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  1. #11
    garbage
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    Unplug your earphones, TV, and Internet cable, then do what it is that you're supposed to do. Forced tunnel vision.


    and/or get into the habit of tunnel vision, as difficult as that sounds

  2. #12
    Senior Member Blown Ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    I've discovered the Holy Grail of human nature. I only need to be able to go into tunnel vision mode.
    You'll have to explain better, if you're able to.

  3. #13
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    110mph down a crowded highway.

    Approaching the future love of your life.

    A bite from a Black Mamba.

  4. #14
    is an ambi-turner BRMC117's Avatar
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    run into a burning building
    "I put the fires out."
    "you made them worse."
    "worse...or better?"

  5. #15
    Twerking & Lurking ayoitsStepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idec Sdawkminn View Post
    I've always gotten tunnel vision when running a race in a track meet.
    This. Or when I'm about to pass out from dehydration. Which is weird that they would both be linked in that way.
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGuffin View Post
    ayoitsStepho is becoming someone else. Actually her true self, a rite of passage.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blown Ghost View Post
    You'll have to explain better, if you're able to.
    Contentment and tunnel vision are intimately related I reckon.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Blown Ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    Contentment and tunnel vision are intimately related I reckon.
    Ah, that makes sense. One wouldn't suffer from "grass is greener" syndrome if one couldn't see the other side in the first place.

    Personally, I think the best attitude in this regard is not selective ignorance but a combination of thankfulness for what you have and indifference towards the rest. I understand, not a popular opinion in a capitalist country but I'm convinced the most natural and happiest way for people to live is to live simply, enjoying life for what it is instead of trying to keep up with the Jeffersons, so to speak.

    Appreciation is a learned skilled. The better you are at it, the more you will start to see that those without it are really the ones missing out regardless of how much they have. The first step in learning to appreciate is to slow down and look around. I imagine the ability to appreciate will continue to deteriorate as modern technology allows us to go faster and faster, making it all that more unlikely that we'll stop and smell the roses.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blown Ghost View Post
    Ah, that makes sense. One wouldn't suffer from "grass is greener" syndrome if one couldn't see the other side in the first place.

    Personally, I think the best attitude in this regard is not selective ignorance but a combination of thankfulness for what you have and indifference towards the rest. I understand, not a popular opinion in a capitalist country but I'm convinced the most natural and happiest way for people to live is to live simply, enjoying life for what it is instead of trying to keep up with the Jeffersons, so to speak.

    Appreciation is a learned skilled. The better you are at it, the more you will start to see that those without it are really the ones missing out regardless of how much they have.
    Yes, I agree that appreciation is the way to a more fulfilling life. But one can't fake thankfulness, though. And you can only appreciate what you like right? Tunnel vision though, imo, makes one appreciate simple things a lot more.

  9. #19
    Glycerine
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    Be super sleep deprived. It works great for me. Selective zoning out also works good like stare at something for a long time. This gets me into the zone all the time.

  10. #20
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idec Sdawkminn View Post
    I was meaning with your thoughts as in blocking out everything but what you are focusing on, not just what you are seeing.
    Self-Discipline
    Building Self-Discipline

    My philosophy of how to build self-discipline is best explained by an analogy. Self-discipline is like a muscle. The more you train it, the stronger you become. The less you train it, the weaker you become.

    Just as everyone has different muscular strength, we all possess different levels of self-discipline. Everyone has some — if you can hold your breath a few seconds, you have some self-discipline. But not everyone has developed their discipline to the same degree.

    Just as it takes muscle to build muscle, it takes self-discipline to build self-discipline.

    The way to build self-discipline is analogous to using progressive weight training to build muscle. This means lifting weights that are close to your limit. Note that when you weight train, you lift weights that are within your ability to lift. You push your muscles until they fail, and then you rest.

    Similarly, the basic method to build self-discipline is to tackle challenges that you can successfully accomplish but which are near your limit. This doesn’t mean trying something and failing at it every day, nor does it mean staying within your comfort zone. You will gain no strength trying to lift a weight that you cannot budge, nor will you gain strength lifting weights that are too light for you. You must start with weights/challenges that are within your current ability to lift but which are near your limit.

    Progressive training means that once you succeed, you increase the challenge. If you keep working out with the same weights, you won’t get any stronger. Similarly, if you fail to challenge yourself in life, you won’t gain any more self-discipline.

    Just as most people have very weak muscles compared to how strong they could become with training, most people are very weak in their level of self-discipline.

    It’s a mistake to try to push yourself too hard when trying to build self-discipline. If you try to transform your entire life overnight by setting dozens of new goals for yourself and expecting yourself to follow through consistently starting the very next day, you’re almost certain to fail. This is like a person going to the gym for the first time ever and packing 300 pounds on the bench press. You will only look silly.

    If you can only lift 10 lbs, you can only lift 10 lbs. There’s no shame in starting where you are. I recall when I began working with a personal trainer several years ago, on my first attempt at doing a barbell shoulder press, I could only lift a 7-lb bar with no weight on it. My shoulders were very weak because I’d never trained them. But within a few months I was up to 60 lbs.

    Similarly, if you’re very undisciplined right now, you can still use what little discipline you have to build more. The more disciplined you become, the easier life gets. Challenges that were once impossible for you will eventually seem like child’s play. As you get stronger, the same weights will seem lighter and lighter.

    Don’t compare yourself to other people. It won’t help. You’ll only find what you expect to find. If you think you’re weak, everyone else will seem stronger. If you think you’re strong, everyone else will seem weaker. There’s no point in doing this. Simply look at where you are now, and aim to get better as you go forward.

    Let’s consider an example.

    Suppose you want to develop the ability to do 8 solid hours of work each day, since you know it will make a real difference in your career. I was listening to an audio program this morning that quoted a study saying the average office worker spends 37% of their time in idle socializing, not to mention other vices that chew up more than 50% of work time with unproductive non-work. So there’s plenty of room for improvement.

    Perhaps you try to work a solid 8-hour day without succumbing to distractions, and you can only do it once. The next day you fail utterly. That’s OK. You did one rep of 8 hours. Two is too much for you. So cut back a bit. What duration would allow you to successfully do 5 reps (i.e. a whole week)? Could you work with concentration for one hour a day, five days in a row? If you can’t do that, cut back to 30 minutes or whatever you can do. If you succeed (or if you feel that would be too easy), then increase the challenge (i.e. the resistance).

    Once you’ve mastered a week at one level, take it up a notch the next week. And continue with this progressive training until you’ve reached your goal.

    While analogies like this are never perfect, I’ve gotten a lot of mileage out of this one. By raising the bar just a little each week, you stay within your capabilities and grow stronger over time. But when doing weight training, the actual work you do doesn’t mean anything. There’s no intrinsic benefit in lifting a weight up and down — the benefit comes from the muscle growth. However, when building self-discipline, you also get the benefit of the work you’ve done along the way, so that’s even better. It’s great when your training produces something of value AND makes you stronger.
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
    C.S. Lewis

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