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Thread: Adult ADD.

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    Default Adult ADD.

    I have no idea where to start this, so I'll start it here for now.

    So, is ADD real or is it an excuse for kids -and later on adults- to be unproductive ?

    I have read about it on a couple sources, but they all seemed biased to consider it a real disorder, without the need for any definitive diagnosis for it or even proof - hope that doesn't sound too ignorant, I just did my little research today.

    So, if a child with ADD wasn't treated, could it still affect him in adulthood ? And how can you know it really is ADD, and how to overcome it ?

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    Broud Balestinian G-Virus's Avatar
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    People suffering from ADD/ADHD for the most part have lower sugar consumption in areas of the frontal lobe that are connected to focus. Amphetamines stimulate carbohydrate use and consumption in these areas to artificially high levels allowing the person to be naturally focused. The issue with this is that the amphetamines also inhibit other areas that are overactive in the brain of an ADD patient.

    Many clinicians see ADD/ADHD as a normal variation of human phenotype with extraordinary thinking abilities given to them from inhibition of control areas in the brain. Having ADD/ADHD is like removing the flood gates that control random thought at the cost of not being able to easily channel all these ideas into one coherent stream for too long.

    A person with this disorder that learns how to develop will power and focus is a powerful individual indeed as many of them are able to grasp concepts and learn things much quicker than most average humans. Medication works, but you are really robbing yourself of a gift if you choose to engage in that type of treatment.

    /Sources = I had to do my final undergraduate report on this for our biochemistry of disease class to graduate.
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    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    I think it's a real disorder, yet from working with kids and talking to parents as part of community service, I think it's something that is heavily overdiagnosed and over medicated. Honestly I think half of reported ADD cases are just a lack of stimulation, diet issues, and lack of discipline.



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    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nihilen View Post
    I have no idea where to start this, so I'll start it here for now.

    So, is ADD real or is it an excuse for kids -and later on adults- to be unproductive ?

    I have read about it on a couple sources, but they all seemed biased to consider it a real disorder, without the need for any definitive diagnosis for it or even proof - hope that doesn't sound too ignorant, I just did my little research today.

    So, if a child with ADD wasn't treated, could it still affect him in adulthood ? And how can you know it really is ADD, and how to overcome it ?
    It's not really an excuse, it's a reason. It's sort of like finding out your an infp, and using that as an excuse to be lazy and unproductive all the time lol.

    One you are diagnosed then it's meant to be a path of learning to cope with and get better, not an excuse (although no doubt some will use it since they love any chance to excuse their behaviour guilt free).

    I believe it's a real disorder, I probably have it because I have most of the symptoms, but I didn't need another label for being like this.
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-Virus View Post
    People suffering from ADD/ADHD for the most part have lower sugar consumption in areas of the frontal lobe that are connected to focus. Amphetamines stimulate carbohydrate use and consumption in these areas to artificially high levels allowing the person to be naturally focused. The issue with this is that the amphetamines also inhibit other areas that are overactive in the brain of an ADD patient.

    Many clinicians see ADD/ADHD as a normal variation of human phenotype with extraordinary thinking abilities given to them from inhibition of control areas in the brain. Having ADD/ADHD is like removing the flood gates that control random thought at the cost of not being able to easily channel all these ideas into one coherent stream for too long.

    A person with this disorder that learns how to develop will power and focus is a powerful individual indeed as many of them are able to grasp concepts and learn things much quicker than most average humans. Medication works, but you are really robbing yourself of a gift if you choose to engage in that type of treatment.

    /Sources = I had to do my final undergraduate report on this for our biochemistry of disease class to graduate.
    Thanks man, very interesting.
    I actually always dismissed ADD because I thought it had to be connected with hyperactivity. I was just wondering, I don't need solutions necessarily, just to know.
    Thinking of my childhood, I'm pretty sure I had to be ADD, my attention span was practically inexistent. The problem is, many of the traits are related to _N_P traits that I thought I had as extremes. So there could be a confusion.

    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    I think it's a real disorder, yet from working with kids and talking to parents as part of community service, I think it's something that is heavily overdiagnosed and over medicated. Honestly I think half of reported ADD cases are just a lack of stimulation, diet issues, and lack of discipline.
    That's what I was thinking. There's practically no way in knowing for sure if one has ADD or not.

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    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    i have mixed feelings on this. talking to people who've dealt with it makes it appear to be a very real issue but i can't help but think there's something else going on and another way to treat it. colmena shared an interesting link with me about creativity and the speaker talked about this ballet teacher...very well known dancer and choreographer who remembers not being able to sit still in class...her mother took her to the dr. and after talking with her for a bit left the room...turned on the music and then he and the mother watched her through the window and saw her get up and dance...later they asked why she did that and she said she just couldn't think unless she was moving...so...the dr. told the mother to enroll her in dance classes...and she did...they found the problem...and the solution for her...and the speaker talked about how another mother might have just gave the kid some add meds and told her to calm down. it's sad that we expect everyone to behave a certain way and try to "fix" them when they're not...so...might be true for some...but it's sad to think we may be missing out on some great talent from these kids who are just medicated instead.


    edit: here's the link colmena shared with me that i was talking about...if anyone is interested.
    YouTube - Sir Ken Robinson: Do schools kill creativity?
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    Senior Member The Third Rider's Avatar
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    I think it is, I have a friend that has ADD and sometimes when were are working at the gym he will count for me he will go like; 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, niner (freaking Marine Corps lol), 12, 17, 20. Than I tell him that he went completely off and he always goes like "really?". He does this quite often too, his mind seems to focus on "the next thing."
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-Virus View Post
    People suffering from ADD/ADHD for the most part have lower sugar consumption in areas of the frontal lobe that are connected to focus. Amphetamines stimulate carbohydrate use and consumption in these areas to artificially high levels allowing the person to be naturally focused. The issue with this is that the amphetamines also inhibit other areas that are overactive in the brain of an ADD patient.

    Many clinicians see ADD/ADHD as a normal variation of human phenotype with extraordinary thinking abilities given to them from inhibition of control areas in the brain. Having ADD/ADHD is like removing the flood gates that control random thought at the cost of not being able to easily channel all these ideas into one coherent stream for too long.

    A person with this disorder that learns how to develop will power and focus is a powerful individual indeed as many of them are able to grasp concepts and learn things much quicker than most average humans. Medication works, but you are really robbing yourself of a gift if you choose to engage in that type of treatment.

    /Sources = I had to do my final undergraduate report on this for our biochemistry of disease class to graduate.
    I'm gonna have to agree with you. I've not been officially diagnosed as having ADD but I believe I do. Up until recently I was taking 20 mg's of Adderall (around three months) and stopped because I was too laid back and having short term memory probs. I wasn't getting anything done and my life seemed to have no purpose. I am much happier now and glad I stopped taking it.
    Time is a delicate mistress.

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    one of my best friends stopped taking hers too...she found she couldn't sleep without pills for that too and felt like she was more confrontational and just kinda bitchy on them...she thinks it was the sleeping pills doing that though...but she didn't feel like herself and wasn't at all happier.
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Third Rider View Post
    I think it is, I have a friend that has ADD and sometimes when were are working at the gym he will count for me he will go like; 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, niner (freaking Marine Corps lol), 12, 17, 20. Than I tell him that he went completely off and he always goes like "really?". He does this quite often too, his mind seems to focus on "the next thing."
    lol I thought that was perhaps an NJ thing.
    I feel as though I am always many steps ahead but it's not out of control or anything. My husband and I have the next 5 years mapped out with the obvious in mind that certain things are out of our control.
    Quote Originally Posted by erinavery View Post
    one of my best friends stopped taking hers too...she found she couldn't sleep without pills for that too and felt like she was more confrontational and just kinda bitchy on them...she thinks it was the sleeping pills doing that though...but she didn't feel like herself and wasn't at all happier.
    yeah, that's not good. but what is good is that she realized and stopped taking them. I'm not against meds but you gotta be careful and at least aware of your behavior (if possible) and listen to those who love you as they are usually the ones who notice things you can't/won't admit to. When I forgot my Mom's Birthday and was so zoned out and neglecting day to day things that I use to enjoy, I realized I had to stop.
    Time is a delicate mistress.

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