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  1. #11
    in-game Gamine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPiranha View Post
    I heart you too. *takes a fingerful of your pink icing*

    Let me ask you - what year, make, and model are you driving?


    I once had a mysterious situation with my Silverado. I couldn't clear it up no matter what I did. It was a "no power" problem. I rolled the dratted thing into the garage every day, even went so far as to bend a paper clip, override the rudimentary on-board computer and pull logged codes from the system. No help at all! There were no less than six boys and two foreman under the hood with their butts hanging out, scratching their heads in puzzlement.


    I'll make another post about "gonna be driving around like a drivin' fool this summer"!

    YOU JUST ATE MY EARS! DAGNABBIT! Oh well. I liked it.

    Suzuki SX4 Sport Sedan. It loves corners, long drives by the beach, and I can still feel/hear the subwoofer after I turn off the ignition. It is a never been chewed 2008.

    Your oil story reminds me of the start of a great movie. That needs to be written. "Pink and the Seven Greasemonkeys."

    I appreciate this very much Pink, I really want to understand how it works (because learning is awesome) but I also want to be competent enough to go into a shop, know what people are talking about, and be independent.
    "Beware Those Who Are ALWAYS READING BOOKS" - Bukowski

  2. #12
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    Going to be a Drivin' Fool like Killer Cupcake?

    1. Check your tire pressure. Tire pressure gauges are cheap and not hard to find. Buy one from your local auto shop and keep it in the glove compartment at all times. You can even ask one of the guys/gals at the store to show you how to use the tire gauge if you aren't sure. They'll be happy to assist you.

    How to check:
    do this before driving anywhere so that the tires (and air inside them) is quite cool. Kneel down by the tire, unscrew the valve stem cap (keep a good grip on that sucker -- or just put it in your pocket til you're done), and firmly apply the tire gauge. This can be tricky for anyone so try it two or three times. The gauge will cause a sudden hiss of air and the stick should pop out, revealing what is supposedly your present tire pressure. Take two readings per tire to be sure you have a good idea of what you have.

    Refer to your owner's manual for proper inflation of tires. Do NOT EVER over-inflate your tires. If you accidentally do, just use your handy tire gauge to bleed off the excess. Proper tire inflation will not only increase your tires' life spans, but will also prevent a blow-out or if underinflated, weird and damaging wear to the sidewalls of the tires.

    Also, check out the state of your spare. Does it look good? No dry rotting? Also be sure to locate the little tool bag thingie that the car usually comes with for changing a flat. You might have to do it (no fun!!) in a pinch, but usually you can call or wave down a cop or trooper who will be happy to help.

    2. Check your coolant level.

    How to check: I ward any non-mechanic away from the cooling system because it's possibly one of the most dangerous systems on the car. I've known trained mechanics to get scalded (including my ex-bf) so here's what you do --- again, nice and cool, before you drive anywhere. Locate the coolant reservoir in the engine bay. There should be a line on the plastic telling you what your fluid state is. The reservoir is where you will add coolant, NOT THROUGH THE RADIATOR CAP. DO NOT TOUCH THE CAP.

    Radiator caps are rated by pounds of pressure. They keep an EXTREMELY hot fluid from boiling, so when you pop the cap off a hot engine, the pressure is removed and the fluid will flash-boil, explode out of the opening and possibly burn you, not to mention the highly poisonous content of anti-freeze -- it absorbs quickly and if you get it in your eyes, you're really in trouble, so please don't touch the cap. No reason to at any rate, not for maintenance purposes.

    It's also important to run this check when the engine is cool because the reservoir also serves as a storage or "burp back" for the radiator to compensate for cooling/heating.

    3. Check your battery.

    How to check: You will be doing a visual check only (as I don't believe most folks have a voltmeter lying about). Many batteries these days have a built in "power strip" that will give a rough idea of your battery's state of charge. Some can even be opened and water added to them, but again, YOU WILL NOT DO THIS. Batteries are touchy customers - don't mess with them unless they die.

