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Thread: The bear test

  1. #1
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Smile The bear test

    Description: This test works best if you are able to visualize the environment before looking at the available choices. If what you imagine does not precisely fit any of the choices provided, choose one that makes you ‘feel’ about the same as what you visualized (if the choices don’t match what you see, then go with what gives you the same general gut-feeling).

    Make sure you have a pen and paper handy
    __________________________________________________ _________

    1.
    You awake one morning and find yourself in an odd yet familiar room. Describe the room. Is it warm or cold? What kind of furnishings and decorations are there?

    2.
    Do you want to leave the room?
    --a. yes, leave room
    --b. No, I want to stay
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++

    3.
    If you picked a:
    Interested in what’s outside, you somehow manage to get out of the room and you find yourself on a trail leading into a forest.

    If you picked b:
    You want to stay, but the room dissolves around you and suddenly you find yourself on a trail leading into a forest.
    -----

    Describe the forest first. What kind of trees are there? Is it bright or dark?
    -----

    Now, describe the path in relation to the forest. Is it easily navigated or are there lots of obstructions? Is it wide or narrow? Well-traveled or abandoned? Clearly marked or barely visible?
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++

    4.
    Following the path for some time, you find it ends against some moving water. Describe it. What kind of a body of water is it? What is the water itself like?

    -----
    Do you try to cross it or go around it?

    --a. cross it (bridge, ford, wade across)
    --b. walk around it
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++

    5.
    If you chose a:
    You successfully get over the water and find where the path continues on the other side.

    If you chose b:
    Fortunately, you are able to get around the water and find where the path continues on the other side.
    -----
    Strangely enough, someone has left a drinking vessel on the bank here. Describe the cup or flask.

    Do you take the cup or leave it?
    --a. take it with you
    --b. leave it behind

    -----

    If you chose a (take cup):
    Do you fill it or leave it empty?
    --c. fill it.
    --d. leave it empty.

    If you chose b, progress to part 6.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++
    6.
    After that, you continue to walk along. In the middle of the path you find, of all things, a key.

    Describe the key. What do you think it unlocks?
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++

    7.
    Finally feeling comfortable with this strange world, you follow the path back into the forest. Unfortunately, there’s a big grizzly bear standing right in the middle of the path, blocking any further movement in that direction! The bear has obviously seen you, but seems to be letting you make the first move.

    What do you do? Do you confront the bear or get off the trail and avoid it?
    --a. confront the bear
    --b. avoid the bear.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++

    8.
    The trail suddenly comes to an abrupt end here, against a tall wall of stone. The wall seemingly goes off forever in each direction; you cannot tell because of the thin mist that permeates the forest here. Climbing over it is an option; the problem there is that it definitely looks like a one-way trip.

    What do you do? Do you return the way you came, try to go around the wall, or jump over the wall?
    --a. go back the way you came.
    --b. go around the wall
    --c. jump over the wall.
    __________________________________________________ ______________

    This has been a relational psychology test.
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    Now for the results.

    1. the first room.
    The initial room is the subject’s childhood. What interests us here is the general atmosphere of the room, in addition to the level of furnishings described by the subject.


    If the items in the room are given an average description, that tells us that the subject has normal memories of childhood. Extremely inviting surroundings of the room (Example: saying that it is Christmas Time), suggest a childhood filled with joy. An uncomfortable room suggests a childhood that was devoid of happiness.

    If there are no furnishings at all, this tells us of either a complete absence of memories from that time or active suppression of said memories. An example of a room that has this description would be: "It's cold, there are four white walls and one chair in the corner. It's a regular wooden straight backed chair"

    The depth of description tells us that the subject has strong memories of childhood (paragraph long descriptions of the room.)

    For example, a description like “a brown couch, yellow painted walls, and a dog” is a weak description witch indicates a poor recollection of childhood. A description like this, for example, “I am laying on a brown cloth covered couch with my head on the arm-rest. I am looking up and I can see the sound-insulating-ceiling-popcorn characteristic of poorer houses built in the 70’s. The plastic ceiling fan has a fake wood texture and is making a low humming noise. A young looking Siberian Husky sleeping beside the couch, and, and, and- ” is a stronger description.

