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  1. #11
    violaine
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    OP refers to a link that OP neglects to post. Perhaps OP forgot.
    Here it is: http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/...090421354.html
    Credit: @Njinte

    So it's official: in addition to fucking up your body, your sex life, your social life and your career, pregnancy also fucks up your brain?

    Why do people do this stuff again?
    Oh yeah. That ticking clock...
    Biology is a cruel mistress indeed. Particularly cruel to females it seems, then again, testosterone produces a near-permanent "brain fog" all of it's own...

    Thankfully, as a genderless INTP freak I don't have to contend with these problems.

    I have though, observed massive changes in the behaviour and cognitive abilities of broody hens. They become very territorial, more aggressive and vocal and also kinda ...fucked in the head - they forget to eat and drink, stop taking care of themselves, lose their place in the pecking order, get fixated on their nests and go into a sort of catatonic trance, which, I suppose, is a mercy given how boring it must be to sit in the nest all day every day. All this must be mediated by hormones, they do it with or without actual chicks or even eggs.
    It's sad to watch. I wish someone would come up with an antidote already.
    I'm flattered you're following me around the board. Thanks for having my back, but that outdated research wasn't the thrust of my OP, so I didn't bother with it. Hence the phrase, "Further to Nijinte's link".

    I suppose you'll be very happy for me then to know that I have a nanny and am a free bird whenever I want to be. :-). Edit: Though I happily spend most of my time with my babies.

    We all know you were probably a self-hating embryo, so your view on spawning comes as no surprise. Although, there was this once:

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    There's little doubt that my offspring would be awesome.

    I'd seriously consider being an egg donor. But beyond that, evolution can kiss my ass. (goodbye)
    What, no takers?

    I guess evolution can kiss my ass hello.

  2. #12
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I'm just going to warn the two of you once not to continue the hostility on the forum, veiled or open or otherwise.

  3. #13
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I wonder if other situations in which you are rapidly developing a new skill set under duress has the same effect.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  4. #14
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    Or, y'know, the trauma of expelling an 8 pound object or two from a bodily orifice.

  5. #15
    violaine
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    The research I linked states that motherhood may cause the brain to grow, not turn to mush as the old stereotype would have people believe. I'm thinking that sleep deprivation may be the most likely cause of any fuzziness in thinking ability in new parents. (Not just mothers). The ability to multitask may be something that's affected negatively by new motherhood though, for a little while. But the parts of the brain involved in organizing and planning are thought to eventually get a boost. Amongst other regions.

  6. #16
    violaine
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiltyred View Post
    Or, y'know, the trauma of expelling an 8 pound object or two from a bodily orifice.
    It wasn't that bad for me. The last months of my pregnancy were harder.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    Well, yeah -- that, too. I'm just sayin', I don't think you have to look too far for reasons! Any number of them leap immediately to mind. You can't underestimate the effect of various endocrine upsets, either.

  8. #18
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    My husband and I usually both got the fuzzy part pretty badly and it generally passed around month three. My brain was also wonky during pregnancy, but I also felt shitty and exhausted for most of the time I was gestating, so that likely didn't help.

    I wasn't aware of the brain growth thing, but it makes sense that it would see some growth since you are, in effect acquiring and incorporating a lot of new skills and behaviors.

    It would be interesting to know if the addition of weird hormones or some other factor contributes to it or if it just happens when you are in a situation that requires a lot from you suddenly and with little wiggle room. Like, it might be similar for soldiers in combat . . . although that seems like it would be a lot worse plus more traumatic but I'm not coming up with a better comparison right off the top of my head. I'm sure there are better ones.

    For me most of the difficult part of parenting was over around the time the youngest got to second grade. It's probably a little earlier when one's kids are neurotypical, I'd think. Unless you are doing the helicopter parenting thing, which I'm not.

    Edit: I think your brain kind of glosses over the childbirth thing or something after it's over. I don't think there would be very many second children if it didn't.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  9. #19
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by violaine View Post
    I suppose you'll be very happy for me then to know that I have a nanny and am a free bird whenever I want to be. :-). Edit: Though I happily spend most of my time with my babies.
    And what about your husband? Does he need a nanny to be a "free bird"?
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  10. #20
    violaine
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    And what about your husband? Does he need a nanny to be a "free bird"?
    I don't have a husband. What is the point of your question?

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