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View Poll Results: What is your LEAST favorite subject?

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  • English

    23 30.67%
  • History

    15 20.00%
  • Math

    31 41.33%
  • Science

    6 8.00%
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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    I liked PE. I was not the best athlete by any stretch of the imagination, but I was faster than most kids and definitely more physically coordinated than most of my nerdy friends (still have issues with bike-riding, however).

    That pretty much seals it for me. My counselor was grasping for straws when he suspected I could have Asperger's.
    In some ways, however, my motor skills are well-developed. For example, my handwriting is neater than most people's (I'm also somewhat a perfectionist about that) and I am also a pretty fast typist.

    EDIT: It seems that any student who isn't social is suspected to have Asperger's these days.

  2. #32
    you are right mippus's Avatar
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    I hated Maths most. A lot depended on the teachers I got. For all courses, I had some good and bad ones. But the Maths teachers were the only ones who didn't make the effort to try and convey any enthousiasm for their subject. In my former highschool it appeared to be self-evident that Math's was the most important subject and thus it was never promoted in an enthousiastic way...
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  3. #33
    Senior Member FallsPioneer's Avatar
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    I have a distinct favorite, but there is something that I appreciate in all four of the core classes, preventing me somewhat from actually making a choice. I could spend days trying to figure this one out.

    That being said, I'm just going to go and say that Math is my least favorite. I can learn and do math, I'm fairly good at it, and I derive (I'm in calculus right now, and I'm getting tired of this) satisfaction from solving problems, but I have never been bored as often as I have in math classes, and in no other classes have I felt that the subject matter was "going nowhere." Classic "when am I going to use this in my life" stuff. I like design and computers too, but this still gets irritating. There's too much redundancy. I got my first and only progress report in calculus. I've only had one math teacher I didn't like.

    Science is fairly neat. There are all sorts of neat sciences; there's variety, and that's why I prefer it to math, even though there's a boatload of math involved in science. But I loathed some of the hands-on stuff, especially in chemistry...I felt pretty incompetent at times. By the way, chemistry pisses me off somewhat. However, science has much purpose to it, and I especially like how science provides understanding and is what will create the future. It all hinges on science. I've only had one science teacher I didn't like.

    I see History as timeless and continually in the making, thus making it relevant to me, although I don't find all of it interesting. I could care less about remembering the dates of things (something I always failed at in history classes.) I'm a principle/theory/idea dude; I'm great with a progression of events, and cause-and-effect. There's so much to learn. I don't think that all histories are that interesting, however, the vast majority I like. There's that saying: "Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it." I've only had one history teacher I didn't like.

    English is the most important subject. I never thought much of it at first, largely because I hated my junior high teachers, but later on I just started liking it. Think about it: refining the articulation of thought. And great literature! There is style and meaning; the class itself is amorphous. I understand how much of a joke a class that encourages expression can be, where validity is judged on apparent thought process, and to some, the idea of creating all of the rights and wrongs is incomprehensible, but I can handle that, as I can now control overthinking.

    I've only had two English teachers I didn't like (hur hur I made a joke.) But the other ones have been my favorites, from 10th grade on.

    So,

    English > History > Science > Math

    Oh, and I never really thought much of P.E. I'm a runner, but I don't think P.E.'s that special.
    Still using a needle to break apart a grain of sand.

  4. #34
    Senior Member wedekit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FallsPioneer View Post
    I have a distinct favorite, but there is something that I appreciate in all four of the core classes, preventing me somewhat from actually making a choice. I could spend days trying to figure this one out.

    That being said, I'm just going to go and say that Math is my least favorite. I can learn and do math, I'm fairly good at it, and I derive (I'm in calculus right now, and I'm getting tired of this) satisfaction from solving problems, but I have never been bored as often as I have in math classes, and in no other classes have I felt that the subject matter was "going nowhere." Classic "when am I going to use this in my life" stuff. I like design and computers too, but this still gets irritating. There's too much redundancy. I got my first and only progress report in calculus. I've only had one math teacher I didn't like.

    Science is fairly neat. There are all sorts of neat sciences; there's variety, and that's why I prefer it to math, even though there's a boatload of math involved in science. But I loathed some of the hands-on stuff, especially in chemistry...I felt pretty incompetent at times. By the way, chemistry pisses me off somewhat. However, science has much purpose to it, and I especially like how science provides understanding and is what will create the future. It all hinges on science. I've only had one science teacher I didn't like.

    I see History as timeless and continually in the making, thus making it relevant to me, although I don't find all of it interesting. I could care less about remembering the dates of things (something I always failed at in history classes.) I'm a principle/theory/idea dude; I'm great with a progression of events, and cause-and-effect. There's so much to learn. I don't think that all histories are that interesting, however, the vast majority I like. There's that saying: "Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it." I've only had one history teacher I didn't like.

    English is the most important subject. I never thought much of it at first, largely because I hated my junior high teachers, but later on I just started liking it. Think about it: refining the articulation of thought. And great literature! There is style and meaning; the class itself is amorphous. I understand how much of a joke a class that encourages expression can be, where validity is judged on apparent thought process, and to some, the idea of creating all of the rights and wrongs is incomprehensible, but I can handle that, as I can now control overthinking.

    I've only had two English teachers I didn't like (hur hur I made a joke.) But the other ones have been my favorites, from 10th grade on.

