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  1. #41
    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTPness View Post
    See, to me, an answer like "I'm good at working in a team" is so very basic. It doesn't seem like a complete thought. And it doesn't differentiate you from the other 894 million that would say the same exact thing. I feel like I have to explain what makes me stand out, what makes me exceptional. I feel like every other person interviewing for the same job is going to say "because I like working in a team". If all the candidates answered so simply, how would they know which candidates were different or better? If I were interviewing someone and asked them what they bring to the table and their response was simply, "I like working in a team", I'd be thinking, "For real? Is that it?" Go a little further! Tell me what makes you better (or at least different) from the other candidates that will be coming into the interview room after you leave. Make me remember you and what you can bring to the table."

    "I like to work in a team." "That's it Carl! Our search for the right candidate is over. We finally found what we're looking for. We finally came across someone who...................likes to work in a team!"
    That's more of a common sense thing, isn't it? If somebody was to tell me that "I'm good at working in a team" and leave it at that. I'd be like 'so what' in my head, but ask outwardly for an example. In fact, in an interview setting they should be prepared to answer with explanations/examples.

    I have similar experiences, but I'm sure of my S- I too will zone out while driving, just to catch myself to avoid ramming into someone. When I snap out of it, I can't recall any of my surroundings that whole time, thinking to myself "I could have driven off a cliff" and laughing to myself. I attribute that to introversion more than anything else. It would be nice for more S types to chime in here. My ex - ISFP, had those judgemental, intuitive appearing conclusions about people as well. For each time she was right, she was wrong the next. Again, I think it's the motivation of the person- Most Fs- I don't want to say women here- are interested less in what's being said and more in what your body language, facial expressions, and tone are saying. That's where they get 'a woman's intuition' from. Where for me, I'm listening, but depending on the circumstance, the amount of 'intuition' I use is based on my interest. For example, when talking to my nieces and nephews, at work when helping a co-worker out, and even when dealing with a girlfriend, I'll try to discern the message behind the words. Not always easy to want to act in line with what I sense there, but it's fun to explore it, if the person is willing.

  2. #42
    As Long As It Takes.... Redbone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    Hey - that's actually not a good assessment on your part. I experience this A LOT with sensors...I regularly talk to an ISFJ who seems bewildered by the fact that I ALWAYS want to know "why" and he sees it as the hallmark of being an NF, and it annoys him.

    My ex - also a sensor - told me I was overly analytical and he got sick of me analyzing his behavior.

    My grandfather's wife - another sensor - used to tell me that I thought about stupid stuff that didn't matter. My grandfather - another sensor! - told me that I was "good at the wrong things."

    I could go on and on. This kind of thing is real, even if you are the exception to the rule, you need to remember that you are the exception.
    I have experienced this A LOT. My oldest sister is ENTJ and she is one of the few people I know that 'tolerate' my 'whys'. I have been yelled at by my ex (a sensor) and others I know (sensors) to stop asking why or just accept the answer. Or puzzled about why I am wanting to know these things that don't matter.

    It hurt my feelings and I was bewildered by it. "What's the matter with wanting to know 'why'?"

    It seems that they are focused mainly on 'what is' and 'what was'. I try to remember this when talking to people but it is so hard for me stop analyzing and peeling the layers back...one by one. I don't know if this has mainly happened with me in dealing with sensors...I'm not sure but it certainly seems to occur more so than not. FWIW, I have envied other people's ability to take things 'as is'. I've driven myself nuts (and I'm sure it'll happen again) trying to figure out 'why'.

  3. #43
    Senior Member INTPness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    Knowing when someone lies to you. It's like finding the wrong color thread in a weave pattern but more complex. It usually doesn't hit me until later. It will come to me in a sudden flash--"This is wrong. Doesn't fit, doesn't go here." There aren't usually any 'facts' it just doesn't fit.

    I have found out some really awful things like this. I value truth a great deal and to feel the poison of being lied to is really bad. So yeah, this can suck (or is this Ti and I'm just totally off-base?).
    Yeah, this is a big one. I do the same thing. I can sometimes read people like a book. Even in situations where it's a little white lie, I'll be thinking "You're so full of it - you don't even believe the words coming out of your own mouth." You're right - you just "know" they're lying because it does not fit with the rest of the puzzle.

