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Thread: A God Complex

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    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    Default A God Complex

    A god complex is a non-clinical term generally used to describe an individual who consistently believes he or she can accomplish more than is humanly possible or that their opinion is automatically above those with whom he or she may disagree. The individual may believe he or she is above the rules of society and should be given special consideration or privileges. The term "god complex" does not appear in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).
    Do you think you can get that via a viral infection or is it destiny ?
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    I was born with it, so probably genetic.

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    A person would do well to know there own limits. I don't see how a "God complex" can last. They might get a bloody nose bumping into too many walls.

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    Viral infection.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigApplePi View Post
    I don't see how a "God complex" can last. They might get a bloody nose bumping into too many walls.
    Or from getting punched in the face too many times.
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    Hmm


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    Quote Originally Posted by BadOctopus View Post
    Or from getting punched in the face too many times.
    Honestly, this sounds incredibly common:

    A god complex is a non-clinical term generally used to describe an individual who consistently believes he or she can accomplish more than is humanly possible or that their opinion is automatically above those with whom he or she may disagree. The individual may believe he or she is above the rules of society and should be given special consideration or privileges.
    Lots of people assume that there are no limits, and that everything is possible. I think it's kind of the way people were raised.


    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty6226
    I think that most people have a God complex. When it comes down to it, I beleive that it is actually a bit healthy. When you are young, your parents-relatives-teachers-and others in authority, pretty much make up your 'God'. As you grow, you start shedding those 'Gods', and replacing them with your own impressions and opinions. On the whole, I would guess that most people would not enjoy aspect of their lives decided for them. And I suppose that if a person had no iota of a 'God complex', they would find it easy to defer on everything. Most people possibly do feel that they are a bit more important, a bit above the rules of society and man.
    It looks like you are echoing some of my thoughts here. It seems not uncommon for people to think that rules shouldn't apply to them, only to the other people. Here's the thing, though. There are all kinds of rules. Some are explicit, and some are implicit and not stated outright. There are a lot of people out there who object to the concept of explicit rules, but what usually happens is that they replace that with some kind of implicit rules. So long as these implicit rules are agreed upon by everyone, I suppose there is no problem. But, if everyone has different implicit rules, then we have a problem on our hands.

    I also consider it good courtesy to explain your implicit rules to a newcomer if asked, but often what people prefer to do in those social settings is to use the implicit rules as a gatekeeper, as a way of determining who is acceptable and who isn't. It seems wiser to me to give them the necessary information so that they have a chance to decide if they want to participate or not. I think a community can be strengthened by including many different types of people, and norms and rules can provide a framework for that.
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    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vulcan View Post
    It looks like you are echoing some of my thoughts here. It seems not uncommon for people to think that rules shouldn't apply to them, only to the other people. Here's the thing, though. There are all kinds of rules. Some are explicit, and some are implicit and not stated outright. There are a lot of people out there who object to the concept of explicit rules, but what usually happens is that they replace that with some kind of implicit rules. So long as these implicit rules are agreed upon by everyone, I suppose there is no problem. But, if everyone has different implicit rules, then we have a problem on our hands.

    I also consider it good courtesy to explain your implicit rules to a newcomer if asked, but often what people prefer to do in those social settings is to use the implicit rules as a gatekeeper, as a way of determining who is acceptable and who isn't. It seems wiser to me to give them the necessary information so that they have a chance to decide if they want to participate or not. I think a community can be strengthened by including many different types of people, and norms and rules can provide a framework for that.
    Right, you take what you are given, what is provided to you, every source, deconstruct it, and rework it into a sort of internal structure of guidelines. But since no one ever recieves the exact same combination of experience and expectations, as that would not be possible especially as with the furtherance of population, original guideline mixtures grow exponentially further from their starting point and naturally distill, change, and separate from each other. More people, more time, more differences.

