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  1. #21
    Senior Member developer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by athenian200 View Post
    Weird. Why is that?
    I understand it is, because we actually do not read letters but words (or even half sentences), when we have some practice. The brain sees the pattern and fills in the gaps. I recently saw a whole page of text printed that way and it was easy to read.

    By the way, the brain does the same thing with memories as well. I find that scary....

  2. #22
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    ... but not nearly HALF as witty!
    Well . . . I guess I'll give you that one.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  3. #23
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by developer View Post
    I understand it is, because we actually do not read letters but words (or even half sentences), when we have some practice. The brain sees the pattern and fills in the gaps. I recently saw a whole page of text printed that way and it was easy to read.
    I always thought that was a neat trick.

    By the way, the brain does the same thing with memories as well. I find that scary....
    ... especially when you think about "eye-witness testimony" in a court setting. :horor:

    Worse, after the brain "fills in the space" in the memory, it seems to often forget then that the detail was filled in after the fact and not experienced first-hand. (Thus, memory is malleable.)
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #24
    No me digas, che! Recoleta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by developer View Post
    It is a tseted fcat taht you can raed worng wrods, as lnog as the frist and the lsat lteter are coerrct.

    Definately.
    On the contrary, while what you say is correct, it is actually the syntax of the sentence that is the most important. We think in whole ideas that make sense rather than in separate words:

    See you, wehn snyatx the crorcet not is it is hrdaer mcuh to secntene the raed.

    You see, wehn the snyatx is not crorcet it is mcuh hrdaer to raed the secntene.


  5. #25
    Senior Member developer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post

    Worse, after the brain "fills in the space" in the memory, it seems to often forget then that the detail was filled in after the fact and not experienced first-hand. (Thus, memory is malleable.)
    Actually, there seems to be data showing that we "remember" just a rough outline of what has happened, and that we fill it up with the most probable details when we are requested to remember. It is so scary you first do not want to believe it, but when you watch yourself remembering specific incindences you realize that it is actually true.

  6. #26
    The elder Holmes Mycroft's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by developer View Post
    Actually, there seems to be data showing that we "remember" just a rough outline of what has happened, and that we fill it up with the most probable details when we are requested to remember. It is so scary you first do not want to believe it, but when you watch yourself remembering specific incindences you realize that it is actually true.
    I think this method of memory is more of an N trait. Ss do, indeed, seem to build their memories up from concrete details.
    Dost thou love Life? Then do not squander Time; for that's the Stuff Life is made of.

    -- Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack, June 1746 --

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by developer View Post
    I understand it is, because we actually do not read letters but words (or even half sentences), when we have some practice. The brain sees the pattern and fills in the gaps. I recently saw a whole page of text printed that way and it was easy to read.
    The brain also "colors in" the blank spots in one's field of vision, as demonstrated by the old children's experiment for finding one's blind spot.

    (The retina has a blind spot in the back, which creates a blank spot in our field of vision in front of us. The brain compensates for this by "coloring in" the blank spot in our field of vision with whatever colors are close by in that part of our vision. See the link below, the first "illusion" with the cross and the dot, to find the blind spot.)

    Illusions and Brain Teasers: Physiological Illusions and Brain Teasers

    It's not quite the same thing as the other examples mentioned in the thread, but it shows how the brain is wired to carry out this "filling in" function even at the physiological level.

  8. #28
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Worse, after the brain "fills in the space" in the memory, it seems to often forget then that the detail was filled in after the fact and not experienced first-hand. (Thus, memory is malleable.)
    I think I'm hard-wired to make a mental note between filled-in and actual information. I do remember my subjective value judgements, like that "he was mean to me". Upon remembering such things first time, I question whether I was qualified to make such a judgement in the first place. I remember having experienced and stored my feelings as such, but then I'll often try to re-memorize the factual events, and to make new, objective value judgement, if anything.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by FineLine View Post
    Illusions and Brain Teasers: Physiological Illusions and Brain Teasers

    It's not quite the same thing as the other examples mentioned in the thread, but it shows how the brain is wired to carry out this "filling in" function even at the physiological level.
    First of all, what an interesting path this thread has taken.

    Secondly, The blind spot ones never work for me for some reason, but the pink dots in a circle on is really weird.

  10. #30
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    How about nuclear pronounced nukyalur? Definitely bothers me!

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