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View Poll Results: Ni Dom Users: Which best describes your beliefs about God?

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  • INTJ: I believe there is a God

    8 14.29%
  • INTJ: I am agnostic, but believe there's a >50% chance that some kind of Divinity exists

    1 1.79%
  • INTJ: I am agnostic, but believe there's a 50-50 chance that some kind of Divinity exists

    3 5.36%
  • INTJ: I am agnostic, but believe there's a <50% chance that some kind of Divinity exists

    5 8.93%
  • INTJ: I believe there is no God

    15 26.79%
  • INFJ: I believe there is a God

    9 16.07%
  • INFJ: I am agnostic, but believe there's a >50% chance that some kind of Divinity exists

    2 3.57%
  • INFJ: I am agnostic, but believe there's a 50-50 chance that some kind of Divinity exists

    4 7.14%
  • INFJ: I am agnostic, but believe there's a <50% chance that some kind of Divinity exists

    5 8.93%
  • INFJ: I believe there is no God

    4 7.14%
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Results 61 to 70 of 140

  1. #61
    Senior Member Harold Saxon's Avatar
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    There most certainly is a God: me. Oh, you mean a deity? No, the existence of supernatural deities is highly improbable.

    EDIT: Damn it, I selected the wrong poll option accidentally. I had meant to click "agnostic, less than 50% chance that there is some sort of divinity," rather than "greater than." I'm of the weak atheist opinion, myself - unless there comes conclusive proof of the existence of divinity, it is most rational to live as though there is none.

  2. #62
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    I believe in God. It's difficult to explain why, because it's very Ni/Fi, and does not translate into Te very well. I had a difficult time arriving at this belief, mostly because of the very "SJ" approach of religion, that you have to have bread and wine and oil and an alter and a cross and songs and ... you get the idea.

    What I've discovered, though, is that just by saying "God", I am able to connect and make statements about human spirituality and truths so intangible as to defy explanation, and do so clearly and concisely, as long as the other party believes in God.

    If the other party does not believe in God, I have to come up with an agnostic version of the same, and the translation isn't nearly so good.

    Here's an example. Let's say someone says that they find difficulty loving themselves. If they believe in God, I can pull out a couple of 2000-year-old truths that they already know by heart and remind them. They immediately find comfort and understanding, without having to breach a seriously abstract philosophical discussion.

    If they don't believe in God, it's a lot harder to communicate the same very true idea. There's a large repository of spiritual knowledge bound up in religion. To disregard religion and figure it all out for yourself is a monumental task.

    Me, I went through the seriously philosophical and abstract route, discovering truths "on my own," only to learn, "wait, it already says so, here ... wtf? ..." upon reading the same thing in scripture.

    To me, debates about religion sound like people arguing whether the truth is better depicted in claymation or CGI.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Saxon View Post
    There most certainly is a God: me. Oh, you mean a deity? No, the existence of supernatural deities is highly improbable.

    EDIT: Damn it, I selected the wrong poll option accidentally. I had meant to click "agnostic, less than 50% chance that there is some sort of divinity," rather than "greater than." I'm of the weak atheist opinion, myself - unless there comes conclusive proof of the existence of divinity, it is most rational to live as though there is none.
    I would have to disagree...

    I mean, take Pascal's wager -- it's far more rational than your belief...

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    There's a large repository of spiritual knowledge bound up in religion. To disregard religion and figure it all out for yourself is a monumental task.

    Me, I went through the seriously philosophical and abstract route, discovering truths "on my own," only to learn, "wait, it already says so, here ... wtf? ..." upon reading the same thing in scripture.
    Word.

    The truth is: you don't appreciate all that's in there, unless you go and actually do all the hard lifting yourself.

    Unless you're an ESFJ. Then you're just happy believing whatever you're told (although, to be completely honest, it's more complex than that, and there's some kinda wisdom behind their "simplicity". )

  5. #65
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    Starting to get enough data to make some conclusions...

  6. #66
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    And so it's clear, there should be only one vote under "INFJ: Agnostic, <50%" and one vote under "INFJ: Atheist" (as of the time of this post), as neither SillySapienne nor Tater Typhoon (unless he's willing to make the plunge and call himself a veritable INFJ) should have voted in the poll.

  7. #67
    AKA Nunki Polaris's Avatar
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    I can no longer answer this poll, because none of those options describe my beliefs. If I were to make one that fits them, it would be something like "I believe there's a 'God,' but there is no 'God.'"
    [ Ni > Ti > Fe > Fi > Ne > Te > Si > Se ][ 4w5 sp/sx ][ RLOAI ][ IEI-Ni ]

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nunki View Post
    I can no longer answer this poll, because none of those options describe my beliefs. If I were to make one that fits them, it would be something like "I believe there's a 'God,' but there is no 'God.'"
    Would you mind expanding on that?