    Basic description of furnishings and their meanings:

    • Bare, empty room = complete absence of memories of childhood.
    • Sparingly decorated (ex: 1 couch, 1 TV, nothing else) = few memories
    • Average = normal amount of memories.
    • Reasonably decorated (ex: couch, chair, TV, paintings, shelves, books, coffee tables)= strong memories.
    • Detailed= Rich lasting memories of childhood.


    The present’s of instruments (like guitars, violins, toy piano keyboards) may indicate an interest in music as a child. If there is a feeling of resentment or fear towards that instrument, it may indicate that the subject was forced to practice playing music and hated it.

    Note: A conflicting statement like: "the temperature is warm, yet oddly draining due to the thermal properties of the stone room and its marble and cold glass furnishings" is not a good sign. That the room is superficially warm suggests that the subject pretended to have a happy childhood even though it was not.

    Note: If the furnishings are old and faded, this may mean that the subject’s memories have washed-out with time.

    Note: this room does not have to look anything like any room you’ve ever been in- you could describe a room from “Alice in wonderland.” Doing so, however, indicates that you spent a lot of time daydreaming or reading stories. (If you described a fanciful place, that indicates that one of your ‘Meyers-Briggs preferences’ is iNtuition [but I'm not sure])
    .................................................. ...........................................

    Emotional description of room.
    If this room is comfortable, that suggests that the subject had a pleasant childhood. If the subject describes feeling ill, sad, scared, angry, envious, etc. in the room, that tells us that the childhood was not smooth enough to be satisfactory. A description like “I am intrigued and a little excited, but also a little scared” indicates that the subject may have been a fearful child (clingy), but didn’t have too much going wrong in his/her life.

    Using odd phrasing such as “teperature is between hot and cold” rather than the more succinct “warm” could suggest a childhood that bounced between tragic and wonderful.

    Basic description of comfort levels and their meanings:

    • Hellish = traumatic childhood
    • Uncomfortable = a childhood devoid of happiness.
    • Average = a bland, uninspiring childhood.
    • Comfortable = childhood was pleasant
    • Heavenly = childhood was filled with joy.


    Note! The more inviting the room sounds, the less you want to leave it. Describing an absolute euphoric scene (and not wanting to leave it) indicates that you have little comfort in adulthood and have a tendency to fantasize about your childhood. If this is the case, this first room will seem less appealing the more your current life improves.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    If the subject wanted to leave the room, he/she wanted to become an adult.
    Wanting to stay in the room indicates an unwillingness to grow up.

    Note! Liking the first room but still choosing to leave indicates a perfectly healthy transition between childhood and adolescence. If you said something like “boy, this room is great, but I want to see what’s in the next one.” indicates a lack of knowledge about adult hood, but still a willingness to explore it. Being able to see a glimpse of what lay outside (window, open door) indicates a knowledge (or supposed knowledge) of what adulthood is like.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. the forest.
    The forest is growing up, and the trees are those adults with whom the subject interacted at that time. A semi-dark forest tells us that the subject felt somewhat oppressed by the attention the adults gave. Small trees imply that the adults had a weak influence on the subject. A well-lit forest tells us that the subject had considerable freedom at this time. Average-sized trees imply the normal influence adults have on a child: neither insignificant nor impressive.

    Thick or tall trees indicate that the subject was dominated by adults at the time. Knobby, overlapping tree roots (over which, you have to walk) indicate painful or uneasy progression threw this. If you described your shoes wearing down, your feet becoming sore, or considerable effort it took not to trip or loose your balance, then the dominating adults were making life unhappy.

    Stunted, damaged, or absent trees imply a dearth of adult interaction with the subject.

    Basic descriptions of the trees and what they mean:

    • Stunted, short trees = lack of interaction with the subject.
    • Small trees = the adults had a weak influence on the subject.
    • Average = average influence.
    • Large = adults had strong influence on you.
    • Giant = adults had a significant influence on you.


