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  1. #11
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    I'm thtill thtruggling, but thoon. Very thoon.*

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    There ith no awareneth of motion exthept in relation to thtillneth. ~Alan Wattth
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    *

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tallulah View Post
    Actually, Mo, I think being a student might be a good thing--you might find out if your university has a speech therapy department, and if there's any sort of program where they need the hours of "practicing" on volunteer subjects. It wouldn't hurt to ask if there's anything like that in place.
    My college isn't large enough to have such a department but I'll be moving to London soon. Thanks for the tip. Will shop around a bit at major Unis looking for exactly that.


    Quote Originally Posted by ragashree View Post
    One of my neices had a terrible lithp when she was little. She simply didn't seem able to hear or appreciate the difference between certain letters, particularly "f" and soft "th", sometimes "s" too -and would tend to use them more or less indiscriminately, and usually incorrectly. She was getting quite behind with her reading at the age of 7 and was receiving a lot of special help at school. This was a lot less helpful than the salary of the person who provided said assistance would lead one to hope; she ended up making no progress over a period of six months or so and was losing confidence and interest rapidly. The ability to distinguish said phonemes and read them aloud was one of the main criteria on which her progress in reading was being tested at that stage, unfortunately, and whatever her teacher was doing with her was clearly having not the slightest effect.

    I was more or less her main caregiver at the time, so I had plenty of opportunity to tackle the lisp issue in a contstructive way as it was clearly just holding her back.

    I began by drawing a picture of a comical fish, and asked her to read out what I had written underneath:

    "The fat fish was thick, with thin fins." *=Very evil uncle*

    It took her literally weeks of trying pretty much every day before she managed to pronounce the whole sentence correctly for the first time. She was so proud of herself! I tried to avoid negative comments and make it into something that was simultaneously an amusing game and a challenge for her to set herself, otherwise I doubt her enthusiasm would have continued for so long. I also gave her the opportunity to relax and laugh at me by making sure than when I pronounced it correctly I did so with comically exaggerated emphasis (this also helped her to focus more on HEARING the difference without pushing it on her).

    It was months more before she could say the silly phrase correctly every time. Once she actually could she liked to wind me up by coming out with it at random inappropriate moments, which I suppose served me right for inflicting it on her in the first place. But I do believe it worked if anything did. Her lisp was almost completely gone within a year and has never returned that I've noticed. She's now in her teens and so far from needing special help is one of those annoying perfect "A-Grade" students who is always right about everything... I'm tempted occasionally to ask if she remembers, but I just don't know if I could take hearing it again!

    I hope something in my story helped, anyway....
    Thank you for sharing that story. It will definitely be more difficult for me as I've had a lisp for 22 rather than 7 yrs but it's great to know that it can be overcome. Although mine is admittedly less prominent than that one so there's some hope.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatHeSaid View Post
    I'm thtill thtruggling, but thoon. Very thoon
    Ha ha

  4. #14
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    Yeth.

  5. #15
    Dali
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    Yeth.
    Actually, I'd be more likely to say 'yess'.

  6. #16
    Fight For Freedom FFF's Avatar
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    Default THE LISP TEST

    If you can't say the following, you have lisp:

    Please passeth the sixth thistle.

    I totally can't say it cause I have a slight lisp.

  7. #17
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
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    My sister has always had one since she first started talking. She's now 24 and it's become less noticeable, she's worked on it with the help of speech therapists and to be honest, though it's still there, considering how awful it used to be before I think there's hope for anyone!

    Sometimes a lisp can be 'hereditary' not in the physical sense, but sorta socially - my mom for example has always talked with a very slight lisp on her S's, barely noticeable, but because of that, all her 5 kids who learned to talk from her say their S's like her, though because it's not physical we've all learned (except my sister) to completely eliminate it.

    I used to have more problems with stuttering than lisping though, and speech therapy has helped me with that a lot. It also helped me with male vocal patterns and lowering my voice before it broke 10 years late lol
    Ils se d�merdent, les mecs: trop bon, trop con..................................MY BLOG!

    "When it all comes down to dust
    I will kill you if I must
    I will help you if I can" - Leonard Cohen

  8. #18
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    I don't think I talked with a lisp, but I did do speech therapy as a small child first I wasn't talking until age 2 so my parents thought I might be deaf, I wasn't. Then when I did begin talking I would talk too fast and too quiet for anyone to understand me. I'm convinced that as the youngest I realized that I didn't have to learn to talk or walk I got most everything I wanted plus I got to be carried everywhere. I can't wait til I'm old and senile just chilling in my motorized scooter chasing pigeons and small children down the street.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  9. #19
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    Youngest children take longer to end up talking and have more speech problems than the older ones

  10. #20
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mo_(operalover) View Post
    It wasn't a type-related joke! It was a lithp-related joke.

    GAWD.

    :thmile:

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