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View Poll Results: What is your LEAST favorite subject?

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  • English

    23 30.67%
  • History

    15 20.00%
  • Math

    31 41.33%
  • Science

    6 8.00%
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Results 41 to 50 of 68

  1. #41
    Senior Member wedekit's Avatar
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    I agree, most people wouldn't read such classic books unless someone made them do it. In a lot of cases you can read a book and completely miss the whole point of it. Authors don't write to just tell a story, there is usually some meaning they wished to convey to the reader (at least good authors have this aim). In classics you have to look back and learn the context of the book, which is what every good english teacher I had took the time to do. Reading Hamlet in High School was completely different than reading Hamlet in college. I have strong dislike for Shakespeare, but my college English teacher really changed my view. It was like I read a completely different story when she taught it. Don't get me started with all the lessons on Greek culture when we were reading the Orestia and Iliad! Brilliant.
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  2. #42
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen View Post
    -There is good and bad writing in terms of organization, support and elaboration, grammar/mechanics, and the like. This can be evaluated pretty fairly using a rubric, and I think that the best way to handle writing is by somehow incorporating two standards: 1. a standard of progress, where you compare a student's writing to only that student's previous writings, and 2. a decently objective standard where you look for specific levels of achievement in certain areas (support/elab, organization, grammar/mechanics, the presence of a thesis, etc etc etc). The ability to articulate a coherent argument is an important skill, and coherence really isn't THAT subjective. Trust me--there are lots of people, highly intelligent people even, who struggle with organization when writing down thoughts. And I think that it frequently doesn't matter how bright you are if you can't explain what you understand. That may not be a fair standard... but if you can't articulate what you know, your knowledge is only useful to you.
    How come then that two different Italian teachers had two completely opposite opinions on the matter of coherence of my writing? I have a lot of difficulty envisioning a completely objective standard of coherence in writing; I suppose part of my difficulty is due to my own bias and my own experience, who knows.

    -As an English teacher, I may be looking for specifics in the interpretation of literature that take historical context into account, but pretty much if you can EXPLAIN (coherently) the reason that you believe something, I'm satisfied with your interpretation.
    But why then should I waste my time giving a completely subjective interpretation (sorry for being too blunt here, it's just my personal opinion and take it as such)? Wouldn't I be better off learning subjects that are based on objective evidence and laws?

    -English teachers are not supposed to teach works; we're supposed to teach skills. In English III, I teach skills with American works. In English I, I teach skills with an assortment of works that we study by genre. You can learn to draw conclusions, analyze cause and effect, compare and contrast, etc with ANY literature.
    Ok, I get it from this point of view...

    I agree, most people wouldn't read such classic books unless someone made them do it.
    And I am the complete opposite, I do things only when people don't "make" me do it but only when I feel it's my own decision to do them. How do you deal with that?

    In a lot of cases you can read a book and completely miss the whole point of it.
    So? It's not like an engineer building a bridge with wrong measurements, resulting in the possible death of people. It's just a book, it should be a pleasure to read.
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  3. #43
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    With your options, when I saw 'English' I was envisioning more the grammar stuff, and analyzing literature - so that's why I chose it as my least favorite.

    But I read *a lot*, and have gone through many of the classics (by choice! ), and consider many of them favorites. I'm just not one to enjoy sitting in a room dissecting them - that's a surefire way of boring me, and it takes the joy out of the novels.

    But while I was in school, history was definitely my least favorite - I found it incredibly boring (although...in hindsight, a lot of it depended on the teaching method. I had a few teachers that livened it up and made it more fascinating). Now that I'm out of school....I find history much more palatable and I enjoy it in small doses. Much more so the older history than current events. I hate current events.

    Math and science classes were my favorites in school.
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  4. #44
    The Destroyer Colors's Avatar
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    I love English! I hate English classes. Bad books. Arbitary and uninspiring writing topics. Sentimental teachers who want to use you to fulfill their debt to society (because everyone owes it to make a mark upon the world!) *rolls eyes*. Regurgitating what "smart" people have told you about this piece of literature.