    An example of a white lie (completely unimportant in the grand scheme of life, but helps illustrate the point here) happened the other day at work. It was a co-workers last day on the job and usually people will buy the person a card and have everyone sign it or even bring in some food to say "farewell". Well, as people started trickling into work, each of them walked in with *nothing in their hands*. So, I started thinking to myself, "Uh oh, someone dropped the ball here! Maybe I should run out real quick and get something for this guy or it's going to look real bad on us." Well, in comes this one guy with a breakfast platter - but it wasn't someone who works real closely with the guy who was leaving - in fact he probably wouldn't even have known that it was the other guys last day. I knew right away that this was just a coincidence, but a funny coincidence. So, he puts the platter down for everyone to eat and goes into his office. The guy who is leaving had bought a card to say "farewell" to all of his co-workers (he bought a thank you card for all of them, but they didn't buy one for him). When the card got passed to the guy's office who brought in the food, he came out and spoke briefly and quietly with another co-worker. My intuition knew exactly how that conversation went even though I wasn't privy to the conversation:

    Guy that brought the food (whispering): Hey, uh, I just read this card. Is today *Pete's* last day?
    Other person: Yeah, it's his last day.
    Guy: Did anyone bring him a card or food?
    Other person: Not so far. And pretty much everyone is here now, so it looks like everyone forgot.
    Guy: Well, I brought in food. We can use that as his "going away breakfast".
    Other person: OK, yeah, let's do that!

    Then the guy comes into the hallway and announces, for all to hear:

    "Hey, there, Pete! I just read your card. It's been a pleasure with you. We brought in some nice, hot breakfast since you're leaving us, so come on over and get some while it's hot!"

    My intution: Hahahahahahahahaha! That was a good one. You're so full of it!

    See, Pete never knew. Pete left thinking that they brought in breakfast for him, but the intuition tells a much different story.
    NTJ's are the only types that have ever made me feel emo.
    ENP's are the only types that have ever made me feel like a sensor.


    There are two great days in a person's life - the day we are born and the day we discover why. --William Barclay

  4. #44
    Senior Member INTPness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IZthe411 View Post
    My ex - ISFP, had those judgemental, intuitive appearing conclusions about people as well. For each time she was right, she was wrong the next. Again, I think it's the motivation of the person- Most Fs- I don't want to say women here- are interested less in what's being said and more in what your body language, facial expressions, and tone are saying. That's where they get 'a woman's intuition' from. Where for me, I'm listening, but depending on the circumstance, the amount of 'intuition' I use is based on my interest.
    I think what you might be forgetting here (and I could be wrong), is that she was ISFP. While ISFP's have intuition as their 3rd function, it's not their primary or even aux function. So it's not going to be as "honed" as someone who leads with intuition - INFJ/INTJ (Ni) or ENFP/ENTP (Ne). Try telling an INxJ that their intuition isn't "all that accurate" - or that it's probably wrong just as often as it's right. They'll tell you that this isn't the case. While it is somewhat fuzzy at times, it's also very accurate. It's not just some nonsensical function that doesn't do the person any good or doesn't serve them with accurate information. These types that I list are innately very good at reading people and reading into situations - when danger might be present, when someone's motives aren't right, when someone is lying. Something in the environment or the atmosphere is off and they pick up on these things. When intuition is one of your leading functions, you can't really "turn it off" and "just get back to sensing". It dominates how you think. It dominates how you see the world. You're constantly reading into situations, looking for hidden meanings. It's not even something that's concious most of the time. They don't think, "I'm going to use my intuition to see if this person is lying." It's not like that. It's just the natural way of functioning for them.

    It's sometimes very hard to explain intuition to sensors. They have intuition too, but when you explain it to them in great detail they think you're talking crazy talk. My ENFP friend and I were explaining intuition to an ESTJ once and he was like, "I think you guys need to take a trip to the nut house and stay there a while. I think you're talking out of your butt is all your doing." We just looked at each other and were like

    Intuition is just as viable of a function as any of the other functions. It's not hocus pocus B.S. It's real, it's effective for those who use it and it serves them well - trust me when I say that. It comes in handy.
    NTJ's are the only types that have ever made me feel emo.
    ENP's are the only types that have ever made me feel like a sensor.


