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Thread: Accents

  1. #101
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by proximo View Post
    Tamworth/Ashby DLZ area then?

    Not your aass then? Cos there's that weird area where the boundaries of "arse" and "aass" cross over, though nobody in England really says "ass" unless they're aping American pronunciation. I mean Scousers sit their arses on the grass, Mancunians sit their aaass on the grass, Londoners put their arse on the grarse (lol), Somerset people put their aass on the graass and Lincolnshire's just a law unto itself.

    By "aass" I mean the "aa" to be like the a in cat, but longer, with a hard 'ss' sound. How English people say cat, obviously, not Americans.
    This video isn't me, but this man does have a similar accent to my own. It was near Burton on trent that I grew up.

    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmDQgMrYQfo"]Floods[/YOUTUBE][/QUOTE]

  2. #102
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
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    Let's have a competition: find the most obscure/incomprehensible accent you can! Here's my entry.

    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FNZVSbQcpCI"]Old rural Yorkshire dialect[/YOUTUBE]


    Another Yorkshire one, just because it's so cute:

    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB3ieNhEsDY"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB3ieNhEsDY[/YOUTUBE]

  3. #103
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by compulsiverambler View Post
    The L-to-W thing is also a feature of Cockney English, although Cockneys also pronounce L in quite a range of other ways depending on the context. I wonder, were the first Maryland settlers from the London area?
    It's entirely possible. Maryland was established as a Catholic sanctuary.

    From Wikipedia, more than you probably wanted to know:

    In 1629, George Calvert, 1st Lord Baltimore in the Irish House of Lords, fresh from his failure further north with Newfoundland's Avalon colony, applied to Charles I for a new royal charter for what was to become the Province of Maryland. Calvert's interest in creating a colony derived from his Catholicism and his desire for the creation of a haven for Catholics in the new world. In addition, he was familiar with the fortunes that had been made in tobacco in Virginia, and hoped to recoup some of the financial losses he had sustained in his earlier colonial venture in Newfoundland. George Calvert died in April 1632, but a charter for "Maryland Colony" (in Latin, "Terra Maria") was granted to his son, Cæcilius Calvert, 2nd Lord Baltimore, on June 20, 1632. The new colony was named in honor of Henrietta Maria, Queen Consort of Charles I.[36] The specific name given in the charter was phrased "Terra Mariae, anglice, Maryland". The English name was preferred over the Latin due in part to the undesired association of "Mariae" with the Spanish Jesuit Juan de Mariana.[37][38] Leonard, Cæcilius' younger brother, was put in charge of the expedition because Cæcilius did not want to go.

    To try to gain settlers, Maryland used what is known as the headright system, which originated in Jamestown. The government awarded land to people who transported colonists to Maryland.

    On March 25, 1634, Lord Baltimore sent the first settlers into this area. Although most of the settlers were Protestants, Maryland soon became one of the few regions in the British Empire where Catholics held the highest positions of political authority. Maryland was also one of the key destinations of tens of thousands of British convicts.
    I'd guess that many of the convicts were from the London area, at least.

  4. #104
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    It was near Burton on trent that I grew up.
    Lucky man!

    "Else, for what were hop-yards meant,
    Or why was Burton built on Trent?"

    -A.E. Housman

  5. #105
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    Lucky man!

    "Else, for what were hop-yards meant,
    Or why was Burton built on Trent?"

    -A.E. Housman
    Burton is good at making marmite as well, perhaps unsurprisingly.

  6. #106
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    There was a "post your voice" thread on here somewhere - it might be interesting to either link to that or do something similar here. All these different accents are probably more easily understood heard than described!
    Look into my avatar. Look deep into my avatar...

  7. #107
    Priestess Of Syrinx Katsuni's Avatar
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    I've been told I don't have an accent, that I sound like I'm from 3 different cities in the states, and I've been told that I speak 'proper' english, pronounced like it should be in the dictionary with minimal noticible accent.

    I have no idea, honestly, I'd call my accent generic, if nothing else. My words are generally clearly pronounced and accurate, but I also stumble on words alot due to not doing much speaking in life until the last few years, so my speech isn't quite as refined as many peoples... which generally means a lack of noticible accent since I haven't really had time to develop one.

    Nearly typical canadian works, I suppose... minus the stereotypical crap like "aboot" instead of "about". There's no southern american drawl, no cockney brittish or aussie hints, neither german nor russian overtones, honestly I have no idea how to describe it, and as far as I can tell, noone else has been able to yet either XD

    Some have said "oh yeu have an accent... I just have no idea whot to call it" XD

    It's a rather light one anyway due to stunted development, is my guess, so it's enough to pass as generic whotever.

    ...Oddly enough, I think my typing on this post has a thicker accent from my spelling than my actual voice does XD

  8. #108
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    I have a rather typical Californian accent, not to be confused with the exaggerated surfer / valley girl stereotype of a CA accent. It's something like the generic American TV accent with a west coast twist here & there. There's a certain "rhythm" to a Californian's speech that makes it subtly different from the standard US accent. Although, to a non-American, it probably all sounds the same. I possibly modify it in the sense that in more formal settings I may try and ditch the CA flavor, but it's not even conscious....

    People in different states usually know I am from SoCal, but that partly has to do with how I look (or so I've been told).

    I can't understand some Southern US accents that sound like mumbling. I dislike the majority of them also, as well as New Jersey & New York accents.

    As for foreign accents, any individuals who mumble and speak very quickly (but not clearly) can be hard to understand.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

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  9. #109
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    Americans have extricated "t"s from most of our language as a remnant of the revolution.

    I's nawd uh problem fer understandin', jus' a strange quirk.
    Hm, I don't think I do that....I will say that my Ts are not as differentiated from Ds as a British person's, but I think there is some distinction ("not" & "nod" do NOT sound the same from my mouth), and I definitely do not drop Ts. For example, I hate when people say "inneresting" instead of "inTeresting".
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  10. #110
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    A lot of British speakers, particularly if they favour the variety of English known as Estuary, or the london speech from which it's derived, have actually largely done away with the hard "T" sound in favour of a sort of nasalised glottal stop.
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