    So,

    English > History > Science > Math

    Oh, and I never really thought much of P.E. I'm a runner, but I don't think P.E.'s that special.
    Yes! There is a lot of satisfaction received from solving a good math problem. For some reason I always miss my math classes when I don't take them for a semester. I rely on those classes to prove to others that I am smart, I just SUCK at regurgitating abstract philosophical thought back onto paper during tests. Seriously, I can out-math anyone I know. I had a foreign professor teaching my Inferential Statistics class. Everyone except me made bad grades on the tests. That's because I would read and take notes on the entire chapter before going to class and work out all of the example problems until I knew what I was doing. Then I would go to class and ignore that crazy because she taught it in a very confusing way. I believe I made the only A in the class. She asked to keep my "cheat sheet" (the kind they let you make) so that she could use it herself. I was actually disappointed with how easy her class was. Her tests were really easy; she only gave one long question to work out and the rest were multiple choice or short answer... math always brings out my inner nerd. I rarely do that kind of studying for any other class.

    (The fact that math doesn't have any kind of distinct final destination does kind of ruin things, though.)
    Last edited by wedekit; 02-03-2008 at 02:12 AM. Reason: P.S.
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  5. #35

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    Math, by far.

    It's funny, because I enjoyed physics and astronomy, and those are basically math in a different costume. But straight math classes just bored me to death.
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  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by wedekit View Post
    (The fact that math doesn't have any kind of distinct final destination does kind of ruin things, though.)
    That's why it is second on my list after science (physics to be more specific).

    But math may in-fact be the most broadly applied of human endeavors. How many other things have the same bit of work affect everything form the buildings people live in (applied math through physics), to the food we eat (applied math through statistics through quality control), to the use of this website (applied math through computing), ....

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  7. #37
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    I dislike english (or the italian's correspondent which obviously italian) because grading papers is useless in that subject: there is no objective criteria by which to compare what one has written, thus the teacher only imposes its taste to the natural writing inclination of the kids. Similarly pointless was the compulsory reading of novels: I can read novels by myself and derive my own interpretations, thank you. However, no, we had to be taught the "correct" interpretation of symbolism. Generally I did fairly well at it, but it seemed to be mostly a training on how to please teachers rather than real learning.

    I liked best physics and chemistry, by far. Probably because: - there was some "objective" anchor; - i was naturally good at them.

    Phisical education was okay, but not challenging enough for people that were already playing sports...
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  8. #38
    Senior Member Eileen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scantilyclad View Post
    yeah we were required to take 2.5 semesters of PE. PE was horrible. Definitely worse than math. I know everyone had to take it, but it seemed like i was always in pe with the most incompetent people on the planet every semester. and i didn't like to run track because people would sit on the side of the track and watch my boobs bounce.
    I agree that P.E. sucks, but it is not a "core area." It is a required elective, like arts, vocational, and computer classes. Academic (and now, pretty much necessarily TESTED) areas are what are considered "core."
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  9. #39
    The Unwieldy Clawed One Falcarius's Avatar
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    Out of those 4 lessons Falcarius hated English the most. Falcarius thinks it is because in English class he had deal with an alien subject called 'emotion'. Falcarius does not do emotion like Homo sapiens, therefore, learning poetry made Falcarius want to slit his wrist. It was not so much that Falcarius disliked poetry, but more he did not know how how to deal with the emotional baggage that came with it.

    Science and history were Falcarius favorites out of the 4. He probably liked chemistry the best out of the sciences as he liked doing experiments and setting things on fire is cool . Falcarius also likes Maths, he is not very good at it, but ironically Falcarius decided to study Engineering when he left High school. Maths is like a drug to Falcarius, he loves it but it seems to fry his brain cells.
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  10. #40
    Senior Member Eileen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    I dislike english (or the italian's correspondent which obviously italian) because grading papers is useless in that subject: there is no objective criteria by which to compare what one has written, thus the teacher only imposes its taste to the natural writing inclination of the kids. Similarly pointless was the compulsory reading of novels: I can read novels by myself and derive my own interpretations, thank you. However, no, we had to be taught the "correct" interpretation of symbolism. Generally I did fairly well at it, but it seemed to be mostly a training on how to please teachers rather than real learning.
    I differ so! (of course--since I'm an English teacher )

    Some thoughts:

    -There is good and bad writing in terms of organization, support and elaboration, grammar/mechanics, and the like. This can be evaluated pretty fairly using a rubric, and I think that the best way to handle writing is by somehow incorporating two standards: 1. a standard of progress, where you compare a student's writing to only that student's previous writings, and 2. a decently objective standard where you look for specific levels of achievement in certain areas (support/elab, organization, grammar/mechanics, the presence of a thesis, etc etc etc). The ability to articulate a coherent argument is an important skill, and coherence really isn't THAT subjective. Trust me--there are lots of people, highly intelligent people even, who struggle with organization when writing down thoughts. And I think that it frequently doesn't matter how bright you are if you can't explain what you understand. That may not be a fair standard... but if you can't articulate what you know, your knowledge is only useful to you.

    -As an English teacher, I may be looking for specifics in the interpretation of literature that take historical context into account, but pretty much if you can EXPLAIN (coherently) the reason that you believe something, I'm satisfied with your interpretation. Maybe I differ from other teachers on this, but I'm looking for thinking skills, not specific interpretations. There has to be a preponderance of evidence for an interpretation, though, and you have to be able to find it and use it.

    -English teachers are not supposed to teach works; we're supposed to teach skills. In English III, I teach skills with American works. In English I, I teach skills with an assortment of works that we study by genre. You can learn to draw conclusions, analyze cause and effect, compare and contrast, etc with ANY literature.

    -That said--and I think this is my most subjective statement so far--I think it's good to be exposed to the literature that you read in the English classroom, simply because many Americans (just for an example) would NOT ever read Death of a Salesman, Of Mice and Men, The Great Gatsby, Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God, etc... and they're part of our history and culture. And many Americans (just for an example) would never read Things Fall Apart, Oedipus the King, Night, All Quiet on the Western Front, the Tao Te Ching, etc... and they're part of the world's history and culture. These are important things to be exposed to, even if you never end up experiencing them very deeply.
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