User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 34

  1. #11
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    I
    Posts
    3,104

    Default

    First off, thanks for the replies.

    Quote Originally Posted by raz View Post
    The thing I have against OCD is the standards in which they use to diagnose someone with it. You can't judge whether you have it just by comparing yourself to the people around you or even society. I hate when people throw around the term in casual conversation. Most of the time, they're labeling natural tendencies regarded as bad by society with a serious disorder that actually significantly affects some people's lives.
    Yeah, but this is not the case for me. OCD isn't just about being obsessive about being super-clean and super-tidy. Some of the symptoms are far darker. Unfortunately these darker symptoms have interfered severely with my daily life.

    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    I think when people say they have add or ocd or something they probably, don't we're just a disorder happy society. I know I don't have add, I have add like behavior when I don't want to do something, but I think that has to do more with being a P, and not wanting to do whatever it it. But when I'm actually interested in something I'll spend hours doing that one thing.
    Yeah, but the symptoms of OCD have explained many things I've done/thought throughout my life.

  2. #12
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    I
    Posts
    3,104

    Default

    At one point in my life, these OCD symptoms took over myself, it was a very difficult point in my life but I didn't tell anyone. The symptoms sort of occur in stages too, with different obsessions in each stage. It's not so easy to get out of them either. OCD isn't really what they portray in the public, about being super obsessed with cleanliness and such, the symptoms could take on much more. The disorder is really no joke, and the term should not be thrown around as much as it does.

  3. #13
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    7w8 sx/so
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,927

    Default

    Random thought:

    When my level of stress goes up, so does the severity of my OCD symptoms.

    It's almost like a control mechanism, if I can control my environment, my stress goes down.

    Somehow the illusion of control is comforting to me, I don't know why.

    Anyhow, whatever, back to surfing the web...

  4. #14
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    I
    Posts
    3,104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    Random thought:

    When my level of stress goes up, so does the severity of my OCD symptoms.

    It's almost like a control mechanism, if I can control my environment, my stress goes down.
    Yeah I agree with this, it happens to me too.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Amira's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Posts
    199

    Default

    OK, I'll admit it, I do have OCD. I hope this does not add to the misperception of SJs = OCD. I have several NF family members who have worse symptoms than I do. OCD is very, very different from the popular image and actually being a "clean compulsive" person does not usually lead to the whole house being sparkling all the time. More like, areas of the house are sterile and other areas are left alone - it can be a very confusing disorder to onlookers as well as the person with it. Tourette's/OCD both run very strongly in my family and we have had a LOT of experience with it now. My grandfather still doesn't like to hear about it so we try not to mention it much around him or rub it in that he has it (makes him feel bad), but so many of my relatives have it that it's kinda scary!

    One of my brothers had a breakdown when he was 13. The severity of his compulsions made it almost impossible for him to do anything. We made some major life changes and he began to recover without medication. Fortunately he is much better now, years later. It seems that as my siblings and I grew up the boys became more Tourettish and the girls became more OCDish. I don't think I have any tics now and haven't for a very long time, but I do have certain compulsions. No new ones in years, which is a major relief.

    You guys are right that stress makes it much worse. As my siblings and I have gotten older we have gotten much more able to deal with stress, but we still have to be careful about how much we do or else we get exhausted and have really bad symptoms for a while. Arranging your life with regards to some sort of balance is a good idea for everyone, but vital for people with OCD. At least the handy thing about being in a whole family of them was we tended to notice things and be like, "Hello? Snap out of it." when someone was stuck in a loop and we knew better what questions to ask to find out what was going on with someone and how they were doing. Support from friendly people can help immensely.

    Anyway, I'm glad you've figured it out TCO because having a name for it can be such a help. Don't get discouraged, it is very possible to live happily despite having OCD.
    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. ~Plato

  6. #16
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,705

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    Totally! But I love my OCD.

    Does it get in the way sometimes? Sure it does. I cannot for the life of me leave a single drop of water in my kitchen sink when doing dishes. Oh, and did I mention I can't have a single dish or utensil in my sink either? Also, I can't study in my den if laundry is all over the guest bed, it's all got to be folded and put away. How many hours a week do I waste on such rituals? Lots...but it's OK. Why?

    My house is clean! There is order around me and I have peace of mind once these simple OCD-isms are accomodated.

    I also re-direct it at things that are beneficial to do in a ritualistic manner, such as eat nutritious food daily (2 fruits + 2 veggies!), exercise regularly, and have two pre-selected late homework nights per week.

    So, it is a disposition if wielded correctly, and a disorder if left to run amuk in one's psyche.

    I'm sure extreme cases need more intervention than I cast at mine, but the above is what works for me...

    uh, no-what you have is obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

    Quote Originally Posted by raz View Post
    The thing I have against OCD is the standards in which they use to diagnose someone with it. You can't judge whether you have it just by comparing yourself to the people around you or even society. I hate when people throw around the term in casual conversation. Most of the time, they're labeling natural tendencies regarded as bad by society with a serious disorder that actually significantly affects some people's lives.
    Thank you.

