User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 68

  1. #11
    No Cigar Litvyak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,787

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dooraven View Post
    Spending time with others usually doesn't give you much time to think about world problems.
    ^ This is what I was talking about.

  2. #12
    Geolectric teslashock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Posts
    1,690

    Default

    Generally, extroverts appear happier, but that doesn't necessarily mean that they are. Extroverts are typically more concerned with their social reputations than are introverts, and most extroverts have the ability to pick up on the pattern that appearing happy enhances the capacity for a positive reputation within a primarily social context. This doesn't mean that extroverts actually are happy; their happy appearance can some times simply be attributed to their penchant for outward charm and charisma, regardless of what's actually going on internally for them.

    In other words, extroverts often rely on some form of external validation, and they realize that the best way to obtain this validation is by eliciting amicable social skills, so that's what they do. In some cases, extroverts desire this external validation because they have a decreased confidence in themselves that comes from within, and I'm willing to bet that in many cases, a lack of self-confidence is due to a lack of happiness.

    That's not to say that all extroverts are extroverts because they rely on external validation for generating their internal happiness. In many other cases, people are extroverted because they have a sense of confidence in their actions and ideas, so they have no shame in expressing themselves, and this confidence is indeed derived from happiness. But again, this is not the case for all extroverts.

    From the other end of the spectrum, a similar rationale can be applied to arguing that introversion is not necessarily a corollary to unhappiness. Some introverts do not need external validation for their actions and ideas; they have a natural self-confidence that comes from within. In many cases, introverts may appear aloof and apathetic to social interaction because they see no need for it; they make themselves happy enough.

    Now, just like I don't mean to imply that extroversion and happiness never correlate, I also don't mean to imply that introversion and happiness have a correlation under all circumstances. In other cases, introverts may be introverts because of a lack of confidence; they see the potential to be embarrassed in a majority of social contexts, so they often refrain from social interactions entirely. This apprehension of embarrassment is definitely derived from a lack of self-confidence (and imo, a lack of happiness).

    I guess ultimately my point is that extroversion doesn't necessarily point to happiness; it may point to a lack of internal confidence as well.

    Of course, this whole post is arguing from the stance that self-confidence and happiness go hand-in-hand. I do have a rationale for correlating the two, but I'm hoping that most people can already see a convincing reason to believe that they do indeed play off of each other.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    468 sx/sp
    Socionics
    EII None
    Posts
    4,383

    Default

    Yeah, I'm with all of that. Good post.

  4. #14
    That chalkboard guy Matthew_Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    xxxx
    Posts
    1,256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by teslashock View Post
    GFrom the other end of the spectrum, a similar rationale can be applied to arguing that introversion is not necessarily a corollary to unhappiness. Some introverts do not need external validation for their actions and ideas; they have a natural self-confidence that comes from within. In many cases, introverts may appear aloof and apathetic to social interaction because they see no need for it; they make themselves happy enough.
    Pretty much describes my case. I like me.

    Sucks to be one of those introverts that thinks they should be an extravert, however.
    If a deaf INFP falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

  5. #15
    Black Magic Buzzard Kra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    912

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew_Z View Post
    Pretty much describes my case. I like me.

    Sucks to be one of those introverts that thinks they should be an extravert, however.
    I agree.

    Whenever I forced myself to behave in an extroverted fashion, because I thought I should, I ended up being miserable.

    Oddly enough, when I just accepted that I was an introvert, and only socialized when I was comfortable with it, I made far greater social strides (ie. friends) than I did when I forced it. Even though I was spending far less time in social scenarios overall.

    I guess if you're energy reserves aren't properly charged, you're just going to sputter and break-down.
    Function Activity:
    Ni > Te > Ti = Fi > Ne > Si = Fe > Se

  6. #16
    Senior Member Grace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    426

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kra View Post
    I agree.

    Whenever I forced myself to behave in an extroverted fashion, because I thought I should, I ended up being miserable.

    Oddly enough, when I just accepted that I was an introvert, and only socialized when I was comfortable with it, I made far greater social strides (ie. friends) than I did when I forced it. Even though I was spending far less time in social scenarios overall.

    I guess if you're energy reserves aren't properly charged, you're just going to sputter and break-down.
    Nicely put.