    If your forest also has low shrubs (ivy, brush), this often represent adults that were only passively involved in the subject’s life. (neighbor, visiting uncle)

    Note! How dense was the forest? If the trees crowding together, it means that the subject had many adults influencing his life (parents, teachers, older siblings). If the forest is lightly wooded or airy, this indicates a smaller number of adults influencing the subject’s life (perhaps the many teachers you had had little influence on you.)

    Basic descriptions of the level of light in the forest and what they mean:

    • Dark = oppressed by the attentions. Crushed by the weight of their demands.
    • Dusky = somewhat oppressed by the adults.
    • Average = received enough attention to be guided, but not oppressed.
    • Reasonably Lit = Adults gave you considerable freedom while you were growing up
    • Bright = you had excessive freedom growing up.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    3. Path leading to the forest.
    Adolescence is represented by the path through the forest. A narrow path suggests that the subject had limited options for emotional growth at this time. Poor visibility of the path tells us the subject was often confused by the changes brought on by adolescence. The lack of evidence of fellow travelers (thin trail, obstructing boulders that have not been dealt with) suggests strong feelings of isolation at that time. If plants are the major source of obstruction, this tells us that the subject’s problems arose mostly from interactions with adults.

    A wide path indicates that the subject had numerous options for emotional growth at this time. The visibility of the path tells us that the subject had a good idea of what to expect from adolescence. The strong evidence of fellow travelers (clean road, well swept, paved) tells us that the subject received a lot of support from friends and family during that potentially troubling time. If the path is free of obstructions, this indicates that the subject had no problems during adolescence.

    Being able to see all the path indicates that the subject knew exactly what he/she could expect from adulthood. If the road is only slightly obscured (for example, if the path rims the bottom of a shallow hill, and the top of the hill hides just a tiny bit of the road), this indicates a pretty good, but not exact, idea of what adulthood would hold.

    If the path occasionally narrows, it suggests periods of limited choices.

    If the path appears to have been once heavily used but now abandoned, it tells us that the subject felt isolated only in the later stages of adolescence.

    Basic analysis of path:

    • Visible path = good idea of what to expect in adolescence.
    • Obscure path = confused by the changes brought on by adolescence.
    • Wide path = Had numerous options for emotional growth.
    • Narrow path = Had limited options for emotional growth
    • Frequently used path = Received a lot of support from friends and family
    • Infrequently used path = Strong feelings of isolation at that time.
    • No obstruction in path = Had no problems during adolescence.
    • Trees obstructing the path = Problems arose mostly from interactions with adults.
    • Some obstructions on the path = Occasional problem in adolescence
    • Many obstructions on the path = Many problems during adolescence.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    3.
    The water is the subject’s sexuality. What interests us here is the clarity of the water (representing attitude) and its movement (representing libido). Murky, dirty, or otherwise unclear water suggests that the subject has significant issues regarding sex. Clear water tells us that the subject has no issues regarding sex. Slow, gently moving water suggests a passive, restrained, calm sex drive. Stagnant or still water suggests a sex drive that is absent or pathologically inactive, not by choice of the subject. Fast-moving water indicates a strong, active sex drive.

    A streem that bubbles may indicate an average if somewhat playful sex drive.


    Basic description of the water and what it means:
    • Water is stagnant = A sex drive that is absent or pathologically inactive.
    • Water movement is Gentle = A passive, restrained, calm sex drive.
    • Water movement is Average = A normal, average sex drive.
    • Water movement is Fast = A strong, active sex drive.
    • Water movement is Rapid = A powerful, vigorous, compulsive sex drive.
    • Water is clear = Has no issues regarding sex.
    • Water is murky = Has significant issues regarding sex.
    • Life (fish/frogs) in water is present = A strong desire for children.
    • Life (fish/frogs) in water is absent = A normal desire for child.


    Crossing the water (wading threw, swimming) means that you are open to having new sexual experiences. Avoiding “getting your feet wet” means that you aren’t as open to new sexual experiences.

