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View Poll Results: Who has the "more" annoying accent?

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  • "posh" Cambridge accent

    10 12.20%
  • Cockney London accent

    11 13.41%
  • Scottish accent

    3 3.66%
  • Irish accent

    2 2.44%
  • Aussie accent

    10 12.20%
  • Canadian accent

    4 4.88%
  • Yankee accent (US)

    8 9.76%
  • Southern (Texan) accent (US)

    23 28.05%
  • Caribbean accent

    11 13.41%
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Results 91 to 100 of 291

  1. #91
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bananatrombones View Post
    To get back to the question, but not answer it.

    I find Irish accents very pleasant on the ear. Equally, some variants of Scots can be extremely soft and engaging, while others gutteral and profane. I don't think you can easily draw a line, as Blackmail! has.
    But yet, their histories and origins are very different, even if Scottish and Irish people had to live close to each other.

    For instance, the accent you may find in the Highlands may sound closer to the Irish accent, because they too were Gaels that were forced to learn English.

    But in the Lowlands, Scots became dominant more than a millenia ago. So that's a completely different accent. And Scots settlers came to Ulster, hence the current political mess created by old UK policies.
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

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  2. #92
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    Well...

    Metric system is supposed to be the greatest contribution of French academia to modern science.
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

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  3. #93
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    My favourite one is the Scottish accent, especially Glaswegian. I used to have such a crush on my film lecturer predominantly because of his Scottish accent.

    I can't say I absolutely hate any one accent, yet I do find a thick Aussie accent to be rather grating at times (as with a extremely posh English accent). Some are kinda ridiculous and hilarious (to my ears anyway) which leads me to mock them a bit but it doesn't result in any bias against them.

    Slightly OT, I've been told by friends that speak English as a second language that the New Zealand accent is the hardest for them to understand. However, this may be more to do with the fact that we mumble and talk way too fast. It also seems, Aussies exempt, completely impossible for people to imitate it properly - I've known non-New Zealanders that are fantastic at doing accents but can't get anywhere near a New Zealand accent.

  4. #94
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    New England accent = Irish/Italian influence

    New York Accent = I don't even know

    Southern Accent = Scot/Welsh/English influence

    Northern American = Scandinavian influence

    AAVE = Creole influence

    Everyone Else = German influence

    But... you know, whatever.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  5. #95
    Senior Member matmos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackmail! View Post
    But yet, their histories and origins are very different, even if Scottish and Irish people had to live close to each other.

    For instance, the accent you may find in the Highlands may sound closer to the Irish accent, because they too were Gaels that were forced to learn English.

    But in the Lowlands, Scots became dominant more than a millenia ago. So that's a completely different accent. And Scots settlers came to Ulster, hence the current political mess created by old UK policies.
    The word Sasanach - meaning, Little German - was originally an insult directed at Lowland Scots by Highlanders. Now it is directed against the English, who are thoroughly unworthy of the insult any more.

  6. #96
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    You're exposing your own biases here. English-English spelling is more similar to French than American-English spellings.
    Not entirely.

    US spelling is simpler, really, and faster to learn. It's also considerably less counter-intuitive than UK-English.

    And besides, it's US-English I have to use when I read a PhD thesis, when I have to write a paper or prepare a lecture for foreign (non-French) students.

    I've only become more accustomed to UK-English because of my frequent travels to Brussels, since it is one of the official languages of the European Commission, while US-English is not.

    My reasons are practical, you see?
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

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  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    New England accent = Irish/Italian influence

    New York Accent = I don't even know

    Southern Accent = Scot/Welsh/English influence

    Northern American = Scandinavian influence

    AAVE = Creole influence

    Everyone Else = German influence


    But... you know, whatever.
    Texas= Kitchen sink


    Do You Speak American . Sea to Shining Sea . American Varieties . Texan . Drawl | PBS

    The broadly defined “Texas accent” began to form, Bailey explained, when two populations merged here in the mid-nineteenth century. Settlers who migrated from Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi brought with them what would later become the Lower South Dialect (its drawl left an imprint on East Texas), while settlers from Tennessee and Kentucky brought with them the South Midland Dialect (its twang had a greater influence in West Texas).

    Added to the mix of Anglo settlers from the Deep South and Appalachia who began talking to each other was an established Spanish-speaking population and an influx of Mexican, German, and Czech immigrants. “What distinguishes a Texas accent the most is the confluence of its influences,” said Bailey.
    For New York, there's a movie from the 80s called "Revolution" with Al Pachino and his character speaks with a typical accent for someone in New York state in 1770s. It got bad reviews for the accent because people didn't understand what the movie maker was trying to do, to be realisitic.

  8. #98
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    When I first started watching Lost, I realized that the Australian and Southern states accents sound similar to me.

    I think Americans say "roof" funny. They sound like they're making dog noises.

    I'm from prairie Canada, 2000km away from Toronto--I don't understand what people mean when they say we say "aboot." I'm not sure if this means I'm very removed from it or I'm an offender myself.
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
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  9. #99
    Twerking & Lurking ayoitsStepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphosis View Post
    Also, I would like to point out that "Texan" is southern, but southern is not Texan. Someone from Texas speaks completely differently than someone from say...South Carolina. Twang vs. Drawl.
    And even one who lives in SOUTH Texas, has a completely different accent than someone in North, East or West Texas.

    edit: Oops, apparently it's been brought up already.
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGuffin View Post
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  10. #100
    Lallygag Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ayoitsStepho View Post
    And even one who lives in SOUTH Texas, has a completely different accent than someone in North, East or West Texas.
    Only to people who's ear will detect it as they are local.

    I believe I would be totally unable to tell them apart, even if I was told they were different, and heard them one after another.

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