    There are two great days in a person's life - the day we are born and the day we discover why. --William Barclay

  5. #45
    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTPness View Post
    I think what you might be forgetting here (and I could be wrong), is that she was ISFP. While ISFP's have intuition as their 3rd function, it's not their primary or even aux function. So it's not going to be as "honed" as someone who leads with intuition - INFJ/INTJ (Ni) or ENFP/ENTP (Ne). Try telling an INxJ that their intuition isn't "all that accurate" - or that it's probably wrong just as often as it's right. They'll tell you that this isn't the case. While it is somewhat fuzzy at times, it's also very accurate. It's not just some nonsensical function that doesn't do the person any good or doesn't serve them with accurate information. These types that I list are innately very good at reading people and reading into situations - when danger might be present, when someone's motives aren't right, when someone is lying. Something in the environment or the atmosphere is off and they pick up on these things. When intuition is one of your leading functions, you can't really "turn it off" and "just get back to sensing". It dominates how you think. It dominates how you see the world. You're constantly reading into situations, looking for hidden meanings. It's not even something that's concious most of the time. They don't think, "I'm going to use my intuition to see if this person is lying." It's not like that. It's just the natural way of functioning for them.

    It's sometimes very hard to explain intuition to sensors. They have intuition too, but when you explain it to them in great detail they think you're talking crazy talk. My ENFP friend and I were explaining intuition to an ESTJ once and he was like, "I think you guys need to take a trip to the nut house and stay there a while. I think you're talking out of your butt is all your doing." We just looked at each other and were like

    Intuition is just as viable of a function as any of the other functions. It's not hocus pocus B.S. It's real, it's effective for those who use it and it serves them well - trust me when I say that. It comes in handy.
    You make sense here, man. I agree with you, too. I think your initial example opening up the thread was good, and your last day breakfast as well. I find that some of the follow up wasn't- it was more of everyday things that can happen to anyone of any type.

    I recognize my use of it, but I don't 'trust' it, if that makes sense. Sometimes things will become apparent, I'll have a hunch, and I won't accept what it's telling me until I get more information. Sometimes that's too late, and I regret not just going on it earlier. That has to be my primary working against my inferior, in this case.

    I think it's hard to put the functions into too many words without muddying the water, especially the introverted ones. Like you said, for most of us, we just do it, and it's hard to explain to someone else how it works. Personally it's not hard for me to understand how intuition works- on paper. It's hard to experience it- how Ne dominates you like Si does me. That's where I think Ns on this board can learn as well.

  6. #46
    Senior Member INTPness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IZthe411 View Post
    You make sense here, man. I agree with you, too. I think your initial example opening up the thread was good, and your last day breakfast as well. I find that some of the follow up wasn't- it was more of everyday things that can happen to anyone of any type.

    I recognize my use of it, but I don't 'trust' it, if that makes sense. Sometimes things will become apparent, I'll have a hunch, and I won't accept what it's telling me until I get more information. Sometimes that's too late, and I regret not just going on it earlier. That has to be my primary working against my inferior, in this case.

    I think it's hard to put the functions into too many words without muddying the water, especially the introverted ones. Like you said, for most of us, we just do it, and it's hard to explain to someone else how it works. Personally it's not hard for me to understand how intuition works- on paper. It's hard to experience it- how Ne dominates you like Si does me. That's where I think Ns on this board can learn as well.
    Yeah, no doubt about it. Si is your dominant function. I've said before on the forums, that whatever your primary function is, that you're going to be the best at using it and knowing how it works. You're going to the "expert" on your dominant function - whatever it is. Si is my third function, but my Si doesn't even compare to the Si that I've seen in ISTJ's. They really blow me away sometimes with their Si. I also understand what you mean about "understanding how it works, but not being quick to trust it" - I sometimes read posts of INxJ's and also have friends who are ENxP and it's like their intuition is a step ahead of mine. They trust it a little more easily than I do and they're a little more comfortable relying on it because it's their primary and it's only my aux. So, it's all about the order of your functions.

    What Ne basically does for me is it presents me with possibilities - things that could potentially be true in a given situation. And then I have to pick which option I think is the best to act on. I'm probably a little more skeptical or hesitant to act on things than ENxP's. They are probably more "in tune" with their intuition. But, the more time that passes, the more I live and learn, the more I realize that my Ne is very valuable to me - if I just trust it. I sometimes want more information, as you mention, and then later I end up thinking, "Aha! My intuition was right! I should have acted on that!" So, over time I think we learn to rely on it more and trust it more. Afterall, it's there for a reason.
    NTJ's are the only types that have ever made me feel emo.
    ENP's are the only types that have ever made me feel like a sensor.


