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Thread: Accents

  1. #91
    As Long As It Takes.... Redbone's Avatar
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    Old-school, coastal Southern accent, non-rhotic speaker.

    If I get very upset, excited, or you overhear me talking to my family (especially my sisters), you may have trouble understanding me. Otherwise, you're hear very little of that accent--most people ask me where I'm from--they have no idea that I'm right at where I started. Y'all'll nevah heah me use it!

    Oddly enough, none of my kids have a Southern accent!
    I believe it's dying out.

  2. #92
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by compulsiverambler View Post
    Rs are harder to pronounce than most English consonants, I think, it's quite a common one to have a speech impediment with.

    I'm incapable of making an R sound immediately before another consonant because my own accent is non-rhotic, which means we only pronounce them just before vowels. I can't pronounce the R in 'cart' or 'farm' properly, it sounds like I've had to force it out with great effort.

    Something I find interesting is that Americans sound like they have to force out unflapped Ts in words like 'stutter' when they attempt a British accent. Just like my problem, they can kind of do it but it sounds awkward and disfluent somehow, even though the same sound in any other position is no trouble at all.

    I suppose it's the specific change from one tongue position into the other that the brain hasn't learned to do in these situations, even though each tongue position itself is easy.
    Yea those "T's" are really difficult when you are walking around using "D" instead, or just skipping them all together

    Studder, ineresting.. or my favorite, (my cousins and I do a lot) is to pronounce "mitten" like "mi-en"
    06/13 10:51:03 five sounds: you!!!
    06/13 10:51:08 shortnsweet: no you!!
    06/13 10:51:12 shortnsweet: go do your things and my things too!
    06/13 10:51:23 five sounds: oh hell naw
    06/13 10:51:55 shortnsweet: !!!!
    06/13 10:51:57 shortnsweet: (cries)
    06/13 10:52:19 RiftsWRX: You two are like furbies stuck in a shoe box

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  3. #93
    RETIRED CzeCze's Avatar
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    I have a 'Standard US News Reporter' accent with maybe a slight Californian inflection. I speak really fast. Some people have told me they don't understand what I'm saying bc I talk so fast or that it took time to adjust. Those that are used to my fast-speech or have fast-ears tell me I articulate very clearly.
    “If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you.” ― Oscar Wilde

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  4. #94
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by compulsiverambler View Post
    For some reason, to English ears, the New Zealand accent sounds like a posher version of the Australian accent. When I first listen to someone from the area, my first clue as to whether they're from New Zealand or Australia (if they haven't used any words with the vowel in 'bed' or 'met' yet) is whether their speech strikes me as slightly higher class or maybe uptight as opposed to outgoing and informal. And the New Zealand accent is the only one slightly hard to understand when fast, as you say.

    The most difficult to understand naturalised English accent to me, apart from some of the most obscure regional ones, is South African, partly because I rarely hear it. It sounds like no other accent I know of, which is probably also why. I like it a lot now that I can understand it though.
    I guess the NZ accent could sound somewhat posher than the Australian to the English. We speak with very clipped vowels, where Australians tend to elongate and drawl theirs more. When it comes to distinguishing between the two it really does depend on how broad the accent is. However, there are a couple of easy ways to tell the difference. The joke amongst Kiwis and Aussies is the way each says fish and chips. Aussies say we say fush and chups (although f'sh and ch'ps is closer) and we accuse them of saying feesh and cheeps. The other obvious words are dance (Australians say it closer to the Americans, and NZ says dahnce) and six (with both sides claiming they other says sex - Australian: seex, NZ: s'x)

    No, South African English tends to be very easy to understand, it sounds like Australian mixed with a Dutch twang. However, attempting to make sense of Africaaners (ie. non-English speaking white South Africans) when they speak English can be a very difficult exercise...

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Foriegners never understand my midlands accent. Actually, most native speakers don't undrstand me either. In fact it's probably just me they don't understand, rather than the accent.
    I love midlands accents. I have a brummy friend and I just love how she says "see ya la'ar!" I don't think I ever found it difficult to understand, but then you say yours is a little different...

  5. #95
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    You can tell the Maryland accent from the O-fronting (hard to describe in print, but it subtly shades the "o" in "show" toward "ew") and the blurring of Ls into Ws and Ts into Ds. So the name of the city to a native is "Bawdamore" rather than "Baltimore."
    The L-to-W thing is also a feature of Cockney English, although Cockneys also pronounce L in quite a range of other ways depending on the context. I wonder, were the first Maryland settlers from the London area?

  6. #96
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by compulsiverambler View Post
    Something I find interesting is that Americans sound like they have to force out unflapped Ts in words like 'stutter' when they attempt a British accent. Just like my problem, they can kind of do it but it sounds awkward and disfluent somehow, even though the same sound in any other position is no trouble at all.

    I suppose it's the specific change from one tongue position into the other that the brain hasn't learned to do in these situations, even though each tongue position itself is easy.
    Americans have extricated "t"s from most of our language as a remnant of the revolution.

    I's nawd uh problem fer understandin', jus' a strange quirk.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  7. #97
    Rainy Day Member Ingrid in grids's Avatar
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    I have an Australian accent. I get told by foreigners that it's a 'mild' one, but I think they just mean I don't sound like Steve Irwin.

  8. #98
    Senior Member swordpath's Avatar
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    I pretty much have no accent. I wish I had a Boston, Australian or British accent though.

  9. #99
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by compulsiverambler View Post
    What's yours? How do people in different areas react to it? Which ones do you like and dislike and which ones are you aware of having stereotypes about? Any you can't understand? Do you ever modify your accent and why? Etcetera etcetera.

    Mine's known as the Estuary accent because it originated around the Thames estuary. Now it's spread across the South East. It's basically something between Received Pronunciation and cockney (so avoids being either 'too posh' or 'too common') and might become the new English RP eventually because it's spreading so far. It would be the first time a non-upper class accent will have been the standard, non-regional accent of England, and some of the upper classes aren't happy about that. I've heard people call it 'lazy' speech but that doesn't make sense as the RP accent is non-rhotic (they drop a lot of Rs) so surely that's also lazy, in comparison to for example the South West regional accents, which I bet they wouldn't want to become the non-regional standard either. It's just snobbery. The person most internationally famous with an Estuary accent I can think of is David Beckham, so just think of how he speaks.
    Cockney is all right. I understand it.
    My mobile "rings" all the time. There is a man or a woman selling something.
    The callers do not speak a variety of accents.
    They all speak one and the same accent. Why?

    1. It is one and the same accent.
    2. The accent is incomprehensible.

    Why?
    It is because of the economic situation.
    What has the economic situation to do with accent?
    Everything.

    Depression does not undermine class society.
    The rich get richer. The poor get poorer.
    Wait. My mobile rings ..

  10. #100
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    "Everyone understand, we get luck on the side !"

    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaM4zb8Kwws"].[/YOUTUBE]
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

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