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  1. #11
    Senior Member Sahara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    Sounds like your difficulty is in reaching any sort of receptive happy relaxed state of mind. Pushing all the bad thoughts away isn't going to help, it'll just repress them into your dreams and fears.

    So, first you will need to learn to relax. Practice thinking happy bunny thoughts. Just lying there, awake, and not stressing. Relax, relax, relax. Learn to picture a happy place. This is a great trick if you can learn it. A refuge, a place of total contentment and completion. Make it a visual image and learn to concentrate on it in your mind's eye. For me, it is a swimming pool on a tropical island, all deserted, but safe. Just me, in the warm sun, floating contentedly. Find one that works for you. Think of it. And again. And again. And again, until you relax. Don't push the bad thoughts away, just let them drift away as the happy bunny contented ones take over. Make it like a mantra, again, again again. Allow the "happy place" to take over until you float in a gentle sea of contentment. Try to slow your mind down - when it races, allow the consciousness above... aside..to just gently switch those centres of your mind off. So let the thoughts drift away in the sea of contentment.... so that if your mind won't stop racing, it slowly becomes like the volume and brightness turned down on the tv.. the pictures and words slowly submerge beneath the relaxed contentment and emptiness of your relaxed happy space. If it helps (doesn't for me, but can for others), learn to recite a few words of some phrase that will help "I am calm, I am relaxed."

    Spend a few evenings trying this for 10 minutes at a time - it isn't easy, but it is a useful first step towards meditation and controlled lucid dreaming. It helps the mind reach a receptive state. Until you can reach happy contented relaxation when awake, your dreams will just follow the late night stress and tension and repression. So your first exercise is this seemingly simple one - learn to relax and content in your own head.

    It is also helpful if you have to suffer some horrid pain if you have this happy place to keep your mind in refuge - I find it great for trips to the dentist

    No apologies for explaining this in fine detail - you seem to be having problems with the whole process and wanted to talk you through how to put it all together, at least in my own experience.

    -Geoff

    Hey, I understand it better now, I think I can do this. Must be all that "happy fluffy" INFP language you included.

    Thanks for that explanation Geoff, it makes more sense. So rather than just trying blank out my mind, I just create a better place to be.

    No doubt it will be a struggle lol, I can almost picture the mental battle that will take place as my dark fears war with the happy thoughts, back and forth in an endless dance of supremacy.

    Think of rivendell.
    "No one can be free of the chains that surround them"

  2. #12
    Senior Member Vortex's Avatar
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    Geoff really made some excellent posts. I just wanted to add, that for me, it also helps a lot to control my lucid dreams right after I've woken up in the morning and let myself fall asleep again. I know that it's not all people who can simply fall asleep again immediately after waking up, but if you can, it might be worth trying if you usually crash at night (like I do, too). It seems that most of my dreams are lucid dreams; the only really terrible dreams I've had have been the ones that weren't lucid, because they seemed more real to me than reality itself.

    I don't necessarily have to think myself into a meditative state. When I manage to get a few minutes to myself before I fall asleep, I can just lay in bed and feel the world spinning slowly around me, almost asleep and it's at that point I can control what I want to dream about. I just include this if you've felt the same sensation.

  3. #13
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    Can you really feel pain in dreams?
    I hardly remember any of my dreams, except some nightmares I have, but they are too surrealistic to affect me. Sometimes I am also aware I am dreaming and I even can persuade myself to wake up.
    Someother times I am aware I am moving physically without been awake, but in these cases it is impossible to wake myself up

  4. #14
    Senior Member Vortex's Avatar
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    I've felt intense pain in dreams, but only in the non-lucid ones. Physical pain as well as mental hurt.

  5. #15
    Senior Membrane spirilis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    Sounds like your difficulty is in reaching any sort of receptive happy relaxed state of mind. Pushing all the bad thoughts away isn't going to help, it'll just repress them into your dreams and fears.

    So, first you will need to learn to relax. Practice thinking happy bunny thoughts. Just lying there, awake, and not stressing. Relax, relax, relax. Learn to picture a happy place. This is a great trick if you can learn it. A refuge, a place of total contentment and completion. Make it a visual image and learn to concentrate on it in your mind's eye. For me, it is a swimming pool on a tropical island, all deserted, but safe. Just me, in the warm sun, floating contentedly. Find one that works for you. Think of it. And again. And again. And again, until you relax. Don't push the bad thoughts away, just let them drift away as the happy bunny contented ones take over. Make it like a mantra, again, again again. Allow the "happy place" to take over until you float in a gentle sea of contentment. Try to slow your mind down - when it races, allow the consciousness above... aside..to just gently switch those centres of your mind off. So let the thoughts drift away in the sea of contentment.... so that if your mind won't stop racing, it slowly becomes like the volume and brightness turned down on the tv.. the pictures and words slowly submerge beneath the relaxed contentment and emptiness of your relaxed happy space. If it helps (doesn't for me, but can for others), learn to recite a few words of some phrase that will help "I am calm, I am relaxed."

    Spend a few evenings trying this for 10 minutes at a time - it isn't easy, but it is a useful first step towards meditation and controlled lucid dreaming. It helps the mind reach a receptive state. Until you can reach happy contented relaxation when awake, your dreams will just follow the late night stress and tension and repression. So your first exercise is this seemingly simple one - learn to relax and content in your own head.

    It is also helpful if you have to suffer some horrid pain if you have this happy place to keep your mind in refuge - I find it great for trips to the dentist

    No apologies for explaining this in fine detail - you seem to be having problems with the whole process and wanted to talk you through how to put it all together, at least in my own experience.

    -Geoff
    Thank you for posting this. (I've been trying to 'meditate' myself with no success, and similar to Sahara, I just crash like a rock wherever I lay...)

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