    Anyways, I think at one point in one thread @uumlau referenced something having to do with managing internal close set expectations with external general bridging expectations. How for most people it is easier to treat everyone in accordance to their own personal and familiar, strong beliefs, but how oftentimes that leads to misunderstanding in the larger more diverse scope. People want to believe that their beliefs are correct, and deep down people do, otherwise no one would have any core definition.

    There, (I think I might have mentioned this before, probably, yeah), is also just the general impossibility of really for sure completely being able to actually BE another person. Sure you might gravitate towards them for their knowledge, but once you find a way to incorporate their specific knowledge into your larger understanding, tweak it here and there, you will begin to trust your larger more developed internal system over what you view as their flimsy misconnected hard to understand, detatched, ideology. It isn't that you conciously or totally think that you are/know better than someone... But you do.

    It isn't completely intentional, and it is something society has deemed innapropriate to broadcast, but it is healthy. It is generally healthy for you to think you are right. Not in the way that every single fact that you think you believe is correct, but that you know enough not to let thing challenge your 'godly' inner core. Outward composition maybe it can be pretended, poked, shifted, and prodded, but I don't know if it is possible for anyone to be forced to 'change' their inner core... Outward can soak into inwards and help it grow more interconnectedly. But a void and small one, just latching onto whatever is thrown at it and spitting it right back out, is unhealthy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BadOctopus View Post
    Or from getting punched in the face too many times.
    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty6226 View Post
    Hmm

    Quote Originally Posted by Vulcan View Post
    Honestly, this sounds incredibly common:



    Lots of people assume that there are no limits, and that everything is possible. I think it's kind of the way people were raised.




    It looks like you are echoing some of my thoughts here. It seems not uncommon for people to think that rules shouldn't apply to them, only to the other people. Here's the thing, though. There are all kinds of rules. Some are explicit, and some are implicit and not stated outright. There are a lot of people out there who object to the concept of explicit rules, but what usually happens is that they replace that with some kind of implicit rules. So long as these implicit rules are agreed upon by everyone, I suppose there is no problem. But, if everyone has different implicit rules, then we have a problem on our hands.

    I also consider it good courtesy to explain your implicit rules to a newcomer if asked, but often what people prefer to do in those social settings is to use the implicit rules as a gatekeeper, as a way of determining who is acceptable and who isn't. It seems wiser to me to give them the necessary information so that they have a chance to decide if they want to participate or not. I think a community can be strengthened by including many different types of people, and norms and rules can provide a framework for that.
    It actually IS in the DSM. It's called narcissistic personality disorder. The reason narcissists don't get punched in the face as often as one might think is that their coping mechanisms all revolve around maintaining their narcissistic outlook. That is to say, they become "very good at being narcissistic". They hide their obviously bad qualities, highlight their good ones, and skillfully maneuver others into taking the blame for their faults. They get away with it by being very charming and manipulative overall. Most such people don't even realize that they're doing it: they're just reacting to protect their ego.

    Frosty's point about expectations is on the money. Effectively, they've set up their inner expectations in line with protecting their ego, and their outer expectations to maintain a mask so that they can get away with their manipulations. The key to spotting such people is that they're charming, but a significant aspect of being charming and attractive is missing: they really don't understand other people - they have no "Theory of Mind", not even at the rudimentary level of projecting one's personal values onto others.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
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    I sort of see it as everyone is composed, as I said before, two two circles. The inner one, as uumlau clarified, representing the ego is much less permeable than the outer one, which serves as both a front and a sorter?/defense mechanism for the inner.

    This is often changing, readjusting, accomodating, and deciding what to accept in the outer world. It is the fingers feeling things out and shoving things in. Too powerful and it bullies the inner into accepting everything and accepting nothing, too weak and nothing new comes in and the ego hardens

    There is a need to constantly readjust balance. And for whatever reason, there are some who are less willing (maybe capable... Open?), to figuring out how to mainatain this balance. The latter above, narcisists, the former... Idk not a psychologist. Some sort of dependency disorder?

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