    Is there corrosion? White or bluish chalky stuff around the terminals? Are the cables -- with a not too hard tug -- solidly bolted to the battery?
    eNFJ 4w3 sx/so 468 tritype
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  3. #13
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwinkleToes View Post
    YOU JUST ATE MY EARS! DAGNABBIT! Oh well. I liked it.
    *urp*

    Suzuki SX4 Sport Sedan. It loves corners, long drives by the beach, and I can still feel/hear the subwoofer after I turn off the ignition. It is a never been chewed 2008.

    Your oil story reminds me of the start of a great movie. That needs to be written. "Pink and the Seven Greasemonkeys."

    I appreciate this very much Pink, I really want to understand how it works (because learning is awesome) but I also want to be competent enough to go into a shop, know what people are talking about, and be independent.
    I'm glad to help anyway I can, babe! I know what it's like for women around cars. They want to learn, just like I did, but may be too shy to ask, or even discouraged from asking. I would walk into places sometimes covered in grease and dirt, ask for something specific, get a patronizing look/"little lady" speech, and get really ticked off. I had no idea how difficult it was for women to get a straight answer, esp about something so important. Not cool!

    I was part of a two-person team doing an engine transplant on a woman's Cadillac. The old engine was stunning really, it had formed some nasty weird inaudible harmonic that actually shattered the crankshaft. lol O.o WTH?! She told me that she was glad I was there because she felt more comfortable speaking to another female. I totally understood what she meant. I hate feeling stupid or withholding a question/concern for fear of being treated like a troublesome moron.
    eNFJ 4w3 sx/so 468 tritype
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPiranha View Post
    It's been debated between myself and my foreman many times about the whole "x,000 miles mandatory change" but playing it safe is best. Considering that many cars may inhale a great deal more dirt and dust than others, don't take a chance.
    Haha thanks for the thread Pink. We now need more technical terms. I study cars in university, so I know how they run, but I need to learn english technical terms.

    I actually read in a magazine, concerning new engines, they tested a new car for like 100000 km, which are 63000 miles, without changing the oil once. And it run until the end. Of course that only works with totally new cars.

    If you buy a new engine, its good but although not necessary nowadays to have your first change of oil pretty early. Because there is a fine abrasion at new cylinders, when you first need to get the engine run up to like 1000 miles. After that every 6500 miles roughly, the cylinders shrink in diameter about 0.0004 inches, due to forces being applied to them pushing them stronger into one side of the casing. The forces are in induced by the crankshaft and mostly at very slow rpm's.

    Those metal abrasions in form of particles will mix with the oil and rub on the cylinders like a metal sponge, which is not good.

    So if you have a car you love and want to make an oldtimer, change the oil every 10000 miles. If you have just a common car, change it for the first time after 10000 miles and then every 20000.

    Also watch from time to time the engine coolant. It should fastly warm up and then stop at a given point. The thermostat, which closes at a given temperature of the engine coolant closes at around 200 fahrenheit in most cars. But it can break. Besides that remember the coolant temperature is not the engine temperature. To drive cars only short distances and not for long periods will slowly ruin the material. An engine is built for long distances and continous operation. So if you cant help it and have to drive only short distances, go on the highway at least once in the month. Your engine will love you for that .

    One thing in the end, the bearings the crankshaft is suited in, are always made for the middle of your rpm display. So if the display goes from 1000 to 6000, best place to keep the crankshaft spinning is at about 3000 - 3500. If you want to save gas and only drive low rpms, bear in mind to change periodically between low rpms and higher rpms, to keep your crankshaft happy. Low rpms and shifting back manually in lower gears, always uses the crankshaft.
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  5. #15
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by entropie View Post
    Haha thanks for the thread Pink. We now need more technical terms. I study cars in university, so I know how they run, but I need to learn english technical terms.
    Certainly. And I'll be happy to show you where the cars boobs are.

