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  1. #21
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Outsider View Post
    Once I was confronted by my mother, about why I always enter the bathroom twice. I played stupid of course, but it was a necessary push. I stopped including the bathroom to my rules then. I also got older and eventually started dropping more and more rules. I still remember when I first went into my bed without any regard for the rules. It took incredible willpower from me, and then I was just lying there, panting, like I've just achieved the biggest goal in my life.
    That's when I got rid of it for good. Sometimes I even did many things deliberately in odd numbers, as to test myself.

    It was rather strange I must say. I don't feel I have any real OCD tendencies nowadays.

    I'm not sure if any of this actually has anything to do with OCD. If not, feel free to open fire on me.
    There is no need to open fire on you; OCD is largely a continuum, and some sufferers have it worse than others. What you have described is (essentially) the reccommended means of dealing with OCD symptoms. I am very happy that your OCD is deep in remission, in the event that it ever comes back be sure to remember how you dealt with it previously.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    Random thought:

    When my level of stress goes up, so does the severity of my OCD symptoms.

    It's almost like a control mechanism, if I can control my environment, my stress goes down.

    Somehow the illusion of control is comforting to me, I don't know why.

    Anyhow, whatever, back to surfing the web...
    That's a very good point as i have never associated it with my stress levels. I used to be stressed about anything and everything so i think having that aspect of control made me feel better.
    Now things have calmed down so much in my life, i don't worry about any of it. I only check the doors once, the plugs once then i go to bed and not worry about a thing (other than the usual) .
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

  3. #23
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amira View Post
    Anyway, I'm glad you've figured it out TCO because having a name for it can be such a help. Don't get discouraged, it is very possible to live happily despite having OCD.
    Thanks a lot, yeah it definitely does help. I feel sort of relieved in a way.

    Quote Originally Posted by raz View Post
    Just don't confuse SJ tendencies with OCD. I think my psych class classified psych disorders as...deviant, distressful and dysfunctional? You can't help the effect society has on disorders, but it's just disappointing seeing the labeling that happens with it. I was talking to an ESFJ coworker that was really about making sure the things she cleaned up were clean and organized to a T. When I talked to her about it, she just said, "Well, I'm OCD about it." I know she meant it jokingly, but that stuff just still bothers me.
    Yeah, like I said though - the public's perception of OCD is skewed. This is actually true for many disorders but OCD is one in particular. There are deeper symptoms than what the public opinion is. I know it's not an SJ thing because of these deeper symptoms I have had in my past that don't have anything to do with SJ (I'm not talking about cleanliness lol).

    Quote Originally Posted by The Outsider View Post
    Once I was confronted by my mother, about why I always enter the bathroom twice. I played stupid of course, but it was a necessary push. I stopped including the bathroom to my rules then. I also got older and eventually started dropping more and more rules. I still remember when I first went into my bed without any regard for the rules. It took incredible willpower from me, and then I was just lying there, panting, like I've just achieved the biggest goal in my life.
    That's when I got rid of it for good. Sometimes I even did many things deliberately in odd numbers, as to test myself.

    It was rather strange I must say. I don't feel I have any real OCD tendencies nowadays.
    Now THIS is interesting. Maybe you discovered a treatment option.

    Quote Originally Posted by lowtech redneck View Post
    Yeah, second only to my family, OCD has been the most defining aspect of my life. From 8th grade through the first half of sophomore year, I was regularly (and quite sincerely) praying for death. It DOES get better (so long as one learns how to deal with it) and for the past ten years I've gone for months or even years at a time without a serious relapse (though it remains a not-insignificant aspect of my daily existence). Hang in there.
    Thanks, yeah, mine used to be really really bad, would take over my life, it would be almost all I could think of.

    Quote Originally Posted by Amira View Post
    You guys are right that stress makes it much worse. As my siblings and I have gotten older we have gotten much more able to deal with stress, but we still have to be careful about how much we do or else we get exhausted and have really bad symptoms for a while. Arranging your life with regards to some sort of balance is a good idea for everyone, but vital for people with OCD. At least the handy thing about being in a whole family of them was we tended to notice things and be like, "Hello? Snap out of it." when someone was stuck in a loop and we knew better what questions to ask to find out what was going on with someone and how they were doing. Support from friendly people can help immensely.
    Quote Originally Posted by saslou View Post
    That's a very good point as i have never associated it with my stress levels. I used to be stressed about anything and everything so i think having that aspect of control made me feel better.
    Now things have calmed down so much in my life, i don't worry about any of it. I only check the doors once, the plugs once then i go to bed and not worry about a thing (other than the usual) .
    Yeah from reading the rplies here, and also evaluating my own past and present experiences, it seems like stress has a lot to with the severity of the symptoms. Lesson is: Don't get too stressed out!

