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View Poll Results: How do you feel about dogs?

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  • I don't like dogs.

    16 14.81%
  • I can tolerate dogs.

    22 20.37%
  • I like dogs.

    70 64.81%
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Results 181 to 188 of 188

  1. #181
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyyukon View Post
    Actually I feel a lot of memes portray cats as somewhat evil. This isn't a meme, but hey, funny and true:




    Cats are born killers/hunters. "you can take the cat outta the jungle...."
    Portrayed as more evil than dogs, methinks.

  2. #182
    Male johnnyyukon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
    Portrayed as more evil than dogs, methinks.
    Ha, well yeah. youthinks gud.
    I've had this ice cream bar, since I was a child!

    Each thought's completely warped
    I'm like a walkin', talkin', ouija board.

  3. #183
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I love dogs but I prefer cats. I grew up with cats but never had a dog until I was an adult with a kid of my own.

  4. #184
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    I want a Labrador Retriever or something similar. My household currently has a tiny dog that we play with and kids seem to enjoy her.

    I love that however horrible your days are, they will always be there for you.

    The barking can get annoying sometimes, but hey, the barking is like an alarm.

  5. #185
    Member Agnes's Avatar
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    I don't like dogs and the fact that some people think that you are horrible person because of it is stupid. I don't hate dogs, but I don't like them. Sure, some can be cute and all, but i cannot bare the way they depend on me I'm not always in the mood to play with them or something. And I have my life to live, I cannot bring a dog with me all the time; but if you leave them alone they will cry for you and how could I torture an animal like that?? For me they are like the kids you have to take care of all their life. It is too much of a burden and responsibility for me and the compensation of joy they bring is not enough. I prefer cats, they take care of themselves and do love you (I have them so I know).

  6. #186
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Kangaroos hate dogs and lure them into the water, put their paws on top of them, and drown them. And then the kangaroo waddles back up to the shore, proud of themself for a job well done.

  7. #187
    Male johnnyyukon's Avatar
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    Not when seasoned wrong.
    Last edited by johnnyyukon; 05-23-2014 at 12:53 PM.
    I've had this ice cream bar, since I was a child!

    Each thought's completely warped
    I'm like a walkin', talkin', ouija board.

  8. #188
    Symbolic Herald Vasilisa's Avatar
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    Default Studying play, studying ourselves

    In dogs’ play, researchers see honesty and deceit, perhaps something like morality
    By David Grimm
    May 19, 2014
    The Washington Post | Washington Post: Breaking News, World, US, DC News & Analysis

    Excerpt:
    A shaggy brown terrier approaches a large chocolate Labrador in a city park. When the terrier gets close, he adopts a yogalike pose, crouching on his forepaws and hiking his butt into the air. The Lab gives an excited bark, and soon the two dogs are somersaulting and tugging on each other’s ears. Then the terrier takes off and the Lab gives chase, his tail wagging wildly. When the two meet once more, the whole thing begins again.

    Watch a couple of dogs play, and you’ll probably see seemingly random gestures, lots of frenetic activity and a whole lot of energy being expended. But decades of research suggest that beneath this apparently frivolous fun lies a hidden language of honesty and deceit, empathy and perhaps even a humanlike morality.


    Take those two dogs. That yogalike pose is known as a “play bow,” and in the language of play it’s one of the most commonly used words. It’s an instigation and a clarification, a warning and an apology. Dogs often adopt this stance as an invitation to play right before they lunge at another dog; they also bow before they nip (“I’m going to bite you, but I’m just fooling around”) or after some particularly aggressive roughhousing (“Sorry I knocked you over; I didn’t mean it.”).

    All of this suggests that dogs have a kind of moral code — one long hidden to humans until a cognitive ethologist named Marc Bekoff began to crack it.

    A wiry 68-year-old with reddish-gray hair tied back in a long ponytail, Bekoff is a professor emeritus at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he taught for 32 years. He began studying animal behavior in the early 1970s, spending four years videotaping groups of dogs, wolves and coyotes in large enclosures and slowly playing back the tapes, jotting down every nip, yip and lick. “Twenty minutes of film could take a week to analyze,” he says.

    The data revealed insights into how the animals maintained their tight social bonds — by grooming each other, for example. But what changed Bekoff’s life was watching them play. The wolves would chase each other, run, jump and roll over for seemingly no other reason than to have fun.

    Few people had studied animal play, but Bekoff was intrigued. “Play is a major expenditure of energy, and it can be dangerous,” he says. “You can twist a shoulder or break a leg, and it can increase your chances of being preyed upon. So why do they do it? It has to feel good.”

    Suddenly, Bekoff wasn’t interested just in behavior; he was interested also in emotions and, fundamentally, what was going on inside these animals’ heads.

    Darwin’s dogs

    Bekoff wasn’t the first scientist to become intrigued by the canine mind. Charles Darwin in the mid-1800s had postulated that canines were capable of abstract thought, morality and even language. (Darwin was inspired by his own mutts; he owned 13 of them during his life.) Dogs, he wrote, understand human words and respond with barks of eagerness, joy and despair. If that wasn’t communication between the species, what was?

    Two of Darwin’s contemporaries had suggested that dogs could even sniff out someone’s social status and read words. But by the time Bekoff turned his attention to canines, scientists had long deemed them unworthy of study. Because they no longer lived in their natural environment, the thinking went, their minds were corrupted and could not shed light on the bigger question, the evolution of human intelligence. The only animals worth studying were wild ones.

    But when Bekoff began looking at videos of dogs romping in super slow motion, he began to realize that there was more going on in the canine mind than science had acknowledged. He noticed the “play bow,” for example.

    What’s more, he found that canines “role-reverse” or “self-handicap” during play. When a big dog played with a smaller one, for example, the big dog often rolled on her back to give the smaller dog an advantage, and she allowed the other dog to jump on her far more often than she jumped on him.

    Bekoff also spotted a number of other blink-and-you’d-miss-them behaviors, such as a sudden shift in the eyes — a squint that can mean “you’re playing too rough” — and a particular wag of the tail that says, “I’m open to be approached.” Humping a playmate during a romp, meanwhile, was often an invitation to nearby dogs to come join the fun.

    Such signals are important during play; without them, a giddy tussle can quickly turn into a vicious fight.

    In the wild, coyotes ostracize pack members that don’t play by the rules. Something similar happens in dog parks: If three dogs are playing and one bites or tackles too hard, the other two are likely to give him the cold shoulder and stop playing with him, Bekoff says. Such behavior, he says, suggests that dogs are capable of morality, a mind-set once thought to be uniquely human.

    Even morality hints at something deeper, however. To enforce moral conduct, dogs must be able to experience a spectrum of emotions, from joy to indignation, guilt to jealousy. They must also be able to read these emotions in others, distinguishing accident from intent, honesty from deceit. And indeed, recent studies by other scientists have shown evidence of these abilities (confirming what many dog owners already feel about their pets).

    Scientists have found, for example, that dogs trained to shake hands with humans will stop shaking if they notice that they aren’t being rewarded for the trick although a nearby dog is — a sign, the researchers suggested, that dogs can sense inequity.

    Other studies have revealed that dogs yawn when they see humans yawning and that they nuzzle and lick people who are crying; scientists consider both behaviors displays of empathy, a rarely documented trait in the animal kingdom.

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