    1. History: The worst- we never get to study the interesting parts of history. Ancient cultures and that sort of antropological stuff. Just dates and times through great bias- and no individual exploration of the topic! Boring. (I also had very awful history teachers.)
    2. English: The second worst.
    3. Math: Math is really boring. But at least it's consistent. You have a problem and there's a way to solve it and the answer is the same every time. Calculus is somewhat useless though. I'm alright at it, so I don't mind too much, but it doesn't inspire me much.
    4. Science. I like science a lot. I've avoided Physics so far though. But I've taken plenty of chemistry, and I like it a lot, though all the lab write-ups and grueling lab schedule are sort of deflating at times. I like the theoretical parts better. And the math is pretty easy. I hate/love Biology. Mostly the hate is for ecology, which is inexact and lots of "maybe"s and approximations and dull formulas and pro-Earth talk. I love genetics though.

  5. #45
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    I've officially left the forum, but I answer anyway (I have 2 minutes of spare time).

    I would hate to say any of those were my hated subjects. Really. They all are my favourite subjects.. but, from top to bottom..
    Science
    Math
    English
    History

  6. #46
    Senior Member wedekit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    And I am the complete opposite, I do things only when people don't "make" me do it but only when I feel it's my own decision to do them. How do you deal with that?

    So? It's not like an engineer building a bridge with wrong measurements, resulting in the possible death of people. It's just a book, it should be a pleasure to read.
    Umm... I said most people wouldn't, so congratulations for being outside of that category.

    The difference between us would be that to me it is not just a book. An author is an engineer of a story. Of course it's not like an engineer building a bridge. There is a big, huge gap in between sciences and humanities. They are incomparable.
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  7. #47
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wedekit View Post
    Umm... I said most people wouldn't, so congratulations for being outside of that category.
    I want to be more idealistic in regard to humanity and thus think that it's not true that most people wouldn't; and if they don't, it's because maybe they have other talents-vocations that do not include reading classics. Nothing wrong with that.

    The difference between us would be that to me it is not just a book. An author is an engineer of a story. Of course it's not like an engineer building a bridge. There is a big, huge gap in between sciences and humanities. They are incomparable.
    And that's why I am against literature analysis being graded, there is no objective standard to which I can compare what I think.
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  8. #48
    Senior Member wedekit's Avatar
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    Sorry to have to pull out my Feeling hat but the more people stop reading the classics the more abstract parts of humanities past cultures and lifestyles fade away. This is a big problem in America especially. A good deal of people I have met have never read 1984 or Fahrenheit 451. Books with messages that should always be heard and acknowledged, especially the youth. Now I can't say how I feel about the way your papers are graded, and I will admit to you that I rarely get a good grade on essays due to me feeling uncomfortable writing about my opinions on someone's writing. I always feel I don't know enough, or that the teacher is expecting something specific that I could have missed. I don't see it as very fair either. However, that's just a flaw in the system; they want to try and harness your writing skills but it really just relies on what the teacher expects, and that isn't standard of anything. I have had teachers that gave me awesome grades for my papers because I put in effort and showed them that I at least paid attention in class... and then would basically maul my essay with a red pen with what I could improve.

    I guess writing is like dancing or singing. Some people can do it, some can't. It's very hard to teach it to someone except by example. I'm sure their degree means they are familiar with classic examples of well written literature and can have a valid opinion on the matter.
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  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by wedekit View Post
    Sorry to have to pull out my Feeling hat but the more people stop reading the classics the more abstract parts of humanities past cultures and lifestyles fade away. This is a big problem in America especially. A good deal of people I have met have never read 1984 or Fahrenheit 451.
    It would have been nice to have seen one of those books instead of something like Romeo and Juliet (which his pretty much a glorified soap opera.) It would seem that there are enough books out there that bring up useful issues, or interesting ones that have effects outside the story, that would be enjoyable to read, but as often as not it doesn't occur that way. (There is also the chance of people analyzing or describing an issue that isn't really there, and comes more from the person reading it than from the book.)

  10. #50
    The Destroyer Colors's Avatar
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    Really? 1984? Certainly better than Romeo and Juliet, content-wise... but what is the message there- Totalitarianism is bad? Why don't we learn the HISTORY of why totalitarianism is bad- and the sort of world that inspired Orwell to write 1984, instead of a rambling, ham-fisted "mind game"? There are real life applications to this content (possibly China, North Korea, Myanmar, United States, Britain), but instead of putting it in the real-life grey context, we have overwrought alarmism.

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