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  1. #51
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bananatrombones View Post
    Come, come - you disappoint me. Using fallacious reasoning will get you nowhere. Have a butchers at this:

    Appeal to tradition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Why is there an appeal to tradition? I understand the fallacy but the appeal to tradition wouldn't be there in the first place if there wasn't a reason for it.

  2. #52
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teslashock View Post
    ExTJs (particularly ESTJs)

    Why don't we do a (rather inconclusive) study:

    Were you spanked as child?
    Which parent did the spanking?
    What was said parent's type?
    Yes, ESTJ mother. I mostly got spanked for "talking back"(openly disagreeing).
    I also got paddled at school at the age of 6, a couple of times when I was 8, and once when I was 10.
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  3. #53
    Senior Member matmos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    ...that is why it is done throughout the ages. Why do traditionalists still do such things?
    Appeal to tradition
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Appeal to tradition, also known as proof from tradition,[1] appeal to common practice, argumentum ad antiquitatem, false induction, or the "is/ought" fallacy,[2] is a common logical fallacy in which a thesis is deemed correct on the basis that it correlates with some past or present tradition. The appeal takes the form of "this is right because we've always done it this way."[3]

    An appeal to tradition essentially makes two assumptions:

    * The old way of thinking was proven correct when introduced. In actuality this may be false the tradition might be entirely based on incorrect grounds.
    * The past justifications for the tradition are still valid at present. In cases where circumstances have changed, this assumption may be false.

    Sorry you are unable to see your own faulty reasoning. And it is faulty. Oh yes it is.

  4. #54
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bananatrombones View Post
    Sorry you are unable to see your own faulty reasoning. And it is faulty. Oh yes it is.
    Meh. I must be getting confused. Yes, you are probably right. I'm screwing up my arguments.
    I'm off, so if you want my opinion: I am personally against spanking but I see why people use it. I was never spanked so I don't know what it's like. I prefer using mind games and tricks to get the kids to listen to me. Or simple treats that kids like.

    Me: Would you like a marshmellow?
    Kid: yes
    Me: I'll give it to you if you're good.
    Kid: ok

  5. #55
    Geolectric teslashock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    Why is there an appeal to tradition? I understand the fallacy but the appeal to tradition wouldn't be there in the first place if there wasn't a reason for it.
    You're practically using the appeal to tradition fallacy when you attempt to justify the appeal to tradition argument. Cool.

  6. #56
    Senior Member matmos's Avatar
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    Years ago, back in old Caledonia, we had a guy who was belted on a regular basis. He was a generally anti-social character and the more he was belted the more ready he was to use violence against almost everybody else. To compound matters he became thoroughly resistant to corporal punishment, on one occassion laughing at a teacher after being thrashed 6 times and glibly replying, "Is that your best shot" - and requesting another 6.

    He eventually got sent to some religious retreat, where people took the time to talk and exert other more civilized pressures. It worked and he made a real go at life - by talking.

    It's anecdotal, however, I'm fairly convinced without the therapy he'd have ended up in prison. The fact that 99 of his peers don't end up in prison (or homeless, on drugs, etc) still isn't a good argument.

    All the best, Katsuki. Time for the pub. There's a fight in the car park tonight /joke


  7. #57
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    Every child is convinced that they're a no good little brat. This is the way it is.
    I don't remember ever believing that about myself. I wasn't actually a no good little brat. I was pretty well behaved and always given affirmation that I was good and valuable and loved, even if I was occasionally spanked when I misbehaved.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  8. #58
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    I prefer using mind games and tricks to get the kids to listen to me.
    I prefer mind games too. Hitting kids is just not nearly as fun.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  9. #59
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    I don't remember ever believing that about myself. I wasn't actually a no good little brat. I was pretty well behaved and always given affirmation that I was good and valuable and loved, even if I was occasionally spanked when I misbehaved.
    You're lying.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  10. #60
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    You're lying.
    Well, then you must have a better memory of my childhood than I do.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

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