    There are two great days in a person's life - the day we are born and the day we discover why. --William Barclay

  7. #47
    That's my name biotch! JoSunshine's Avatar
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    Sorry to randomly jump in to your conversation guys...

    This is more about being an NF - knowing that the guy my friend just started dating and is crazy about is a douche bag within 15 minutes of meeting him and having to sit back for two months waiting for my friend to figure it out.

    ...carry on with the conversation
    "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. " - Dr. Seuss
    I can't spell...get over it

    Slightly ENFJ, totally JoSunshine
    Extroverted (E) 52.5%........Introverted (I) 47.5%
    Intuitive (N) 65.63%..........Sensing (S) 34.38%
    Feeling (F) 55.56%............Thinking (T) 44.44%
    Judging (J) 51.43%............Perceiving (P) 48.57%

  8. #48
    Member October Rust's Avatar
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    Forgetting to turn lights off
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    Johari / Nohari

  9. #49
    Senior Member INTPness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoSunshine View Post
    Sorry to randomly jump in to your conversation guys...

    This is more about being an NF - knowing that the guy my friend just started dating and is crazy about is a douche bag within 15 minutes of meeting him and having to sit back for two months waiting for my friend to figure it out.

    ...carry on with the conversation
    NTJ's are the only types that have ever made me feel emo.
    ENP's are the only types that have ever made me feel like a sensor.


    There are two great days in a person's life - the day we are born and the day we discover why. --William Barclay

  10. #50
    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTPness View Post
    Yeah, no doubt about it. Si is your dominant function. I've said before on the forums, that whatever your primary function is, that you're going to be the best at using it and knowing how it works. You're going to the "expert" on your dominant function - whatever it is. Si is my third function, but my Si doesn't even compare to the Si that I've seen in ISTJ's. They really blow me away sometimes with their Si. I also understand what you mean about "understanding how it works, but not being quick to trust it" - I sometimes read posts of INxJ's and also have friends who are ENxP and it's like their intuition is a step ahead of mine. They trust it a little more easily than I do and they're a little more comfortable relying on it because it's their primary and it's only my aux. So, it's all about the order of your functions.

    What Ne basically does for me is it presents me with possibilities - things that could potentially be true in a given situation. And then I have to pick which option I think is the best to act on. I'm probably a little more skeptical or hesitant to act on things than ENxP's. They are probably more "in tune" with their intuition. But, the more time that passes, the more I live and learn, the more I realize that my Ne is very valuable to me - if I just trust it. I sometimes want more information, as you mention, and then later I end up thinking, "Aha! My intuition was right! I should have acted on that!" So, over time I think we learn to rely on it more and trust it more. Afterall, it's there for a reason.
    I had it mixed up- you are a Ne aux. My bad. Still it's more influential than mines. But yeah, I was telling Marm how I was re-listening to a podcast yesterday that I had started to listening to on Saturday. As it replayed I was able to recall where exactly I was when they guy (Tony Kornheiser- PTI) said certain things- I was at an intersection when he said X. He said Y, I remember counting change to get my coffee at Mickey D's. He said Z, I remember doing a u-turn to park. Not that I had committed any of this stuff to memory. There was nothing I did. It just recalled as I listened to it. That's my Si, and it's random as well. I don't choose to remember certain things- certain things stick and certain things don't. I am likely to remember numbers, though. My friends call me 'Rainman' LOL.

    This was probably my biggest Ne moment- I was playing ball and in the middle of the game it hit me- I had to break up with my girlfriend! It was bothering me for months prior, and breaking up was a possibility, but I was like 'Nah' that ain't it, we'll work it out, but that day it was abundantly clear.....I didn't listen to it then, again not trusting myself. We ended breaking up in a more emotionally charged way about a month later. I should have listened. That and leaving my first job- I had a similar, but not so hard hitting experience. I ignored it and ended up leaving on more uglier terms. So when I say I need more information, it's usually when it's painfully obvious. I will learn to trust it more.

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