    FYI, for the purpose of this poll, I wanted to leave the definition of God extremely open. It need not be the God of this or that religion, but whatever concept of divinity you believe in, so long as you consider it in some sense Divine.

  9. #69
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    While not my composition, Michael Shermer's essay nicely summarizes my stance on the matter:

    In the beginning — specifically on October 23, 4004 B.C., at noon — out of quantum foam fluctuation God created the Big Bang. The bang was followed by cosmological inflation. God saw that the Big Bang was very big, too big for creatures that could worship him, so He created the earth. And darkness was upon the face of the deep, so He commanded hydrogen atoms (which He created out of Quarks and other subatomic goodies) to fuse and become helium atoms and in the process release energy in the form of light. And the light maker he called the sun, and the process He called fusion. And He saw the light was good because now He could see what he was doing. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

    And God said, Let there be lots of fusion light makers in the sky. Some of these fusion makers appear to be more than 4,004 light years from Earth. In fact, some of the fusion makers He grouped into collections He called galaxies, and these appeared to be millions and even billions of light years from Earth, so He created “tired light” — light that slows down through space — so that the 4004 B.C. creation myth might be preserved. And created He many wondrous splendors, including Red Giants, White Dwarfs, Quasars, Pulsars, Nova and Supernova, Worm Holes, and even Black Holes out of which nothing can escape. But since God cannot be constrained by nothing (can God make a planet so big that he could not lift it?), He created Hawking radiation through which information can escape from Black Holes. This made God even more tired than tired light, and the evening and the morning were the second day.

    And God said, Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together unto one place, and let the continents drift apart by plate tectonics. He decreed sea floor spreading would create zones of emergence, and He caused subduction zones to build mountains and cause earthquakes. In weak points in the crust God created volcanic islands, where the next day He would place organisms that were similar to but different from their relatives on the continents, so that still later created creatures called humans would mistake them for evolved descendants. And in the land God placed fossil fuels, natural gas, and other natural resources for humans to exploit, but not until after Day Six. And the evening and the morning were the third day.

    And God saw that the land was lonely, so He created animals bearing their own kind, declaring Thou shalt not evolve into new species, and thy equilibrium shall not be punctuated. And God placed into the land’s strata, fossils that appeared older than 4004 B.C. And the sequence resembled descent with modification. And the evening and morning were the fourth day.

    And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creatures that hath life, the fishes. And God created great whales whose skeletal structure and physiology were homologous with the land mammals he would create later that day. Since this caused confusion in the valley of the shadow of doubt God brought forth abundantly all creatures, great and small, declaring that microevolution was permitted, but not macroevolution. And God said, “Natura non facit saltum” — Nature shall not make leaps. And the evening and morning were the fifth day.

    And God created the pongidids and hominids with 98 percent genetic similarity, naming two of them Adam and Eve, who were anatomically fully modern humans. In the book in which God explained how He did all this, in chapter one He said he created Adam and Eve together out of the dust at the same time, but in chapter two He said He created Adam first, then later created Eve out of one of Adam’s ribs. This caused further confusion in the valley of the shadow of doubt, so God created Bible scholars and theologians to argue the point.

    And in the ground placed He in abundance teeth, jaws, skulls, and pelvises of transitional fossils from pre-Adamite creatures. One he chose as his special creation He named Lucy. And God realized this was confusing, so he created paleoanthropologists to sort it out. And just as He was finishing up the loose ends of the creation God realized that Adam’s immediate descendants who lived as farmers and herders would not understand inflationary cosmology, global general relativity, quantum mechanics, astrophysics, biochemistry, paleontology, population genetics, and evolutionary theory, so He created creation myths. But there were so many creation stories throughout the land that God realized this too was confusing, so he created anthropologists, folklorists, and mythologists to settle the issue.

    By now the valley of the shadow of doubt was overrunneth with skepticism, so God became angry, so angry that God lost His temper and cursed the first humans, telling them to go forth and multiply (but not in those words). They took God literally and 6,000 years later there are six billion humans. And the evening and morning were the sixth day.

    By now God was tired, so God said, “Thank me its Friday,” and He made the weekend.

    It was a good idea.

  10. #70
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    Don't believe, no evidence.

    Even if something big and stuff appeared in front of me and claimed to be God, I'd just say 'who made you?', then something bigger would appear and I'd say 'who made you?' and I'd keep going till I die then so I can never be convinced. I can't comprehend God so even if he was following me around he wouldn't really exist to me.

    Don't believe in afterlife because souls don't have brains and memories and there's no oxygen in heaven anyway.

    [YOUTUBE=zOfjkl-3SNE]god[/YOUTUBE] This video kinda has the same theme for part of my disbelief too

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