  7. #17
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx/so
    Posts
    18,086

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by teslashock View Post
    Generally, extroverts appear happier, but that doesn't necessarily mean that they are. Extroverts are typically more concerned with their social reputations than are introverts, and most extroverts have the ability to pick up on the pattern that appearing happy enhances the capacity for a positive reputation within a primarily social context. This doesn't mean that extroverts actually are happy; their happy appearance can some times simply be attributed to their penchant for outward charm and charisma, regardless of what's actually going on internally for them.

    In other words, extroverts often rely on some form of external validation, and they realize that the best way to obtain this validation is by eliciting amicable social skills, so that's what they do. In some cases, extroverts desire this external validation because they have a decreased confidence in themselves that comes from within, and I'm willing to bet that in many cases, a lack of self-confidence is due to a lack of happiness.

    That's not to say that all extroverts are extroverts because they rely on external validation for generating their internal happiness. In many other cases, people are extroverted because they have a sense of confidence in their actions and ideas, so they have no shame in expressing themselves, and this confidence is indeed derived from happiness. But again, this is not the case for all extroverts.

    From the other end of the spectrum, a similar rationale can be applied to arguing that introversion is not necessarily a corollary to unhappiness. Some introverts do not need external validation for their actions and ideas; they have a natural self-confidence that comes from within. In many cases, introverts may appear aloof and apathetic to social interaction because they see no need for it; they make themselves happy enough.

    Now, just like I don't mean to imply that extroversion and happiness never correlate, I also don't mean to imply that introversion and happiness have a correlation under all circumstances. In other cases, introverts may be introverts because of a lack of confidence; they see the potential to be embarrassed in a majority of social contexts, so they often refrain from social interactions entirely. This apprehension of embarrassment is definitely derived from a lack of self-confidence (and imo, a lack of happiness).

    I guess ultimately my point is that extroversion doesn't necessarily point to happiness; it may point to a lack of internal confidence as well.

    Of course, this whole post is arguing from the stance that self-confidence and happiness go hand-in-hand. I do have a rationale for correlating the two, but I'm hoping that most people can already see a convincing reason to believe that they do indeed play off of each other.
    yeah that's a good point. if extraverts become happier around people and we get energized by the interaction then we would likely appear happier...but who's to say the introvert isn't equally happy when he's in his comfort zone...i'd say it's about the same. it just appears differently.
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  8. #18
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    7w8 sx/so
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,927

    Default

    Wouldn't it be nice if the study defined "happiness" so that it could be measured objectively?

    Subjective value judgements/statements are mercilessly predisposed to causing erroneous measure of anything associated with them.
    --------------------
    Type Stats:
    MBTI -> (E) 77.14% | (i) 22.86% ; (S) 60% | (n) 40% ; (T) 72.22% | (f) 27.78% ; (P) 51.43% | (j) 48.57%
    BIG 5 -> Extroversion 77% ; Accommodation 60% ; Orderliness 62% ; Emotional Stability 64% ; Open Mindedness 74%

    Quotes:
    "If somebody asks your MBTI type on a first date, run". -Donna Cecilia
    "Enneagram is psychological underpinnings. Cognitive Functions are mental reasoning and perceptional processes. -Sanjuro

  9. #19
    Senior Member Grace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    426

    Default

    I think it was something like higher life satisfaction or something.

  10. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    Wouldn't it be nice if the study defined "happiness" so that it could be measured objectively?

    Subjective value judgements/statements are mercilessly predisposed to causing erroneous measure of anything associated with them.
    I agree. A series of check boxes would come in handy. A cheat sheet for happiness. Weigh, count, measure.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 22
    Last Post: 07-10-2016, 10:41 AM
  2. Introverted functions are more ________ than their extroverted counterparts
    By Zarathustra in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 114
    Last Post: 07-05-2010, 05:32 PM
  3. Are you happy?
    By am_i_evil666 in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 02-05-2010, 09:27 AM
  4. Should we be grateful extroverts are on the way out?
    By Mole in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 75
    Last Post: 08-07-2009, 11:02 PM
  5. Are you happy?
    By 527468 in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 72
    Last Post: 12-05-2008, 01:35 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO