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  1. #21
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    And the definition of "winning" would be left open aswell
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  2. #22
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    And still are, its just that they moved to Oz.

    For our environment of flood, fire and drought mock our pretensions and teach us defeat.

    Our National Day, ANZAC Day, commemorates a defeat at Gallipoli.

    Our National Hero, Ned Kelly, went down in defeat.

    And we love losers.

    We live in the Antipodes and we are the perfect antipode to our cousins who live at the pode on the other side of the Earth and who celebrate victories, whose heros are winners, and who hate losers.

    We live at two cultural poles or podes with only the Earth between us.

    And fortunately distance makes the heart grow fonder.
    Hm, so why do the Aussies in England always refer to the English as "whinging Poms"?

    I think it's incredibly rude actually. The Aussies seem to like being over here for work or fun or travel or whatever, but they have no scruples in saying how much they hate the English. I think it's pretty damn rude to move to another country and then go on about how much you hate its inhabitants. I seriously may tell the next Aussie who tells something like that to go home (I'm Canadian, but live in the UK, and though I whinge about certain aspects of life here, as I would anywhere, I LIKE the English. More than the ex-pat Aussies, that's for sure.)

    Sorry, a little OT. (Oh dear...I am going to get a not entirely undeserved rep as an Aussie-hater on this forum )
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilkRoad View Post
    Hm, so why do the Aussies in England always refer to the English as "whinging Poms"?

    I think it's incredibly rude actually. The Aussies seem to like being over here for work or fun or travel or whatever, but they have no scruples in saying how much they hate the English. I think it's pretty damn rude to move to another country and then go on about how much you hate its inhabitants. I seriously may tell the next Aussie who tells something like that to go home (I'm Canadian, but live in the UK, and though I whinge about certain aspects of life here, as I would anywhere, I LIKE the English. More than the ex-pat Aussies, that's for sure.)

    Sorry, a little OT. (Oh dear...I am going to get a not entirely undeserved rep as an Aussie-hater on this forum )
    You don't understand. And why should you?

    For when we are polite, it means we don't like you. And the more polite, the more visceral the dislike.

    But if we do like you, the more we will deprecate you.

    We have a deprecating sense of humour, and not just self deprecating.

    Naturally we regard the English as family. And just like any family we pull each others' leg.

    For instance we never speak in deprecating terms of the Japanese, and rarely do we speak of the Americans in deprecating terms.

    You may like the English but to us they are family.

  4. #24
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    You don't understand. And why should you?

    For when we are polite, it means we don't like you. And the more polite, the more visceral the dislike.

    But if we do like you, the more we will deprecate you.

    We have a deprecating sense of humour, and not just self deprecating.

    Naturally we regard the English as family. And just like any family we pull each others' leg.

    For instance we never speak in deprecating terms of the Japanese, and rarely do we speak of the Americans in deprecating terms.

    You may like the English but to us they are family.
    Interesting - I will take this on board, it may give me a different perspective I am already aware that at least one thing I could learn from Aussies is to not take everything so ridiculously seriously
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilkRoad View Post
    Interesting - I will take this on board, it may give me a different perspective I am already aware that at least one thing I could learn from Aussies is to not take everything so ridiculously seriously
    We are also formally informal.

    So it is easy to mistake our informality for informality. I mean why would you think any different? But actually our informality is formally applied. And woe betide you if you break our strict rules of formality - you will earn our ridicule.

    Interestingly we are formal in a not dissimilar way to the formality of the American South. Quite different in manners of course, but still formal. So we actually feel more comfortable in the American South than the North.

    And surprisingly we feel comfortable in the formal cultures of Asia.

    We are of course larrikins, but formal larrikins.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    I personally think that Alexander the Great's Hellenistic Empire was probably the best in the world. You could argue Napoleon, but his reign was short and came to a abrupt end in about 1815 thanks to Typhoid fever and the harsh weather conditions of the Eastern-Russian planes.

    Furthermore, the Persian Empire, in about 500 BC proves awful powerful in light of Empires throughout our world's history. Conquering the entire Aegean peninsula after their famous, or infamous (depends on your perspective) over the Spartans at Thermophile.

    And lastly: the Roman Empire. One could argue that the Roman Empire can be considered to be the strongest in history, but when you compare it to the domination and imperialistic nature of the Hellenistic Period, the Roman Empire proves far less victorious. Conquering only about half of Europe (as compared to half of Europe, and almost half of Asia under Alexander the Great), the Roman Empire was only successful because the Romans faced hardly any an opposing foe..it was all about time. Poor leadership, over population, an imbalanced economy..all of these things lead to the downfall in 476. It's not like it was a surprise.

    And, oh, I almost forgot. The Mongol Empire. Arguably one of the most tactical, war-hungry, victorious, and mutant ways of lifestyle, great leaders such as Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan lead their hordes of power hungry, horse backed, archers through the Gobi desert managing to conquer China, hold Mongolia, and invading parts of India, Siberia, and parts of the western Middle-East. However, as these maneuvers were less of a governmental-fete (as no clear, definite, or efficient faucet of government held this band wagon together), the Mongolian Empire just misses the position of best Empire in the world.

    When you consider the modern-era, and thanks to our friend Imperialism, The British Empire must be considered. Colonizing posts around the world, the brave and powerful Royal Navy is responsible for the abduction of many a native land into the British Reign of Power. Look at India, The United States...both free nations today, but not after a complete social, political, and economic revolution. It is a blessing to have such an influential figure as Ghandi to back up Indian beliefs, spark patriotism, and lead to the freeing of the bonds of Britain. It is remarkable.

    In short, we learned that Empires can be conquering, powerful, selfish, ravage, and can conquer up to a third of the world. But ultimately, it comes down to the tactics at which these actions were carried out, the leaders in charge, and the effectiveness of the governmental infrastructure that followed. It can easily be said that Alexander the Great's Empire best meets this criteria, so let us take a moment to honor all of those many soldiers that gave their lives and their time to the creation of the World's Largest Empire.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Look at India, The United States...both free nations today, but not after a complete social, political, and economic revolution.
    Look at Australia, we gained our independence from Britain without killing anyone and we united a whole Continent without killing anyone.

    America waged a bourgeois revolution against the Crown and like any revolution only succeeded in eating its children in the Civil War.

    While the Indian revolution ate its own children in the communal violence that accompanied its dismemberment. Good God, India had been dismembered and its parts are in permanent war with each other.

    Revolution is ugly and evil and leave its mark on its children.

    But what would you expect, both India and America are founded on religion while Australia was founded by the Enlightenment.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    Look at Australia, we gained our independence from Britain without killing anyone and we united a whole Continent without killing anyone.

    America waged a bourgeois revolution against the Crown and like any revolution only succeeded in eating its children in the Civil War.

    While the Indian revolution ate its own children in the communal violence that accompanied its dismemberment. Good God, India had been dismembered and its parts are in permanent war with each other.

    Revolution is ugly and evil and leave its mark on its children.

    But what would you expect, both India and America are founded on religion while Australia was founded by the Enlightenment.
    Very good point, my friend. I guess that just goes to show that I honestly am not up to par in my studies with Australian history. It would seem that a society based on enlightenment really would prove more efficient in present day than would a society founded upon religion..as seperation of state and church, which came about in the during the Dark Ages of Europe, is vital for the continued prosperity and social and political welfare of a nation.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  9. #29
    Supreme Allied Commander Take Five's Avatar
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    Caldari for sure. Amarr is second.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Very good point, my friend. I guess that just goes to show that I honestly am not up to par in my studies with Australian history. It would seem that a society based on enlightenment really would prove more efficient in present day than would a society founded upon religion..as seperation of state and church, which came about in the during the Dark Ages of Europe, is vital for the continued prosperity and social and political welfare of a nation.
    'Cause its just an accident of history. It just happened we were founded during the Enlightenment and so Enlightenment values were carried here by those who came.

    If we were founded before the Enlightenment, we would have had religious values.

    What is interesting is how the founding values permeate a whole society. As a tree is bent so it grows.

    And what is even more interesting is how our individual values are shaped by society.

    The society we are born into gives us a culture. It is not something we create ourselves.

    However once we understand our society, we can go on to create within it.

    But we all have different starting points, so it will be interesting to see what we create.

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