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  1. #1
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Default Help me save our species!

    This is based on big bang theory, momentum and posted in laymans terms for easy discussion!

    The universe:All mass created from a singular explosion, sprouting out mass in all densities towards the far reaches of the galaxy 10-15 billion years ago. The big bang.

    Momentum:The force of ever dissipating movement driving the universe outward, eventually reaching a stop, inevitably followed by slowly reversing all thing matter back into one big giant mass, all bundling up into one super mass of extreme gravity. Forcing the molecules so densily together, there will eventually be a another huge explosion. The pulse of the universe itself!
    According to hubble, the universe is still rapidly expanding at this point in time, so for now we have not reached the full momentum of the big bang.

    The problem:How do we survive the jumbled up mass of all things universe, that is likely to happen, many billions of years from now, possibly trillions. And how do we survive the ultimate explosion following the supermass contraction and shoots us back into the universe?



    Post your ideas of how we could escape the fate of having our bodies being pressed by the force of a zillion times our own weight, cramped into a space that even a microscope could not register as well as the subsequent superblast throwing out jumbled up particles back into the universe?

    Note: One can not assume leaving in a rocket and go far beyond the reaches of the universe is a viable solution, because as the universe inevitably contracts, the sheer gravitational attraction would be inescapable and will ultimately draw the rockets/ships close to the center as well, as per the definition of universal momentem, we are part of said momentum. Also the further away one is from that center compared to the rest of the mass in the universe, the faster one will be drawn towards that center, as there will be all mass pulling on us from one direction and none from the other. As the contraction is the complete sum of all mass in the universe. (So as the universe contracts, the mass close to the center will move relatively slow compared to the mass on the outer reaches. And being far beyond the furthest other mass (as we are also mass) will only result in supafast travel to the center of all. Hope this makes sense, it should.)

    Note 2: It is not unthinkable, but unwise to assume the big bang will occur without the universe requiring the full force of all matter presently occupying said universe. In other words, assume that by going to the far reaches, and eventually subjecting to the gravitational attraction of the centermass, the universe will not blow up again until we are within it's blast range ourselves. We are to devise a strategy that will save us without relying on guesses, people!

    PS: My answer is "We're royally screwed." But I'm not very optimistic. I'm sure others here can think of clever ways to escape our inevitable fate. So help me save us!
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  2. #2
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    I'm thinking maybe we can do something if we add in a slingshot manouver, but we would need a whole lot of hard to get information to make that work!


    We'd need to find out the exact critical point of the centermass. (Time until BOOM)
    Detailed and full information about the gravitational pull it has on the universe. (PULL Powah)
    The distance required to slingshot at a safe orbital distance from the centermass without subjecting to too much g-force (Minimum radius of survivable gravitational forces.)

    And then calculate the speed we need to achieve a slingshot manouver around the centermass in the allotted time before the explosion whilest at a safe distance and not reaching our full momentum until at the furthest point possible from the centermass at the moment of explosion. And then hoping we're far away enough.

    That's the best I've come up with so far.

    (@knight Although I think creating a time machine might prove more difficult. Let's not be defeatist and think we need to be smarter for this and leave it to our children! We can do this, we can save our species from certain doom! :P )
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  3. #3
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Our current cosmology suggests the opposite scenario: that the universe's current expansion will continue to accelerate indefinitely. There's no reason to assume we're going to have a big crunch. All matter in galaxies will eventually be sucked into the black holes at their center, and once the universe is populated by pockets of ultramassive black holes, those black holes will evaporate [via Hawking radiation] until the universe is just a cold, dead place.

    So, I've spared our species a death of unimaginable conflagration in exchange for slow, torturous fizzle. You're welcome.



  4. #4
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    Our current cosmology suggests the opposite scenario: that the universe's current expansion will continue to accelerate indefinitely. There's no reason to assume we're going to have a big crunch. All matter in galaxies will eventually be sucked into the black holes at their center, and once the universe is populated by pockets of ultramassive black holes, those black holes will evaporate [via Hawking radiation] until the universe is just a cold, dead place.

    So, I've spared our species a death of unimaginable conflagration in exchange for slow, torturous fizzle. You're welcome.
    That makes less sense. Where's that from anyway! If something moves appart through force of explosion, and eventually reaches a dead stop, the attraction between masses will eventually become greater than the momentum of the big bang and all mass will start to swim together. What's this about black holes 'dissappearing'!? Black holes or just masses with a lot of gravitational power that even sucks in light. The centermass will also be called a 'black hole' as one can not see light reflecting back from it ofcourse.

    I just looked into Hawking radiation and so far there is no actual proof of its existance, and it is based on an assumption in order to attempt to classify a black hole as a potential dissappating force, rather than an existing ball of super matter that is here to stay.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  5. #5
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    That makes less sense. Where's that from anyway! If something moves appart through force of explosion, and eventually reaches a dead stop, the attraction between masses will eventually become greater than the momentum of the big bang and all mass will start to swim together. What's this about black holes 'dissappearing'!? Black holes or just masses with a lot of gravitational power that even sucks in light. The centermass will also be called a 'black hole' as one can not see light reflecting back from it ofcourse.
    The universe's expansion isn't slowing down, it's speeding up. Every galaxy, more or less, is hurtling away from each other at an increasing rate. If there were to be a Big Crunch, we should see them slowing down, the initial momentum of the Big Bang succumbing to gravity, as you say, but that's not what's happening.

    And yes, if left alone for a long time, black holes evaporate Hawking radiation. What happens is that when a particle pair winks into existence via quantum fluctuation near the black hole's event horizon, one gets sucked in, the other does not. The absorbed particle has negative energy which winds up reducing the mass of the black hole and an observer "sees" an emitted light particle from the surface of the black hole.




  6. #6
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    I thought black holes couldn't be seen, except for the stuff hurtling towards it? :o

    Also, accelerated rate is easily enough explained through relativity theory.

    I could explain the accelerated rate of expansion through conventional means easy enough. Since the big bang is the only true force existing in the universe and there is no gravitational counterpart interfering with it, when the big bang occured and space between the varius masses became increasingly larger due to expansion, the gravitational effect between the galaxies themselves continue to grow weaker, whilest the sheer force of the inital big bang and the momentum there off is still strongly pushing at a rate that decreases less than the force inbetween galaxies themselves. Causing the galaxies to move faster and faster apart from each other. So the force on the masses on the far outer reaches of the universe still have a lot of big bang momentum which dissappates sure, but there is increasingly less pull back force from the matter than is being hurled behind them as well, the big bang just wins, for now. Still, one day, that momentum will lose it's... well momentum.

    Mark my words! You'll see.

    When NASA starts creating explosions under vacuum conditions (They probably have already, I doubt there's no one that haven't thought about that yet, but I'm hoping I'm the first. >.> ), the expansion of the universe as we know it will make perfect sense!
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  7. #7
    FRACTALICIOUS phobik's Avatar
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    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRM6QVrs_Kg"]BBC[/YOUTUBE]
    To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.
    ~ Elbert Hubbard

    Music provides one of the clearest examples of a much deeper relation between mathematics and human experience.

  8. #8
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    I'm clearly not sold on the uncertainty principle. I think there are factors being overlooked, woven deeply into the mechanics of atoms beyond the scope of our imaginations.

    I side with Einstein on this one. *nod*
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  9. #9
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    We could all take up religion and then, we'd all live forever in Heaven or Hell. Problem solved...right?

  10. #10
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    There was no big bang. There was no explosion. The galaxies are not moving away from each other at an accelerating rate, rather it is space itself that is expanding at an accelerating rate, and simply carrying the galaxies along.

    And interestingly, although matter can't go faster than the speed of light, space can expand faster than the speed of light. So eventually everything you can see in night sky will disappear from view, except our own galaxy, the Milky Way. We will be left truly alone in the universe, with no way to understand the nature of the universe, hidden behind an impenetrable event horizon.

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