  7. #17
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,705

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    I used to suffer from it pretty seriously, but I found weed helps calm it down. I still have to balance things and I hate stepping on cracks, though.
    Weed has the opposite effect on me; it often aggravates my (admittingly very severe) OCD, to the point where I choose not to indulge anymore. Alcohol has a consistently positive effect, however.

  8. #18
    Let's make this showy! raz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    LoLz
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Just don't confuse SJ tendencies with OCD. I think my psych class classified psych disorders as...deviant, distressful and dysfunctional? You can't help the effect society has on disorders, but it's just disappointing seeing the labeling that happens with it. I was talking to an ESFJ coworker that was really about making sure the things she cleaned up were clean and organized to a T. When I talked to her about it, she just said, "Well, I'm OCD about it." I know she meant it jokingly, but that stuff just still bothers me.

    I guess if you don't know that much about your personality or have much self-respect, it's easy to classify something you do as a disorder since it's different from the majority. It's the same thing that happens with introverts.


  9. #19
    Senior Member The Outsider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    intp
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx
    Posts
    2,428

    Default

    I used to have a really bad case of this repeating thingy when I was a lot younger. Everything I did, had to be an even number.

    So, at first it was like. Blink twice. Blink twice, twice... so 4 times. Then 8. And so on.

    It was everything really. My steps, entering rooms, sitting, scratching, blinking, chewing, swallowing, eating, reading, thinking, speaking. (I took it a little easy on reading, but repeated most of my "vocal" thoughts, and everything I said, in my head. Didn't really speak much, and avoided long sentences, so I would remember the exact wording)

    It only reached the highest numbers on entering my room and getting in bed. It took me hell of long time to finally actually get inside my room, as I had to leave and return countless times. At it peak it was well over 100, and it was basically one feet outside and the other inside, and then sort of stepping on the spot.
    Also, once I got in bed in the evening, I just wasn't capable of leaving it. Even if I was called or somebody wanted me to get out for a second, for whatever reason. I just refused, played sick, and whatever I could really.

    All this resulted in me avoiding my room, or never leaving it once inside. Avoiding all the chairs, beds, sofas at home - sitting on the floor mostly. Being outdoors most of the time, staying out of kitchen and some other rooms. Not speaking much, deterioration of relationships with my family members, deterioration of my school grades, severe stress, etc.

    I did it because my father used to drink a lot and my parents were fighting all of the time. It got to me very hard, and I thought that I was the cause of it. The only way to keep things well, was to perform those procedures, which I called "the rules". Failure to do so had consequences.
    The rules were therefore the most "necessary" at home and around family. I kept up with those more personal (blinking, chewing, repeating sentences, etc.) everywhere though.

    Once I was confronted by my mother, about why I always enter the bathroom twice. I played stupid of course, but it was a necessary push. I stopped including the bathroom to my rules then. I also got older and eventually started dropping more and more rules. I still remember when I first went into my bed without any regard for the rules. It took incredible willpower from me, and then I was just lying there, panting, like I've just achieved the biggest goal in my life.
    That's when I got rid of it for good. Sometimes I even did many things deliberately in odd numbers, as to test myself.

    It was rather strange I must say. I don't feel I have any real OCD tendencies nowadays.

    I'm not sure if any of this actually has anything to do with OCD. If not, feel free to open fire on me.

  10. #20
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,705

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheChosenOne View Post
    At one point in my life, these OCD symptoms took over myself, it was a very difficult point in my life but I didn't tell anyone. The symptoms sort of occur in stages too, with different obsessions in each stage. It's not so easy to get out of them either. OCD isn't really what they portray in the public, about being super obsessed with cleanliness and such, the symptoms could take on much more. The disorder is really no joke, and the term should not be thrown around as much as it does.
    Yeah, second only to my family, OCD has been the most defining aspect of my life. From 8th grade through the first half of sophomore year, I was regularly (and quite sincerely) praying for death. It DOES get better (so long as one learns how to deal with it) and for the past ten years I've gone for months or even years at a time without a serious relapse (though it remains a not-insignificant aspect of my daily existence). Hang in there.

Similar Threads

  1. Personality Disorders and P-Types
    By heart in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 08-11-2012, 09:14 PM
  2. DSM-2023 reports new personality disorder
    By ygolo in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 09-11-2007, 08:24 PM
  3. MB & Personality disorders(& near disorders)
    By artie in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 09-03-2007, 05:00 AM
  4. The Semantics of Compulsive Attachment
    By wildcat in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-30-2007, 02:38 PM
  5. Musical obsession poll
    By Langrenus in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-21-2007, 01:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO