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  1. #131
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Sprinkles dropped out of school, so what? Food for thought:

    Richard Branson - Virgin Group

    As a child, Richard Branson struggled with dyslexia throughout his school years. After finding difficulty adjusting to numerous schools, he dropped out at the age of 16 to start his own youth culture magazine, called "Student." After moving to London in the mid-1960s, Branson developed his idea for a mail-order record company to help fund his magazine efforts, which he named Virgin.

    Using a public phone box as his first office, Branson managed to sell records at significantly reduced prices. The venture proved highly successful, allowing Branson to expand the business with a record shop on Oxford Street. Over the coming decades, Branson would add an airline, drinks manufacturer and dozens of other ventures to his Virgin Group.

    Gates, Jobs, and Ellison all dropped out of college.

    As for the rest of this thread, seriously, wtf? It's like watching woodpeckers peck a tree to death. Is there really a point?
    Likes The Wailing Specter liked this post

  2. #132
    Lex Parsimoniae Xander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    As for the rest of this thread, seriously, wtf? It's like watching woodpeckers peck a tree to death. Is there really a point?
    To find the bit which cannot be broken by pecking.
    Isn't it time for a colourful metaphor?

  3. #133
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprinkles View Post
    No. Sci-fi is entertainment and is a lot of times damaging to science.
    That depends on how accurate the science part is. SF can certainly inspire interest in science, and I think that is the hardest job since once interested, a person will look for more information and not be satisfied with drivel and error. People who indulge in "recreational science" do things like launch rockets in their backyards, observe the night sky with a home telescope, play around with arduinos, or even get into the chemistry of things like cooking or winemaking.

    Quote Originally Posted by sprinkles View Post
    No. Science is not about enjoyable conversations and showing intelligence (scientists don't actually care about nerd cred all that much)

    It's supposed to be dry and technical. And besides, this thread is about difference in opinion, not about being included in the scientific community. Being more inclusive does not necessarily solve the issue.
    Science certainly is technical, but if it is dry, that indicates a poor communication style on the part of the person describing it. Sadly much of technical writing is like this, but it needn't be, and the fact that it is so is not a commentary on the subject matter itself. As for conversations, I find science provides an endless supply of enjoyable, stimulating, and informative conversations. That is one of the everyday joys of being a scientist. You are right about the "nerd cred", though.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...
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  4. #134
    I could do things Hard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    As for conversations, I find science provides an endless supply of enjoyable, stimulating, and informative conversations. That is one of the everyday joys of being a scientist. You are right about the "nerd cred", though.
    I can not emphasize this enough.

    If a scientist doesn't find it stimulating to talk about in and outside of a work context, then they are in the wrong field and will likely not last very long. Actually doing science is hard and rather demoralizing at times because all of the countless things that don't work (it's the nature of the beast and part of the process). Without the excitement and joy they find in science, it's very difficult if not impossible to slog through it.

    I don't think I have ever met a scientist who didn't enjoy talking about science. In and out of their field. Not every aspect of it of course, but a large portion of it.
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  5. #135
    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    That depends on how accurate the science part is. SF can certainly inspire interest in science, and I think that is the hardest job since once interested, a person will look for more information and not be satisfied with drivel and error. People who indulge in "recreational science" do things like launch rockets in their backyards, observe the night sky with a home telescope, play around with arduinos, or even get into the chemistry of things like cooking or winemaking.


    Science certainly is technical, but if it is dry, that indicates a poor communication style on the part of the person describing it. Sadly much of technical writing is like this, but it needn't be, and the fact that it is so is not a commentary on the subject matter itself. As for conversations, I find science provides an endless supply of enjoyable, stimulating, and informative conversations. That is one of the everyday joys of being a scientist. You are right about the "nerd cred", though.
    Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying that a scientist can't enjoy sci-fi. I'm not saying that science can't be inspiring.

    I'm not saying that science can't be fun, I'm not saying that you shouldn't ever enjoy it, and I'm not saying you shouldn't find entertainment value in it.

    What I AM saying is don't let these things get in your way of doing good science.

  6. #136
    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    @Coriolis

    Or to make a parallel: it's ok to watch a medical drama and be inspired and appreciate what surgeons do, and strive to be a surgeon yourself one day. It is not ok to watch a medical drama and think you're somehow in on it. That is very dangerous.

    Science is at least more forgiving in that there are a lot of experiments that you can try without killing people, especially in computer sciences and electronics if you have the dosh for things.

    "In the discovery of secret things and in the investigation of hidden causes, stronger reasons are obtained from sure experiments and demonstrated arguments than from probable conjectures and the opinions of philosophical speculators of the common sort." ~ William Gilbert

  7. #137
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    It's easy to forget that Science is very non-intuitive. Even with all of this education on the sciences, on reasoning and maths, I suspect that most people only get out of it what they manage to find useful in everyday life. Everyday people on the whole need to know pretty much nothing about scientific method, physics and logic.

    A large amount of people who love the sciences think of it essentially as a form of neato magic, the end results being colorful displays of whizzbang dazzle. And, honestly, I feel that this is reasonable. As an idealist, even I can recognize that the idea of 'informed citizen' is pie-in-the-sky.

  8. #138
    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    @Coriolis

    Additionally I would argue that dry information is efficient information and I could trivially back this up based on computational requirements.

    How much 'salt' a person thinks they need in their information in order to digest it comes down to personal preference, but when it comes to the information itself, straight up is the best way to transmit it.

    Edit:
    Also most of you guys appear to be intermingling science into life and the social circus, and meanwhile I'm separating it from the same.

  9. #139
    Senior Member Eluded_One's Avatar
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    Science

    end of story
    “If you worry about what might be, and wonder what might have been, you will ignore what is.” -anonymous

  10. #140
    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    @Hard

    Also I have an explanation for EVERYTHING I have said in this thread.

    If there's some reasoning of mine that you don't understand, I can expound on it if you wish. You talk about not being a mind reader, well neither am I. If you don't want to understand me then I won't make you. If you want to, I CAN try to explain. But if you automatically write me off then I'll be a lot less inclined to do so.

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