    If you find that your streem is skinny, such that you can easilly step over it without getting wet, think about what kind of interaction you had with the water (washing your face, drinking, splashing at the water with your hand.) In the case when your streem is small, the more water you touched the more sexual interest you have.

    (thank GemPoPGem for telling me I forgot to include the part about crossing the water. )


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    4. The cup or flask.

    The vessel, or specifically the practicality of the vessel, is how the subject approaches marriage or bonding. A practical container indicates that the subject is pragmatic when it comes to questions of marriage. A decorative container indicates that the subject views marriage as a romantic adventure. A container that is both practical and decorative indicates that the subject considers both the practical and the romantic sides of marriage. The subject who, when given the chance to see something useful or beautiful about marriage, sees a piece of trash (unusable, unclean, unsightly) then he/she views marrage as something along the lines of a meaningless gesture with no positive outcome.

    A practical cup is one where the cup won’t likely spill its contender if you give it a gentle tap. A cup described as having a wide base bottom, a soda bottle with an intact screw-on cap, a thermos, or a canteen is considered practical. Generally, these cups are made of sturdy materials like wood, plastic, metal, or glass.

    A decorative cup (unpractical) is one where the container is bejeweled, decorated with ribbons, cut attractively (wine glasses are sometimes cut with a spiral pattern), utilitized with rich stained wood, painted, engraved, etc. A decorative cup is never feasible in an adventuring, foresting, or critical situation. Basically, if the cup is gaudy, then it’s likely to get broken. Examples are: wine glasses, shallow bowls, a cup sewn togheter from leaves.

    A container that is both decorative and practical indicates that the subject considers both romantic and pragmatic aspects of marriage. Describing someting like a tea cup, apainted clay pot, a novelty star-wars collecter's cup, or a cup made out of some precious material like gold or

    A short, smart-ass answer (example: “it’s a nuclear wessel” [Startrek reference]) indicates that the subject views marriage as kind of a joke (or is currently having a bad day).

    a rather unusual vessel (computer cabless weived together, cup shaped like a treasure chest), suggests a strong sense of whimsy about the institution of marriage

    That the cup is stained and dirty suggests a superficial cynicism about the institution.

    When a subject refuses to describe something, it usually suggests problems with that aspect of life that he or she is trying to suppress. If you said something like "I know nothing about this cup," without even offering what color it is, something may be wrong in the subjects' marrage/subjects' perrents' marrage.

    Damage to the container (such as having the lether strap on a metal canteen break) suggests cynicism about the institution; in this case, the broken strap suggests more that the subject may find it difficult personally to “carry” a marriage.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Taking the cup indicates that you are interested in marriage. Filling the cup means that not only are you interested in marriage, but that sex will be a significant part of that relationship. Taking the bottle and leaving it empty means that sex isn’t important to you.

    Leaving it all together means that you are not interested in marrage.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Key's use

    The key is the ideal career for the subject. What interests us here is how the key appears (representing how others view the career) and what it may open (representing the subject’s goals for the career).

    Keys that allow access to treasure or other valuable things indicate that the subject is fixated on gaining wealth through a career. This appls if keeping the key in your posesion (like wearing it like a necklace) alows a hidden and magical part of the forest to open up (without you having to use it on a lock).

    Keys to palaces, castles, and other fortifications are normally indicative of a desire for power.

    Indicating that the key accesses something along the path (the subject’s history) suggests that a career is to solve a life-problem

    If you said something like "the key opens secret rooms that are filled with people's favorite things" leads me to believe that the subject is (or wishes to be) self-less. Having the key open the secret rooms of others' is a more difficult concept to analyze, however. Please forgive me if I'm wrong. Perhaps it suggests that the subject wants to use the career to get to know others well, that is, a socially interactive job.

    Keys to diaries, hope chests, or other highly personal items suggest that the subject wants a career that will solve other people’s problems.

    Decorative keys suggest that the subject wants an attention-grabbing, one-of-a-kind career. If you inclued words like “pioneer” in your description of the key, this may suggest that you expect to forge new ground with the career.

