avoided commercialized or demeaning stuff like Barbie and so forth. For Christmas when she was 2 we got her a giant Tonka truck and a set of natural wood blocks to haul in it. Another relative gave her a Barbie, her first, and it was like watching people fall in love. The Tonka truck became a Barbie transportation device. The wooden blocks made homes for Barbie and her friends. Every girly gift she was given-- tutus, fairy costumes, commercialized princess gear-- was latched onto like it was water in the desert. We ended up having the girliest of girls, despite our attempts to raise her neutrally.

    IMO giving little girls dolls and pink and frilly crap is only bad if parents REFUSE to also give them access to the other stuff IF THEY WANT IT. My daughter takes martial arts and basketball and enjoys it all but at her heart she's a girly girl, and I've just had to learn to live with that. I could have forbidden Barbie and gotten rid of the gifts, but what purpose would that serve but to set up an adversarial relationship with a little girl who clearly loved that kind of stuff? (She knows we won't buy Barbie stuff and she knows how I feel about it.)
    That all sounds so familiar. Even my NT daughter liked dolls better than the trucks, etc we bought her and pink was her favorite color for some time. She will still wear it if it's annoyingly bright enough.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  5. #35
    Highly Hollow Wandering's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Posts
    873

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    We ended up having the girliest of girls, despite our attempts to raise her neutrally.
    For some reason, I don't have any doubt that this is what will happen to me too if I ever have a little girl

    IMO giving little girls dolls and pink and frilly crap is only bad if parents REFUSE to also give them access to the other stuff IF THEY WANT IT.
    I know! I agree with you, that's what makes all this Pink Flood even worse : knowing that the girls, or at least 95% of them, actually enjoy it and want it that way

    *shudder*

  6. #36
    Procrastinating
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    954

    Default

    For some reason it just seems "natural" for little girls to gravitate to pink or purple.

  7. #37

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wandering View Post
    I know! I agree with you, that's what makes all this Pink Flood even worse : knowing that the girls, or at least 95% of them, actually enjoy it and want it that way

    *shudder*
    But if the girls have other options, why is it worthy of a shudder that they choose the pink because they like it? If they actively choose it, doesn't that negate the (dubious) taint of gender pigeonholing? I can't imagine anyone getting up in arms because boys like blue.
    Everybody have fun tonight. Everybody Wang Chung tonight.

    Johari
    /Nohari

  8. #38
    Member MX5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    83

    Default

    I don't have undeniable references to back this up, but I seem to remember a TV program refering to this subject where it was stated that once (late 19th centure, early 20th?) pink was considered to be a boys color. Pink, because it was a milder version of red, which was considered to be emminently masculine, the mildness reflected the youth of the infant. The assignation of pink to girls is a 20th century concept. (or so I remember)
    MBC - writing bad poetry, kickin' ass.

  9. #39
    Procrastinating
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FMWarner View Post
    But if the girls have other options, why is it worthy of a shudder that they choose the pink because they like it? If they actively choose it, doesn't that negate the (dubious) taint of gender pigeonholing? I can't imagine anyone getting up in arms because boys like blue.
    The answers can get quite esoteric. As an artist, color and its affects have been a life-long interest/study.... in the INTP sort of way but others as well. Yes, there are reasons for "natural" selections. When color is understood (deeply).. even to the point of realizing it doesn't actually exist... the affects it has on us is understood. Yes, people are born gravitating to specific ones... that is not "pigeon-holing" which involves value judgements.

  10. #40
    Procrastinating
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MX5 View Post
    I don't have undeniable references to back this up, but I seem to remember a TV program refering to this subject where it was stated that once (late 19th centure, early 20th?) pink was considered to be a boys color. Pink, because it was a milder version of red, which was considered to be emminently masculine, the mildness reflected the youth of the infant. The assignation of pink to girls is a 20th century concept. (or so I remember)
    True... sounds like an intersting show.. wish I had caught it.

Similar Threads

  1. When did the term alt-right get expanded to encompass anyone not on the far left?
    By asynartetic in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 99
    Last Post: 10-09-2017, 08:54 PM
  2. Greek islanders on the frontline of refugee crisis are to be nominated for Nobel P.P.
    By Olm the Water King in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-25-2016, 11:10 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-01-2013, 10:40 PM
  4. [MBTItm] If you get to be a RATIONAL(NT) which type would you choose to be?
    By Riva in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 99
    Last Post: 12-23-2008, 11:46 AM
  5. Olives: the main reason I'm glad to be of Mediterranean decent
    By murkrow in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 07-25-2008, 10:33 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO