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  1. #101
    Senior Member StoryOfMyLife's Avatar
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    I enjoy dancing...it allows me to be moved by the music, so to speak. I took dance my senior year of high school, and I wasn't the best [not by a long shot] but I loved it soooo much! It was fun and freeing...and since we all looked somewhat silly at times, I didn't feel stupid doing it...

    ...I don't do it very much now, however...my embarrassment to do so in front of others has increased since that time.
    Don't hate me because you're beautiful.
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  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I do dance with my husband, but only horizontally.
    Metaphors are fine and delicate creatures.

    The only mistake you can make is to take them too far - then they collapse from exhaustion.

    Nonetheless, making love is a metaphor for dance; and dance is a metaphor for love making; and both are metaphors for life.

  3. #103
    E. N.. T... :P RiderOnTheStorm's Avatar
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    Story:

    Today at work I had winamp open on my laptop and I was dancing around merrily as if no one was watching. When all of a sudden this guy pops his head around the corner. I was immediately startled and let out this movie scream. (It was awesome.) Then he stood there stunned and then said, "nice dancing there. " I was like, "How long were you watching?" He says with a grin, "Oh, I don't know. 10 minutes or so." I says, "you're shitting me right?" He says nothing and continues to have a smile on his face that stretched from ear to ear. I was so embarrased. :blushing: Especially dancing like I was thinking that no one was watching. I look at him seriously and say, "that's not cool. What the fuck are you doing back here? You need to get the fuck out." LOL

    Anyways, I find dancing fun and lots of it. So much so I have taken classes to learn different styles of dance. I also find that dancing with a guy that can't dance what-so-ever is the cutest thing.
    You can't always do it right, you can always do what's left.

    Thoughts rearrange. Familiar now strange. All my skin is drifting on the wind.~

  4. #104
    Senior Member swordpath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
    You can flirt and show off your goods without automatically being deemed a slut.
    I'll deem those dancing women as sluts. All of them!

  5. #105
    Senior Member kuranes's Avatar
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    In many countries outside the USA, there is generally not as much of a distinction ( except at some special rituals ) over "performers" versus "witnesses/audience" at public events involving music, nor was this distinction so clear in eurocentric societies either, if you go back just a ways. Sometimes this becomes apparent even in modern USA, with soul/jazz/world artists expecting more of a "call and response" from the audience even during a performance versus "only" an enthusiastic applause at the official "ending" of it.

    There's lots of occasions where people might be dancing, and it's only natural that in some of them people might ( consciously or subconsciously ) compare themselves to the abilities of "performance" quality entertainers while "on display". ( Once again there is often a particular space that has been designated as the "dance floor" versus people just doing what they feel like wherever. )

    I understood what Victor meant about what a shame it is that so many people restrain themselves due to a feeling of self consciousness at these "celebrations". Telling people to basically "STFU" by saying "don't quit your day job yet" etc. has become so common now that it's a cliche statement. And yet the people who do this are often deemed by society to be so very clever and "cool" for having done so.

    On the other hand, we probably all can relate to the person living in an apartment building with thin walls who has a neighbor who is an enthusiastic amateur just beginning to learn to play the tuba.

    The stereotypical roles for hetero men and women tend to pigeonhole men as stoics. Somehow related to this stoic tradition of enduring misfortune etc. is the notion of "stick to basics" and this brings us the "men as non-peacocks" style that has become a strong meme in first world conventionality. Male clothing is often drab- suits and other attire in greys, blacks with only hints "pin stripes" of color. Translated to dance, this would tend to "restrain", and translated to voice...well. there is a natural division there. This is often mimed by instruments showing fast high pitched and rapid twittering to represent women and less frequent extremely low ( tuba ? ) strokes for the men. I'm not sure how the composers would interpret a butch lesbian. . ( Oddly enough, in the animal world, the male is literally the more colorful of the two - and of course "first world" human males can somehow manage to slip in a strut or two here and there. )

    When I used to go to clubs as a single young man, one of the things I was hoping to accomplish ( among others such as "being myself" and "having fun" ) was to meet young women. It didn't take long to discover the phenomenon some people mentioned in this thread: that many women preferred the non-dancing men, but enjoyed dancing themselves. So the way I decided to handle that challenge ( since I am sometimes in the mood to dance ) was to divide the clubs up, and do my dancing mostly in one category of them, and in the others ...mostly not, unless I was feeling the urge too strongly to resist.

    I wouldn't presume to explain the reason why women do this, but I did notice it. It seems to relate partly to the "counter-intuitiveness" that GTZ mentioned in an earlier thread.
    "The people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them that they are being attacked and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism, and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    Reichsfuhrer Herman Goering at the Nuremburg trials.

  6. #106
    soft and silky sarah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmm View Post
    I am amazed at the wild assumptions thrown around and antagonizing that came out of a simple thread about dancing.
    I know, it's really surprising to me too. I think maybe some people are confusing the phrase "can't dance" with some sort of mental inibition. I took it to mean that some people prefer not to have strangers watch and comment on their lack of gracefulness. Plenty of people I know are shy about strangers seeing them dance, but they're perfectly happy to dance around the house, or among friends, when they feel in the mood.

    My husband "can't dance" in the sense that he's not graceful and has never taken any dance classes, nor would he probably excel in a dance class if he took one. But he certainly CAN dance for joy around the house when he feels like it. In fact, we love to make up our own goofball dance moves together!

    As for me, I've taken ballet and social dance classes before (ballroom dancing), but I have much more fun making up my own moves to music I like. I'm not embarrassed at all with dancing in public, but I certainly wouldn't want to get up on stage and perform for a critical audience.

    Sarah
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  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by IF3157 View Post
    Let's face reality: you felt insulted because you perceived an attack on your masculinity. It is the mark of emotional maturity to exercise restraint in the face of perceived attack, but you found it much easier to lash out like a wounded beast to label and vilify that which hurt you. Your labeling is an attempt to externalize the bitter taste of an opinion that it pains you too much to examine more deeply. Having expressed your venom, you then prance about the thread like a ninny.
    OK, let's face reality. It's true, I did think masculinity was being dissed.

    And it true that restraint is the sign of emotional intelligence.

    And I did lash out like a wounded beast at the wound to masculinity.

    And I did dance about like a ninny.

    Being a wounded beast was bad enough but then I had to dance about like a ninny.

    I should have roared like a mountain lion and retired to my cave.

    But I am always inclined to take things too far.

    And I have no one blame but myself - you silly, silly ninny. What kind of mountain lion are you?

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuranes View Post
    In countries other than the USA, there is generally not as much of a distinction ( except at some special rituals ) over "performers" versus "witnesses/audience" at public events involving music, nor was this distinction so clear in eurocentric societies either, if you go back just a ways. Sometimes this becomes apparent even in modern USA, with soul/jazz/world artists expecting more of a "call and response" from the audience even during a performance versus "only" an enthusiastic applause at the official "ending" of it.

    There's lots of occasions where people might be dancing, and it's only natural that in some of them people might ( consciously or subconsciously ) compare themselves to the abilities of "performance" quality entertainers while "on display". ( Once again there is often a particular space that has been designated as the "dance floor" versus people just doing what they feel like wherever. )

    I understood what Victor meant about what a shame it is that so many people restrain themselves due to a feeling of self consciousness at these "celebrations". Telling people to basically "STFU" by saying "don't quit your day job yet" etc. has become so common now that it's a cliche statement. And yet the people who do this are often deemed by society to be so very clever and "cool" for having done so.

    On the other hand, we probably all can relate to the person living in an apartment building with thin walls who has a neighbor who is an enthusiastic amateur just beginning to learn to play the tuba.

    The stereotypical roles for hetero men and women tend to pigeonhole men as stoics. Somehow related to this stoic tradition of enduring misfortune etc. is the notion of "stick to basics" and this brings us the "men as non-peacocks" style that has become a strong meme in first world conventionality. Male clothing is often drab- suits and other attire in greys, blacks with only hints "pin stripes" of color. Translated to dance, this would tend to "restrain", and translated to voice...well. there is a natural division there. This is often mimed by instruments showing fast high pitched and rapid twittering to represent women and less frequent extremely low ( tuba ? ) strokes for the men. I'm not sure how the composers would interpret a butch lesbian. . ( Oddly enough, in the animal world, the male is literally the more colorful of the two - and of course "first world" human males can somehow manage to slip in a strut or two here and there. )

    When I used to go to clubs as a single young man, one of the things I was hoping to accomplish ( among others such as "being myself" and "having fun" ) was to meet young women. It didn't take long to discover the phenomenon some people mentioned in this thread: that many women preferred the non-dancing men, but enjoyed dancing themselves. So the way I decided to handle that challenge ( since I am sometimes in the mood to dance ) was to divide the clubs up, and do my dancing mostly in one category of them, and in the others ...mostly not, unless I was feeling the urge too strongly to resist.

    I wouldn't presume to explain the reason why women do this, but I did notice it. It seems to relate partly to the "counter-intuitiveness" that GTZ mentioned in an earlier thread.
    How very true.

    And I have just bought myself a cream suit which I will wear with a pink T-shirt. And tie a pink and cream ribbon round my long blonde hair.

    I will dance to my heart's content and think of all of you.

  9. #109
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuranes View Post
    In many countries outside the USA, there is generally not as much of a distinction ( except at some special rituals ) over "performers" versus "witnesses/audience" at public events involving music, nor was this distinction so clear in eurocentric societies either, if you go back just a ways. Sometimes this becomes apparent even in modern USA, with soul/jazz/world artists expecting more of a "call and response" from the audience even during a performance versus "only" an enthusiastic applause at the official "ending" of it.

    There's lots of occasions where people might be dancing, and it's only natural that in some of them people might ( consciously or subconsciously ) compare themselves to the abilities of "performance" quality entertainers while "on display". ( Once again there is often a particular space that has been designated as the "dance floor" versus people just doing what they feel like wherever. )

    I understood what Victor meant about what a shame it is that so many people restrain themselves due to a feeling of self consciousness at these "celebrations". Telling people to basically "STFU" by saying "don't quit your day job yet" etc. has become so common now that it's a cliche statement. And yet the people who do this are often deemed by society to be so very clever and "cool" for having done so.

    On the other hand, we probably all can relate to the person living in an apartment building with thin walls who has a neighbor who is an enthusiastic amateur just beginning to learn to play the tuba.

    The stereotypical roles for hetero men and women tend to pigeonhole men as stoics. Somehow related to this stoic tradition of enduring misfortune etc. is the notion of "stick to basics" and this brings us the "men as non-peacocks" style that has become a strong meme in first world conventionality. Male clothing is often drab- suits and other attire in greys, blacks with only hints "pin stripes" of color. Translated to dance, this would tend to "restrain", and translated to voice...well. there is a natural division there. This is often mimed by instruments showing fast high pitched and rapid twittering to represent women and less frequent extremely low ( tuba ? ) strokes for the men. I'm not sure how the composers would interpret a butch lesbian. . ( Oddly enough, in the animal world, the male is literally the more colorful of the two - and of course "first world" human males can somehow manage to slip in a strut or two here and there. )

    When I used to go to clubs as a single young man, one of the things I was hoping to accomplish ( among others such as "being myself" and "having fun" ) was to meet young women. It didn't take long to discover the phenomenon some people mentioned in this thread: that many women preferred the non-dancing men, but enjoyed dancing themselves. So the way I decided to handle that challenge ( since I am sometimes in the mood to dance ) was to divide the clubs up, and do my dancing mostly in one category of them, and in the others ...mostly not, unless I was feeling the urge too strongly to resist.

    I wouldn't presume to explain the reason why women do this, but I did notice it. It seems to relate partly to the "counter-intuitiveness" that GTZ mentioned in an earlier thread.
    +1
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anja View Post
    Catchin' up on the reading now, Victor. Off subject:

    The minister's son used to follow me home from school flinging clods of dirt in my general direction.

    (And I couldn't dance worth a poop either. All arms and legs like a joyous stork!)

    Ah young love!
    The minister's son - quelle horreur - he was just too shy to tell you he was smitten.

    Whereas as I was the publican's son and the odd clod was expected.

    No one expects the minister's son to be a clod - we expected better - but no one was surprised to find the publican's son was a clod.

    But love, it seems, turns us all into clods - quelle horreur.

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