    Magical or fantastic keys suggest that the subject has unreasonably high expectations of what will result from a career.

    Old-fashioned keys suggest that the subject desires a traditional career.

    An ordinary-looking key suggests that the subject desires a nondescript career. Having the key open a house, car, or other commonplace use tells us that the subject has no extraordinary expectations about a career.

    Versatile keys tell us that the subject has numerous but unfocused expectations about a career.

    If your key is a key to a jewelry box, it can also be viewed as a symbol of emotional fulfillment.

    Having it open a private garden suggests that the subject is expecting the career to provide personal enrichment.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The key's look
    The key is the ideal career for the subject. What interests us here is how the key appears (representing how others view the career)

    a key that is tarnished and worted with knobs of rust indicate that you believe that others see your career as old, out-dated, hill-billyish, etc.

    A key that is beautiful indicates a highly desirable carrier.

    A key that is heavy indicates that other's see the career as difficult.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The bear:
    The bear represents danger and how you approach it.

    If you confronted the bear, that indicates that In a crisis, the you prefer the direct, no-nonsense approach to solving major problems.

    If you avoided the bear, In a crisis, you prefer the indirect, non-confrontational approach.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Wall
    The wall represents death.

    By jumping over it, the subject not only acknowledges death but has come to accept its finality. you don't entertain ideas that death (represented by the wall) will end if you simply circle around it.

    by trying to walk around it, the subject shows an acknowledgment of death, but also a need for an alternative to its finality, such as an afterlife or reincarnation.

    by avoiding it altogether, the subject shows complete denial about the possibility of death.
    ================================================== =======================
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    Well, I hope you liked it. But... Take your results with a grain of salt.
    Last edited by ObeyBunny; 03-24-2010 at 01:31 AM. Reason: Finnished

  2. #2
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    Interesting...

    And way to go with leaving people hanging. *taps feet*



  3. #3
    Let me count the ways Betty Blue's Avatar
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    ObeyBunny! I was really enjoying that, i fully focused on all of it...
    Wheres the end?
    (p.s you need to include the answer part with how you got across the water)
    "We knew he was someone who had a tragic flaw, that's where his greatness came from"

  4. #4
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Sorry, my mom came in and found that I wasn't doing my homework. I had to either submit it right away or not at all.

    I'll probobly have time to continue the rest on Friday afternoon, March 12, 2010.

    Untill then, keep track of what you thought of the key, bear, and wall.
    I hope you enjoy the Relational Psychology test.

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    Good thing I saved my answers in an open office document...

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    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    Interesting, it's almost completely opposite the truth for me. I'm not trying to be difficult, I swear...
    -end of thread-

  7. #7
    Senior Member mr.awesome's Avatar
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    dangit i left the cup behind :[ haha thats strange.. i suppose this kinda thing really uproots your 'iceberg' if you guys are familiar to the iceberg theory. [and if you want to put any sort of faith into this kinda test at all anyway]
    as if i were to read the reasons behind the answers first it would be alot different... at least for the cup part. goodness. thats kinda a bummer.
    and supposedly i have a strong sex drive with significant issues towards sex. hahaha. i could see that.
    my etsy Morphochroma

    I know you think I'm crazy,
    but most people they can't tell.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Default What was wrong, maybe I could fix it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnity View Post
    Interesting, it's almost completely opposite the truth for me. I'm not trying to be difficult, I swear...
    I guess a test like this isn't bound to work for everyone, but I noticed some striking parallels when I first took the test.

    So... which parts were wrong, and in what way? Maybe I could fix the test to apply to more people.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ObeyBunny View Post
    I guess a test like this isn't bound to work for everyone, but I noticed some striking parallels when I first took the test.

    So... which parts were wrong, and in what way? Maybe I could fix the test to apply to more people.
    I don't think it's wrong...but give us the rest of the answers!

  10. #10
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    omfg i love it.

    so...waiting to respond until you're finished then?
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

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