  4. #24
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheChosenOne View Post

    Lesson is: Don't get too stressed out!
    .. lol, great in theory .. lets just see if that can be put into practice.
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

  5. #25
    Senior Member Amira's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by TheChosenOne

    Lesson is: Don't get too stressed out!
    Quote Originally Posted by saslou View Post
    .. lol, great in theory .. lets just see if that can be put into practice.
    Hee hee. Just repeat after me, good enough is great, perfection is overrated! Relax and don't worry if you are relaxing the right way! Etc... (In other words, if you are realize you are stressed out, don't let that be another source of stress by feeling guilty... Just take a deep breath, smile, and keep doing whatever bit you can do.) It's amazing how long it took me to really get that concept! Oh well, now I will go and practice my not-being-stressed. :smiley_violin: Hmph, we need a chocolate symbol here!
    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. ~Plato

  6. #26
    Alexander the Terrible yenom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    Random thought:

    When my level of stress goes up, so does the severity of my OCD symptoms.

    It's almost like a control mechanism, if I can control my environment, my stress goes down.

    Somehow the illusion of control is comforting to me, I don't know why.

    Anyhow, whatever, back to surfing the web...
    ESTP has ocd. That makes no sense
    The fear of poverty turns people into slaves of money.

    "In this Caesar there are many Mariuses"~Sulla

    Conquer your inner demons first before you conquer the world.

  7. #27
    Welcome to Sunnyside Mondo's Avatar
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    I have the tendency to be very obsessive.
    In fact, I would argue that my general sense of happiness is simply determined by what I am obsessing over at the moment..
    MBTI Type: iNTj
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  8. #28
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    In thinking about OCD I ask myself, what is OCD; and to bring it into focus, I ask, what is the opposite of OCD.

    OCD takes many forms but at its heart is repetition.

    We repeat the same pattern over and over because it brings us comfort.

    Oddly enough a trance can be induced by any repetition.

    So OCD can be seen as a trance induction - so we now have the OCD trance.

    And one purpose of a trance is to put our critical mind to sleep. And if our critical mind is stressing us and making us anxious, putting it to sleep will reduce our anxiety and bring us comfort.

    So in the larger sphere you might say OCD is like any ritual designed to calm the cognitive mind.

    However it is possible to calm the cognitive mind as a deliberate act of will in order to waken the creative mind.

    And interestingly the creative mind has no need to repeat anything. The creative mind seeks to make something new each time. Repetition dulls the creative impulse.

    So on one hand OCD is a trance which relaxes our critical mind so we can enter the comfort of our creative mind.

    But the problem is that OCD is a form of addictive trance that takes us to the door of creativity, over and over again, but does not take us inside.

    And humour is part of the critical mind, and is remarkably absent in OCD. So as OCD turns off the critical mind it also turns off the sense of humour.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    OCD huh, lots of misinformation to why it happens and is totally changeable, as many forms of anxiety and mental issues are and western drugs are often the myopia rather than the cure.

    Since serotonin is a chemical that travels across the nerve synapse and the thicker the myelin sheathing on the nervous system, the more potential for the releasing of serotonin, it make sense to nourish the nervous system. Because a thin myelin, where the dysfunction in the myelin of nerve fibers causes the interruption of smooth delivery of information to your brain then you're going to be in all sorts of stress. And stress can thin the myelin sheath, it can also overstimulate the adrenals. Therefore it is common to have both myelin and adrenal problems simultaneously and personally that will start to mess with other endocrine processes such as your thyroids. And why would this happen at all, easy lacking in magnesium, zinc, inositol etc.

    Stands to reason that once you restore your weakened adrenals by addressing why the myelin sheath is thin so your nerve connectivity can do its job and send the right signals rather than stress you out then you'll feel better.

    This is a good article to read.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amira View Post
    Hee hee. Just repeat after me, good enough is great, perfection is overrated! Relax and don't worry if you are relaxing the right way! Etc... (In other words, if you are realize you are stressed out, don't let that be another source of stress by feeling guilty... Just take a deep breath, smile, and keep doing whatever bit you can do.) It's amazing how long it took me to really get that concept! Oh well, now I will go and practice my not-being-stressed. :smiley_violin: Hmph, we need a chocolate symbol here!
    Bless you .. I am going to use that first sentence in my signature thing so i will always be able to see it. And calm.
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

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