    I actually read in a magazine, concerning new engines, they tested a new car for like 100000 km, which are 63000 miles, without changing the oil once. And it run until the end. Of course that only works with totally new cars.
    If anyone is aware of this -- New York City cabs are some of the longest lived engines in use. Why? Because the engines are almost NEVER shut down. There is a great reduction in the trauma of start up, thus greatly reducing wear on the engines. It's not unheard of for a cab (being passed still running from driver to driver on their shift changes) to log several 100,000 miles without an engine overhaul of any kind.

    If you buy a new engine, its good but although not necessary nowadays to have your first change of oil pretty early. Because there is a fine abrasion at new cylinders, when you first need to get the engine run up to like 1000 miles. After that every 6500 miles roughly, the cylinders shrink in diameter about 0.0004 inches, due to forces being applied to them pushing them stronger into one side of the casing. The forces are in induced by the crankshaft and mostly at very slow rpm's.

    Those metal abrasions in form of particles will mix with the oil and rub on the cylinders like a metal sponge, which is not good.

    So if you have a car you love and want to make an oldtimer, change the oil every 10000 miles. If you have just a common car, change it for the first time after 10000 miles and then every 20000.
    Yes, break in time is critical for any new engine. There's a procedure for that. A new engine must never be "romped" or taken over a certain speed until x-number of miles, then the oil must be drained off and replaced to remove any and all metal shavings/particles.

    Thank you for the physical "here's what happens", Entropie! I never knew that!

    Also watch from time to time the engine coolant. It should fastly warm up and then stop at a given point. The thermostat, which closes at a given temperature of the engine coolant closes at around 200 fahrenheit in most cars. But it can break. Besides that remember the coolant temperature is not the engine temperature. To drive cars only short distances and not for long periods will slowly ruin the material. An engine is built for long distances and continous operation. So if you cant help it and have to drive only short distances, go on the highway at least once in the month. Your engine will love you for that .

    One thing in the end, the bearings the crankshaft is suited in, are always made for the middle of your rpm display. So if the display goes from 1000 to 6000, best place to keep the crankshaft spinning is at about 3000 - 3500. If you want to save gas and only drive low rpms, bear in mind to change periodically between low rpms and higher rpms, to keep your crankshaft happy. Low rpms and shifting back manually in lower gears, always uses the crankshaft.
    Smart boy!
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  6. #16
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
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    I guess I should rummage through my coin jar to see if I have an american penny hiding somewhere.

    Thank you to Pink and Entropie for auto maintenance tips.
    My stuff (design & other junk) lives here: http://nnbox.ca

  7. #17
    Senior Membrane spirilis's Avatar
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    Wow Pink was hot before but this is hotter than the burning sun. Awesome thread Pinkie

    For the record, I tighten my lugnuts finger-tight then tap them with 1 or 2 short impacts of the gun, then after the car's dropped I crank to 85 ft/lbs in a star pattern using a torque wrench. That's worked pretty well for me with my last car and current one.

    Before I had access to air tools I'd just hug the tire with one arm and crank it down as tight as I could get it in that position, drop the car and finish the job there.
    intp | type 9w1 sp/sx/so

  8. #18
    The Black Knight Domino's Avatar
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    Spir - I know. I got so spoiled on having a lift around. Doing things in the driveway seemed like such a hassle after that! lol
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  9. #19
    Self sustaining supernova Zoom's Avatar
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    Pink?

    This is semi-related but for a different type of vehicle: I have just tentatively acquired a motorcycle. Do you know how to pick a good mechanic for motorcycles? (Is it the same bit as to word-of-mouth?)

  10. #20
    Senior Membrane spirilis's Avatar
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    Another piece of advice--if you're daring enough to start taking shit apart, keep a good can of penetrating oil (PB Blaster works great for me... can get it at autozone/advance auto/hell walmart might even carry it) and if a bolt is giving you a lot of trouble while you're loosening it, before you strip the hex off the bolt (like I did to my motorcycle's oil drain bolt recently) -- STOP, spray some of that shit around the head/into the threads and WALK AWAY for 2 hours or so.
    intp | type 9w1 sp/sx/so

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